You are currently browsing the monthly archive for February 2016.

bowie penelope

Fashion, concepts, ideas on the move becoming art and culture, that is the magic alchemy featuring in “A tribute to David Bowie”, exhibition event which will be held on 25th February 2016 from 6:00 to 9:00 pm in Brescia at Penelope, the renowned cathedral of conceptual fashion by the one and only Roberta Valentini. It’s a homage to the eternal artistic creativity, made of sounds and visions, of the legendary David Bowie, where it will be showcased the creations by Kansai Yamamoto  – fashion designer who collaborated for a long time with Bowie- along with others by Comme des Garçons, Jeremy Scott, Keith Haring Pant, coming from the Penelope archive and Polaroid selfies. A not to be missed happening to celebrate a genius artist under the sign of fashion and art.

“A TRIBUTE TO DAVID BOWIE” DI PENELOPE, LA CATTEDRALE DELLA MODA CONCETTUALE

David Bowie and Kansai Yamamoto

David Bowie and Kansai Yamamoto

Moda, concetti, idee in movimento che diventano arte e cultura, questa la magica alchimia protagonista di “A tribute to David Bowie”, evento espositivo che si terrà il 25 febbraio 2016 dalle 18:00 alle ore 21:00 a Brescia presso Penelope, la rinomata cattedrale di moda concettuale della sola e unica Roberta Valentini. È un omaggio all’ eterna creatività artistica, fatta di suoni e visioni, del leggendario David Bowie, in cui saranno esposte le creazioni di Kansai Yamamoto – fashion designer che ha collaborato per lungo tempo con Bowie – insieme ad altre di Comme des Garçons, Jeremy Scott, Keith Haring Pant, provenienti dall’ archivio di Penelope e selfies su Polaroid. Un evento imperdibile per celebrare un geniale artista all’ insegna di moda e arte.

David Bowie wearing a catsuit by Kansai Yamamoto

David Bowie wearing a catsuit by Kansai Yamamoto

 

www.penelope-store.it

Bowie-AFP-COVER-option-2-EDIT

It has recently released “Strung out in heaven: a Bowie string quartet tribute”(Essex Music International), the EP – wonderful project entirely financed through Patreon.com – by the brilliant Amanda Palmer & Jherek Bischoff which pays homage to the genius, unforgettable David Bowie who passed away about one month ago. This work which is under the sign of lyricism, delicacy and elegance of sound, also features other artists as John Cameron Mitchell, Neil Gainman and Anna Calvi who made along with Amanda Palmer an awesome cover of single track “Blackstar” which titles the last, magnificent album by Bowie, released some days ago before dying due to cancer. Remembering that, the artists will give part of the proceeds arising from the first month of sales of the EP( which is available in the Amanda Palmer’s website: http://amandapalmer.bandcamp.com/album/strung-out-in-heaven-a-bowie-string-quartet-tribute) to the cancer research wing of Tufts Medical Center, in memory of David Bowie.

“STRUNG OUT IN HEAVEN: A BOWIE STRING QUARTED TRIBUTE” DI AMANDA PALMER & JHEREK BISCHOFF

É stato recentemente pubblicato “Strung out in heaven: a Bowie string quartet tribute”(Essex Music International), l’ EP – meraviglioso progetto interamente finanziato attraverso Patreon.com – della brillante Amanda Palmer e Jherek Bischoff che rende omaggio al geniale, indimenticabile David Bowie che circa un mese fa è venuto a mancare. Quest’ opera che è all’ insegna di lirismo, delicatezza ed eleganza del suono, ha anche quali protagonisti altri artisti come John Cameron Mitchell, Neil Gainman e Anna Calvi che ha realizzato insieme ad Amanda Palmer una fantastica cover del singol “Blackstar”, il quale intitola l’ ultimo magnifico album di Bowie, pubblicato qualche giorno prima di morire a causa di cancro. Memori di ciò, gli artisti doneranno parte del ricavato derivante dal primo mese di vendite dell’ EP (che è disponibile sul sito di Amanda Palmer: http://amandapalmer.bandcamp.com/album/strung-out-in-heaven-a-bowie-string-quartet-tribute) all’ ala di ricerca sul cancro del Tufts Medical Center in memoria di David Bowie.

http://amandapalmer.net

Edoardo Quarantelli introducing Francesco Roat at the Rome Aseq bookshop, photo by N

Edoardo Quarantelli introducing Francesco Roat at the Rome Aseq bookshop, photo by N

