You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Christian Dior’ tag.

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo by N

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo by N

Sacredness, mysticism, embodied in the religious iconography meeting the profane, catchy rock suggestions start an overwhelming dialogue which is impressed in the precious