Desire, word defining – as it is evidences the Treccani Italian dictionary – “the intense feeling which pushes to look for the fulfillment of all that can satisfy a physical and spiritual need”, as well as the one of “lack of a thing being necessary to one’s own physical and spiritual interest”. It’s interesting to think about the etymology of this word which, considering the Etymological Dictionary of Italian Language (DELI) stands, as “to stop contemplating the stars for an augural purpose”. That, as the philosopher Umberto Galimberti says, refers to the “De Bello Gallico” by Gaius Iulius Caesar: the desiderantes (or the ones who desired) were the soldiers who were under the stars to wait for the ones who still didn’t come back after they fought during the day. It arises from that the meaning of the verb to desire: to stand under the star and wait. This meaning refers to an idea of communion of the man with universe, a dimension ruled by natural laws (also reminding me the quote by Immanuel Kant: “the starry sky above me and the moral law within me”) and at first seems it is not pertaining to the geographies of desire, its contorted paths, atavistic theme which is the quintessence of human condition, draws the ontology of individual and is bringer of many inputs and suggestions connected to contemporary times, phenomenon as the mass narcissism and hyper-hedonism of society, promoted and emphasized by the mainstream culture. It almost sounds like a hiatus, but it is not like that, considering these words are said by someone – the one who writes – who often spends a lot of them to draw the contemporary creativity – oriented to the kalokagathia, or to celebrate the beautiful and the good – embodied in fashion and its product, which doesn’t exist, gets any success if it isn’t sold. And this moment, the moment of sale is strictly linked to another moment, the presentation and communication of fashion, its product, which has the purpose to create an emotion, to light a fire, desire, rush to enter and belong to the universe depicted by that product and its consumption (in fact it often talks about the lifestyle products or those products drawing a certain lifestyle) These mainly sociological suggestions are the contextualization into a narrower and more specific theme or fashion, source of culture and commodities category, of a wider subject, brightly told by author and literary critic Francesco Roat in the book he wrote “Desiderare invano. Il mito di Faust in Goethe e altrove”( “To desire in vain. The mith of Faust in Goethe and elsewhere”, Moretti & Vitali, Euros 14,00) which has recently launched in Rome at the Aseq bookshop, (wonderful place to discover, where to stay and come back, of whose soul is tangible, a genuine cathedral of knowledge, created about forty years ago by Edoardo Quarantelli and Luca Nerazzini).

 “Desiderare invano. Il mito di Faust in Goethe e altrove”( “To desire in vain. The mith of Faust in Goethe and elsewhere”) by Francesco Roat, photo by N

“Desiderare invano. Il mito di Faust in Goethe e altrove”( “To desire in vain. The mith of Faust in Goethe and elsewhere”) by Francesco Roat, photo by N

I was pleased during this circumstance of meeting and facing before and during the event with the author of this book. Francesco was very generous with me and the audience which was at the book launch, of whose title refers to the legendary doctor Faust, the man, doctor and necromancer who lived in the late Middle Age and sold his soul to the devil to get in exchange for supernatural powers, being the personification of the excess of desire. I like reminding the play by Marlowe “The tragical history of Doctor Faustus”, though the literary revisitations of the persona are many, the one by Goethe is the most touching and human, a masterpiece of Romantic literature. A myth, the one of Faust, – as Burckhardt asserted -, “a primordial image into whose every human being can/must catch its own essence and destiny”. André Neher thinks this image represents the myth of modern man as well as Aldo Carotenuto, one of the most relevant persona of the Junghism, is oriented in the same sense, thinking it needs “consider Faust as a mythical image of collective unconscious which will embody time to time in the structure of contemporary man, having his features, absorbing his dramas and fears, thus turning into the most amazing archetype of modernity”. A man who wants having all and is punished because he wanted having all. This seems like the big drama of Faust, but it’s not like that. The myth depicts the human desire of totality, emancipating, as Roat clarifies in a clear, persuasive and intelligible way, “from divine/dogmatic rules, the urge of knowing/exploring reality in its deep cockles of the heart, being free from any ethical/religious boundaries, then the self-righteousness of tending in an overwhelming/obsessive way to go beyond any human limit” ( idea recalling the Übermensch, Superman by Nietzsche, enlivened by the will to power). Faust is also “the non-conformist who wants savoring any delight, satisfying any instinct or longing”. That – the author says – “represents an useful reading key of the post-late modern Western man who, is willing to the disenchantment and is disappointed by any ideological credo, seems more wrapped in his closing which is under the sign of a narcissism, tending to the reification of the other from self and is involved in an eternal desiring tension/fibrillation”, if he doesn’t falls in the depressive stasis, a tedium vitae (boredom of life) which lacks passions or worst a deadly nihilism of an individual who is disaffected, slothful and indifferent to the “you” and God, as well as to his own ego”.

A memory from over a decades ago, me, myself and I in Staufen (the town of Frederick II), at the roadhouse where the legend tells Faust sold his soul to Mephistopheles, photo by Diana Illing

A memory from over a decade ago, me, myself and I in Staufen (the town of Frederick II), at the  roadhouse where the legend tells Faust sold his soul to Mephistopheles, photo by Diana Illing

Youth, love, money, power are the gifts given by Mephistopheles to Faust, desires that also enliven the contemporary times, one of all, the desire of extending one’s own life, because the drama of individual, as the writer asserts, arises from the finitude of human condition, the consciousness of having a start and an end or to die, instead of the animals that aren’t conscious of their own death, but they are just only conscious of the other animals’ death. Instead that, it’s a fact, a reality before or after we face with that or rather with the death, should be a mere invite to live joyfully, reconciled with our soul and the world surrounding us during this short life, without repressing or annihilating the desire, being a human quality and propulsive motion of life and its dynamism, connecting it to the principle of reality, freeing it from the illusions or the desiring in vain – with the surrenders which it implies behind the principle of pleasure – where sensitivity and reason is one next to the other and invites the individual to its crossing”. “To contemplate the sky and the order of universe – and tend at the same time to elevate ourselves for the time we have – means to make ours a vision of life which pays less attention to the death as law of the life, means to become conscious of the impossibility of any absolute, eternal delight. It means to endorse the light and dark contrasts of a lasting shadiness”. This is the core, the invite and lesson arising from the reading of this book – precious pearl of wisdom to think about and rethink about oneself – and the myth of Faust who is not punished by God, who distances at the moment of death his soul from Mephistopheles and makes him ascend in the sky, because “errs the man until he looks for”, thus God asserted in the Prologue in the sky included in the beginning of Faust. Therefore God is indulgent towards who – like Faust – “made the overwhelming and never satisfied rush towards the fullness of life, absolute, knowledge or the otherness/ulteriority going beyond all that is ordinary, finished and known, his own reason to live.

 

LE GEOGRAFIE DEL DESIDERIO: LA PRESENTAZIONE DI “DESIDERARE INVANO. IL MITO DI FAUST IN GOETHE E ALTROVE” DI FRANCESCO ROAT ALLA LIBRERIA ASEQ DI ROMA

Edoardo Quarantelli and Francesco Roat at the Rome Aseq bookshop, photo by N

Edoardo Quarantelli and Francesco Roat at the Rome Aseq bookshop, photo by N

Il desiderio, lemma che definisce – come evidenzia il dizionario della lingua italiana Treccani – l’ “intenso sentimento che spinge a cercare l’ attuazione di quanto possa appagare un bisogno fisico e spirituale”, come anche quello della “mancanza di cosa necessaria al proprio interesse fisico e spirituale”. È interessante riflettere sull’ etimologia di questa parola che per il Dizionario Etimologico della Lingua Italiana (DELI) equivale a “cessare di contemplare le stelle a scopo augurale”. Ciò, come afferma il filosofo Umberto Galimberti, rimanda al “De Bello Gallico” di Caio Giulio Cesare: i desiderantes (ovvero coloro che desideravano) erano i soldati che stavano sotto le stelle ad aspettare quelli che dopo aver combattuto durante il giorno non erano ancora tornati. Da qui deriva il significato del verbo desiderare: stare sotto le stelle ed attendere. Tale significato fa riferimento a un concetto di comunione dell’ uomo con l’ universo, a una dimensione regolata da leggi di natura (mi richiama alla mente anche l’ aforisma di Immanuel Kant: “il cielo stellato sopra di me, la legge morale dentro me”) e sembra prima facie non essere del tutto pertinente con le geografie del desiderio, le sue tortuose vie, tema atavico che è la quintessenza della condizione umana, disegna l’ ontologia dell’ individuo ed è foriero di plurimi spunti e riflessioni connesse alla contemporaneità, a fenomeni quali il narcisismo di massa e l’ iperedonismo della società, promosso ed enfatizzato dalla cultura di mainstream. Sembra quasi uno iato e non lo è, che queste parole provengano da chi – colei che scrive – sovente ne spende tante per disegnare la creatività contemporanea – orientata alla kalokagathia, ovvero a celebrare il bello e il buono -, racchiusa nella moda e nel suo prodotto, che non esiste, non riscuote alcun consenso ove non sia venduto. E questo momento, quello della vendita è strettamente legato a un altro momento, quello della presentazione e comunicazione della moda, del suo prodotto, finalizzato a creare un’ emozione, accendere un fuoco, desiderio, moto, per entrare e appartenere all’ universo dipinto da quel prodotto e dal suo consumo (spesso si parla infatti di prodotti di lifestyle ovvero quei prodotti che disegnano un determinato stile di vita). Queste suggestioni eminentemente sociologiche, sono la contestualizzazione in un tema più ristretto e specifico ovvero la moda, fonte di cultura e categoria merceologica, di un discorso molto più ampio, brillantemente affrontato dallo scrittore e critico letterario Francesco Roat nel suo libro “Desiderare invano. Il mito di Faust in Goethe e altrove”(Moretti & Vitali, Euro 14,00) che è stato recentemente presentato a Roma presso la libreria Aseq, (luogo meraviglioso da scoprire, in cui sostare e tornare, la cui anima è tangibile, un’ autentica cattedrale del sapere creata circa quaranta anni fa da Edoardo Quarantelli e Luca Nerazzini).

The Staufen roadhouse where the legend tells Faust sold his soul to Mephistopheles, into that room which is now wrapped by the leaves of a tree, photo by N

The Staufen roadhouse where the legend tells Faust sold his soul to Mephistopheles, into that room (n. 5) which is now wrapped by the leaves of a tree, photo by N

In questa occasione mi ha rallegrato incontrare e confrontarmi prima e durante l’ evento con l’ autore di questo libro. Francesco è stato molto generoso con me e con il pubblico che ha presenziato alla presentazione del libro, il cui titolo rimanda al leggendario dottor Faust, l’ uomo, medico e negromante che è vissuto nel tardo Medioevo e ha venduto la sua anima al diavolo in cambio di poteri soprannaturali, personificazione dell’ eccesso del desiderio. Mi piace ricordare il dramma di Marlowe “La storia tragica del dottor Faust” (“The tragical history of Doctor Faustus”), pur essendo plurime le rivisitazioni letterarie del personaggio, quella di Goethe resta però la più struggente e umana, un capolavoro della letteratura romantica. Un mito, quello di Faust, – come affermava Burckhardt -, “un’ immagine primordiale nella quale ogni essere umano può/deve saper cogliere la sua essenza e il suo destino”. Secondo André Neher tale immagine rappresenta il mito dell’ uomo moderno e anche Aldo Carotenuto, uno dei personaggi più rappresentativi dello junghismo, si orienta nel medesimo senso, ritenendo che sia opportuno “considerare quella di Faust come un’ immagine mitica dell’ inconscio collettivo che si incarnerà, di volta in volta nella struttura dell’ uomo contemporaneo, assumendone le sembianze, assorbendone i drammi e le inquietudini, trasformandosi così nel più stupefacente archetipo della modernità”. Un uomo che vuole avere tutto ed è punito perché voleva avere tutto. Questo sembrerebbe il grande dramma di Faust, ma non è così. Il mito dipinge il desiderio umano di totalità, di affrancarsi, come illustra Roat in modo chiaro, persuasivo e intellegibile, “da decreti divini/dogmatici, l’ urgenza di conoscere/esplorare la realtà nei suoi più intimi recessi, senza vincoli etici/religiosi di alcun genere, infine la tracotanza di tendere in modo inesausto/ossessivo a superare ogni limite dell’ umano”(idea che richiama l’ Übermensch, il Superuomo di Nietzsche, animato dalla volontà di potenza). Faust è anche “l’ anticonformista che vuole ogni piacere delibare, ogni istinto o voglia appagare”. Ciò – prosegue l’ autore – “rappresenta una utile chiave di lettura dell’ uomo occidentale post/tardo moderno che, incline al disincanto e deluso da ogni credo ideologico, appare sempre più individualista: monade imbozzolata nella sua chiusura all’ insegna di un narcisismo tendente alla reificazione dell’ altro da sé e tutto preso da una perenne tensione/fibrillazione desiderante”, ove non scivoli nella stasi depressiva, in un tedium vitae privo di passioni o peggio ancora in un nichilismo mortifero di un soggetto disamorato, ignavo e indifferente non solo al tu e a Dio, ma anche al proprio io”.

historie_gasthaus-zum-loewen-staufen

A memory impressed in the wall of Staufen Zum Löwen roadhouse telling about the deal between Faust and Mephistopheles

Giovinezza, amore, denaro, potere, questi i doni concessi da Mefistofele a Faust, desideri che animano anche la contemporaneità, uno tra tutti, il desiderio di prolungare la propria vita, poiché il dramma dell’ individuo, come afferma lo scrittore, nasce dalla finitudine della condizione umana, la consapevolezza di avere un inizio e una fine ovvero di morire, diversamente dagli animali, che non hanno consapevolezza della propria morte, ma soltanto di quella altrui. Ciò, un fatto, una realtà con cui tutti prima o dopo ci confrontiamo ovvero con la morte, dovrebbe essere invece un monito a vivere con gioia, pacificati con il nostro animo e con il mondo che ci circonda in questa breve vita, senza reprimere o annichilire il desiderio, prerogativa umana e moto propulsore della vita e del suo dinamismo, ma ancorandolo al principio di realtà, emancipandolo dalle illusioni ovvero dal desiderare invano – con le rinunce rispetto al principio del piacere che esso implica -, in cui “sensibilità e ragione restano l’ una a fianco dell’ altra e invitano l’ individuo al suo superamento”. “Contemplare il cielo e l’ ordine dell’ universo – e in pari tempo tendere a sollevarci per il tempo che ci è concesso – vuol dire abbracciare una visione della vita che sposti l’ accento sulla morte come legge di vita; vuol dire prendere consapevolezza dell’ impossibilità di ogni assoluto, eterno piacere. Vuol dire abbracciare i chiaroscuri di una persistente umbratilità”. Questo il cuore, il monito e insegnamento che si trae dalla lettura di questo libro – preziosa perla di saggezza per pensare e ripensarsi – e dal mito di Faust che non è punito da Dio, il quale sottrae al momento della morte la sua anima a Mefistofele e lo fa ascendere al cielo, poiché nonostante tutto “erra l’ uomo finché cerca”, affermava il Signore nel Prologo in cielo all’ inizio del Faust. E Dio pertanto è indulgente verso chi – come Faust – “ha fatto della tensione inesausta e mai paga verso la pienezza vitale, l’ assoluto, la conoscenza o in altri termini verso l’ alterità/ulteriorità rispetto a tutto quanto è ordinario, finito e noto la propria ragione di vita”.

6

Me, myself and I along with Edoardo Quarantelli and his wife at the Rome Aseq bookshop, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

 

www.aseq.it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

The Mexican fashion designer Jehsel Lau presented during the latest edition of Altaroma in the picturesque frame of the Rome Waldensian Church the high fashion collection “Aequilibrium” she made, being under the sign of technology and innovation. The designs are made by using a cloth embodying the technology Ecorepel® and making the garments waterproof. Many are the inspirations of the collections: the Chinese painting of bamboo and bonsai, symmetric cuts and Western silhouettes. It’s a search for a new balance of soul, what the collection talks about, which has made concrete through black and white, metaphor of the ideas meeting with themselves and turns into an entity, arising from this dynamism. The creations have presented by a performance made by young dancers who showed the dresses inside and out, then they dressed up on the stage, wearing every dress like a second skin. The event – promoted by the Mexico Embassy in Italy – featured an ethereal atmosphere, emphasized by the music by Mexican artists as the pianist Joel Juan Qui, the tenor José Manuel Chu, the soprano Jessica Loaiza, the dancers from the Dancing High School of Teramo and the Chorus from the Gregorian School Sacri Montis, giving rise to a suggestive dialogue between art and fashion.

ALTAROMA: LA MODA INCONTRA LA TECNOLOGIA, “AEQUILIBRIUM” DI JESHEL LAU    

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

La fashion designer messicana Jehsel Lau ha presentato in occasione dell’ ultima edizione di Altaroma nella pittoresca cornice della Chiesa Valdese di Roma  la collezione haute couture “Aequilibrium” da lei realizzata che è all’ insegna della tecnologia e innovazione. I disegni sono realizzati mediante l’ uso di un tessuto che incorpora la tecnologia Ecorepel® e rende i capi impermeabili. Molteplici sono le ispirazioni della collezione: la pittura cinese del bambù e bonsai, i tagli simmetrici e le silhouette occidentali. É la ricerca di un nuovo equilibrio dell’ anima ciò di cui parla la collezione, che è stato concretizzato dal bianco e nero, metafora delle idee che si incontrano e si trasformano in una nuova entità che nasce da questo dinamismo. Le creazioni sono state presentate da una performance in cui giovani ballerine mostravano la parte esterna e interna degli abiti, poi si vestivano in scena, indossando ogni abito come una seconda pelle. L’ evento – promosso dall’ Ambasciata del Messico in Italia – ha avuto quale protagonista un’ atmosfera eterea, enfatizzata dalle musiche di artisti messicani quali il pianista Joel Juan Qui, il tenore José Manuel Chu, la soprano Jessica Loaiza, le ballerine del Liceo Coreutico di Teramo e il Coro della Scuola Gregoriana Sacri Montis, dando vita a un suggestivo dialogo tra arte e moda.

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

 

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

 

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

 

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

 

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

Jeshel Lau, photo by L. Sorrentino/L.Piacevoli

 

 

www.altaroma.it

www.jehsellau.com

Ivonne Sciò, photo by Allucinazione

Ivonne Sciò, photo by Allucinazione

A tale paying homage to one relevant persona of fashion photography, Roxanne Lowit, who depicted culture, subcultures for three decades, giving rise to a new way to work as photographer, giving rise to a kind of reportage which turns into an artwork. That and much more as the tales by Giambattista Valli, David LaChapelle, Giorgio Armani, Jeremy Scott, Julian Schnabel, Pat Cleveland, Amanda Lepore and Heidi Klum is embodied into “Roxanne Lowit Magic Moment”, the documentary film, bright work which marks the debut of the actress Yvonne Sciò as director and producer and was recently screened during the latest edition of Altaroma, a smashing event under the sign of fashion culture.

ALTAROMA: LA PROIEZIONE DI “ROXANNE LOWIT MAGIC MOMENTS” DI YVONNE SCIÓ

Un racconto che rende omaggio a un emblematico personaggio della fotografia di moda, Roxanne Lowit, che ha immortalato la cultura e le subculture per tre decadi, dando vita a un nuovo modo di fare fotografia che si trasforma in un’ opera d’ arte. Questo e molto di più come le testimonianze di Giambattista Valli, David LaChapelle, Giorgio Armani, Jeremy Scott, Julian Schnabel, Pat Cleveland, Amanda Lepore ed Heidi Klum e racchiuso in “Roxanne Lowit Magic Moment”, la pellicola documentaristica, brillante lavoro che segna il debutto dell’ attrice Yvonne Sciò nelle vesti di regista e produttrice ed è stato recentemente proiettato in occasione dell’ ultima edizione di Altaroma, un formidabile evento all’ insegna della cultura della moda.

Ivonne Sciò, photo by Allucinazione

Ivonne Sciò, photo by Allucinazione

 

www.altaroma.it

Benedetta Bruzziches at the Laura Urbinati boutique, photo by Allucinazione

Benedetta Bruzziches at the Laura Urbinati boutique, photo by Allucinazione

The latest edition of Altaroma featured the event “Road to Style – Celebrating”, an experimental project made by Altaroma to promote the shopping streets and emerging creativity which was held in the Rome city centre at via Dell’ Oca and Via Della Penna, renowned street peopled by artists, poets and artisans. Here boutiques, concepts stores, ateliers, research and high craftsmanship factories joined for paying homage to the accessories designer Benedetta Bruzziches (who has been finalist of the talent-scouting award Who Is On Next in 2012). Artisanal Cornucopia, Cristina Bomba, Glam, Laura Urbinati, Mondelliani, Oliver & Co. and Patrizia Fabri By Antica Manifattura Cappelli successfully welcomed and told about the creative path of the designer, giving rise to an exhibition path including the first creations as well as the Spring/Summer collection 2016 she made that are under the sign of irony, craftsmanship and contemporary times.

ALTAROMA: “ROAD TO STYLE – CELEBRATING” BENEDETTA BRUZZICHES

Benedetta Bruzziches at the Laura Urbinati boutique, photo by Allucinazione

Benedetta Bruzziches at the Laura Urbinati boutique, photo by Allucinazione

L’ ultima edizione di Altaroma ha avuto quale protagonista l’ evento “Road to Style – Celebrating”, progetto sperimentale realizzato da Altaroma per valorizzare le vie dello shopping e la creatività emergente che si è tenuto nel centro storico di Roma presso via Dell’ Oca e Via Della Penna, rinomata strada popolata da artisti, poeti e artigiani. Ivi boutiques, concepts store, atelier, laboratori di ricerca e alto artigianato si sono uniti per rendere omaggio alla designer di accessori Benedetta Bruzziches (che è stata finalista del concorso di talent-scouting Who Is On Next nel 2012). Artisanal Cornucopia, Cristina Bomba, Glam, Laura Urbinati, Mondelliani, Oliver & Co. e Patrizia Fabri By Antica Manifattura Cappelli hanno felicemente accolto e raccontato l’ iter creativo della designer, dando vita a un percorso espositivo comprensivo delle prime creazioni ed anche della collezione primavera/estate 2016 da lei realizzata che sono all’ insegna di ironia, artigianalità e contemporaneità.

Benedetta Bruzziches at the Laura Urbinati boutique, photo by Allucinazione

Benedetta Bruzziches at the Laura Urbinati boutique, photo by Allucinazione

 

Laura Urbinati, photo by Allucinazione

Laura Urbinati, photo by Allucinazione

 

Laura Urbinati, photo by Allucinazione

Laura Urbinati, photo by Allucinazione

 

Benedetta Bruzziches at the atelier of milliner Patrizia Fabri By Antica Manifattura Cappelli, photo by Allucinazione

Benedetta Bruzziches at the atelier of milliner Patrizia Fabri By Antica Manifattura Cappelli, photo by Allucinazione

 

the milliner Patrizia Fabri, photo by Allucinazione

the milliner Patrizia Fabri, photo by Allucinazione

 

Benedetta Bruzziches at the atelier of Cristina Bomba, photo by Allucinazione

Benedetta Bruzziches at the atelier of Cristina Bomba, photo by Allucinazione

 

Benedetta Bruzziches at the atelier of Cristina Bomba, photo by Allucinazione

Benedetta Bruzziches at the atelier of Cristina Bomba, photo by Allucinazione

 

 

The atelier of Cristina Bomba, photo by Allucinazione

The atelier of Cristina Bomba, photo by Allucinazione

 

Benedetta Bruzziches at Artisanal Cornucopia, photo by Allucinazione

Benedetta Bruzziches at Artisanal Cornucopia, photo by Allucinazione

 

Elif Sallorenzo, the owner of Artisanal Cornucopia, photo by Allucinazione

Elif Sallorenzo, the owner of Artisanal Cornucopia, photo by Allucinazione

 

Artisanal Cornucopia, photo by Allucinazione

Artisanal Cornucopia, photo by Allucinazione

 

Benedetta Bruzziches, photo by Allucinazione

Benedetta Bruzziches, photo by Allucinazione

 

 

www.altaroma.it

www.benedettabruzziches.com

 

Luifi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Structure, romanticism and lightness features in the Spring/Summer 2016 high fashion collection by Luigi Borbone, presented at Rome during Altaroma, inspired by Orlando – the film by Sally Potter, interpreted by the iconic Tilda Swinton – and the myth of Persephone. It’s a successful melting-pot – emphasized by the styling of bright Concetta D’ Angelo – made of transparencies, light sporty-chic references, revisited in a romantic way, lace, silk, enriched by Swarovski crystals, light colors (as green, pink, sugar paper) along with blue and many lines reinterpreting the early Nineties, Fifties, Seventies and Eighties – as it is evidenced by the use of structures from Eighteenth century as the pannier -, pay homage to the silhouette and contemporary elegance.

ALTAROMA: IL ROMANTICISMO & LA LEGGEREZZA DI LUIGI BORBONE

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Struttura, romanticismo e levità sono i protagonisti della collezione haute couture primavera/estate 2016 di Luigi Borbone, presentata a Roma in occasione di Altaroma, che si ispira a Orlando – la pellicola di Sally Potter interpretata dall’ iconica Tilda Swinton – e al mito di Persefone. Un felice melting-pot – enfatizzato dallo styling della brillante Concetta D’ Angelo – fatto di trasparenze, lievi riferimenti sporty-chic, rivisitati in chiave romantica pizzo, seta, arricchita da cristalli Swarovski, colori tenui (quali verde, rosa, carta da zucchero) unitamente al blu e una pluralità di linee che reinterpretano i primi anni del Novecento, gli anni ’50, ’70 e ’80 – come si evince dall’ uso di strutture settecentesche quali il panier -, rendono omaggio alla silhouette ed alla femminilità contemporanea.

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

 

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

 

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

 

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

 

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

 

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

 

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

 

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

 

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

Luigi Borbone, Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Salvatore Dragone-Gianluca Palma-Luca Sorrentino

 

www.altaroma.it

www.luigiborbone.it

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Experimentation, reinterpretations and innovations, an atmosphere smelling of creativity, those are the main features of Talents 2016, fashion contest of the Rome Costume and Fashion Academy – which was held at the marvelous building of Rome Ex Dogana, place under the sign of industrial, metropolitan suggestions and contemporary times where took place the events curated by Altaroma – which featured the final works by the graduated students of the renowned fashion school headed by Lupo Lanzara and Adrien Yakimov Roberts as director of education, showed behind a jury of experts as Silvia Venturini Fendi (President of Altaroma), Carlo Capasa (President of the National Chamber of Italian Fashion), Laura Lusuardi (Max Mara Creative Director), Leonardo Pucci (Christian Dior) and many others. Ilaria Fiore won this edition, who has also awarded with a special prize for the accessories she made. The bright creative made a capsule collection joining sartorialism and experimentation, combines the cloth with leather, where the accessories or rather bags and belts become a fundamental part of dress (though they are removable). Lightness, minimalism, rebellion against family, father and dialectics of power is what the collection by Deniza Nugnes talks about, who – as she told me days ago, during the fitting of the fashion show which was held at the Costume & Fashion Academy – has inspired by the cultural revolution from 1968 and subverted the male wardrobe, its constructions giving rise to minimal essential garments and successful asymmetries. Many are the ideas on the move drawing new shapes and lines as the sphere becoming the fundamental idea of the collection by Andrea Maria di Salvo where white is the main features, which embodies many theatrical references.

 Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

 

ALTAROMA: I TALENTS 2016 DELL’ ACCADEMIA DI COSTUME & MODA DI ROMA

 Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Sperimentazione, reinterpretazioni e innovazioni, un’ atmosfera che profuma di creatività, questi i principali protagonisti di Talents 2016, il fashion contest dell’ Accademia Costume e Moda di Roma -che si è tenuto nei  meravigliosi spazi dell’ Ex Dogana di Roma, luogo all’ insegna di suggestioni industrial, metropolitane e contemporaneità  in cui hanno avuto luogo gli eventi curati da Altaroma – di cui sono stati protagonisti i final works degli studenti neo-diplomati nella rinomata scuola di moda diretta da Lupo Lanzara e da Adrien Yakimov Roberts nelle vesti di direttore didattico, che sono stati presentati dinanzi a una giuria di esperti quali Silvia Venturini Fendi (Presidente di Altaroma), Carlo Capasa (Presidente della Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana), Laura Lusuardi (Direttore Creativo di Max Mara), Leonardo Pucci (Christian Dior) e molti altri. Vincitrice di questa edizione è Ilaria Fiore, la quale è stata insignita anche di un premio speciale per gli accessori da lei realizzati. La brillante creativa ha creato una collezione capsule che unisce sartorialità e sperimentazione, abbina il tessuto alla pelle, in cui gli accessori ovvero borse e cinture diventano parte integrante dell’ abito (pur essendo rimovibili). Leggerezza, minimalismo e ribellione contro la famiglia e la dialettica del potere è ciò di cui parla la collezione di Deniza Nugnes, la quale -. come mi ha detto giorni fa, durante il fitting della sfilata che si è tenuto all’ Accademia di Costume e Moda – si è ispirata alla rivoluzione culturale del 1968 ed ha sovvertito il guardaroba maschile, le sue costruzioni dando vita a capi minimali e felici asimmetrie. Plurime le idee in movimento che disegnano nuove forme e linee quali la sfera che diventa il concetto fondante della collezione di Andrea Maria di Salvo in cui il bianco è il principale protagonista, la quale racchiude in sé plurimi riferimenti teatrali.

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

 

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

 

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

 

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

 

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

 

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

 

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

 

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

Ilaria Fiore, photo courtesy of Ilaria Fiore

 

Me, myself & I along with Fabiana Balestra, photo by Raffaella Scordino

Me, myself & I along with Fabiana Balestra, photo by Raffaella Scordino

 

Me, myself & I along with Ari Seth Cohen, photo by Raffaella Scordino

Me, myself & I along with Ari Seth Cohen, photo by Raffaella Scordino

 

 

Me, myself & I with Raffaella Scordino, photo by N

Me, myself & I with Raffaella Scordino, photo by N

 

Andrea Maria di Salvo, photo by Luca Sorrentino

Andrea Maria di Salvo, photo by Luca Sorrentino

 

Andrea Maria di Salvo, photo by Luca Sorrentino

Andrea Maria di Salvo, photo by Luca Sorrentino

 

Me, myself and I with Livia Risi, photo by Raffaella Scordino

Me, myself and I with Livia Risi, photo by Raffaella Scordino

 

Me, myself & I along with Enrico Quinto, photo by Raffaella Scordino

Me, myself & I along with Enrico Quinto, photo by Raffaella Scordino

 

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

 

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

 

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

 

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

 

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

 

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

 

The models at the backstage of fashion show wearing the creations by Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

The models at the backstage of fashion show wearing the creations by Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

 

A model at the backstage of fashion show wearing the creations by Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

A model at the backstage of fashion show wearing the creations by Deniza Nugnes, photo courtesy of Deniza Nugnes

 

Carlo Capasa at the backstage of fashion show, photo by N

Carlo Capasa at the backstage of fashion show, photo by N

 

Me, myself & I along with Deniza Nugnes at the backstage of fashion show, photo by N

Me, myself & I along with Deniza Nugnes at the backstage of fashion show, photo by N

 

Nicolas Garcia Bernal, the winner of Talents 2015 edition at the backstage of fashion show, wearing a creation he made, photo by N

Nicolas Martin Garcia, the winner of Talents 2015 edition at the backstage of fashion show, wearing a creation he made, photo by N

 

A student turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

A student of  Rome Costume & Fashion Academy  turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

 

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

 

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

 

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

 

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

 

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

 

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

A student of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy turned into model for a moment wearing the creation by Deniza Nugnes, photo by N

 

Deniza Nugnes and Ilaria Fiore at work during the fitting of Talents' 2016 fashion show, photo by N

Deniza Nugnes and Ilaria Fiore at work during the fitting of Talents’ 2016 fashion show, photo by N

 

Me. myself & I along with Adrien Yakimov Roberts at the Rome Costume & Fashion Academy, photo by N

Me. myself & I along with Adrien Yakimov Roberts at the Rome Costume & Fashion Academy, photo by N

 

 

www.accademiacostumeemoda.it

www.altaroma.it

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by N

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by N

The Goddess features in the Spring/Summer 2016 high fashion collection by Renato Balestra, recently presented during Altaroma. The bright couturier paid homage to the Classical Greece culture and more specifically to the myth Athena, goddess of the arts and wisdom. It’s a tale of elegance under the sign of fluid lines, white along with different shades of orange, pleated cloths, precious details as the golden embroideries, lace, enhancing the silhouette and drawing a solemn and refined femininity.

MITO & CLASSICITÀ: LA FLUIDA ELEGANZA DI RENATO BALESTRA

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by N

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by N

La dea è la protagonista della collezione haute couture Primavera/Estate 2016 di Renato Balestra, recentemente presentata durante Altaroma. Il brillante couturier ha reso omaggio alla cultura della Grecia classica e più specificamente ad Atena, dea delle arti e della sapienza. Un racconto di eleganza all’ insegna di linee fluide, bianco unitamente a diverse nuances di arancio, tessuti plissettati, dettagli preziosi quali i ricami dorati, pizzo che esaltano la silhouette e disegnano una solenne e sofisticata femminilità.

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by N

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by N

 

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

 

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

 

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by N

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by N

 

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Renato Balestra Spring/Summer 2016, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

 

Renato Balestra, photo by N

Renato Balestra, photo by N

 

A model at the backstage of Renato Balestra's fashion show, photo by N

A model at the backstage of Renato Balestra’s fashion show, photo by N

 

A model at the backstage of Renato Balestra's fashion show, photo by N

A model at the backstage of Renato Balestra’s fashion show, photo by N

 

Me, myself & I along with Giorgio Miserendino, photo by N

Me, myself & I along with Giorgio Miserendino, photo by N

 

www.renatobalestra.it

www.altaroma.it

Melampo, photo by N

Melampo, photo by N

Artisanal Intelligence (A.I.)”Body for the dress”, a nice showcase under the sign of art, fashion and craftsmanship, curated by Clara Tosi Pamphili and Alessio De’ Navasques  which was held during the Altaroma latest edition at the suggestive buildings of La Dogana – a huge industrial building – which yesterday hosted an ancient railway station, placed in the Rome area of San Lorenzo, the one which has resisted against the German attacks during the Second World War of whose tracks are still impressed in many buildings –  featured the works by visual artists as the bright Sacha Turchi, who made a sculpture evoking the spinal column, the structure of human body. Constructions, clear signs embodying visions as the ones by Giacomo Frasson and Giulia Roman, graduated students from the Fashion Design Faculty of Iuav University of Venice, as well as by Melampo, brand created by Lulù and Anna Poletti, Brighenti – renowned Rome boutique, which made the lingerie for actresses and showgirls – and others who have drawn an artistic path, successfully putting the light on the energies and ideas, featuring in the contemporary times where the new reads again the old to find a way to go, though the destination is still unknown.

ALTAROMA: A.I. “BODY FOR THE DRESS”, LA CELEBRAZIONE DEL CORPO TRA ARTE E MODA

Giacomo Frasson, photo by N

Giacomo Frasson, photo by N

Artisanal Intelligence (A.I.)”Body for the dress”, una simpatica rassegna sotto il segno di arte, moda e artigianalità, curata da Clara Tosi Pamphili e Alessio De’ Navasques che si è tenuta in occasione dell’ ultima edizione di Altaroma presso i suggestivi edifici de La Dogana – un enorme costruzione industriale  che ieri ha ospitato un’ antica stazione ferroviaria, ubicata nel quartiere romano di San Lorenzo, quello che ha resistito agli attacchi tedeschi durante la Seconda Guerra Mondiale, le cui tracce sono tuttora impresse in numerosi palazzi – ed ha avuto quali protagonisti i lavori di artisti come la brillante Sacha Turchi, la quale ha realizzato una scultura che evoca la colonna vertebrale, la struttura del corpo umano. Costruzioni, segni precisi che racchiudono in sé visioni quali quelle di Giacomo Frasson e Giulia Roman, studenti neo-laureati della Facoltà di Fashion Design dell’ Università Iuav di Venezia, come anche Melampo, brand creato da LulùAnna Poletti, Brighenti -rinomata boutique romana di lingerie di lusso, che ha realizzato biancheria intima per attrici e showgirl – ed altri che hanno tracciato un percorso artistico, gettando felicemente luce sulle energie e idee protagoniste della contemporaneità in cui il nuovo rilegge il vecchio per trovare una strada da intraprendere, pur essendo la destinazione ancora ignota.

Giulia Roman, photo by N

Giulia Roman, photo by N

 

Fabio Quaranta (fashion designer and professor at the Iuav University of Venice) along with Giacomo Frasson and Giulia Roman, photo by N

Fabio Quaranta (fashion designer and professor at the Iuav University of Venice) along with Giacomo Frasson and Giulia Roman, photo by N

 

Brighenti, photo by N

Brighenti, photo by N

 

Pictures evidencing the famous customers of Brighenti, photo by N

Pictures evidencing the famous customers of Brighenti, photo by N

 

Me, myself & I along with Sacha Turchi and the work she made, photo by N

Me, myself & I along with Sacha Turchi and the work she made, photo by N

 

www.altaroma.it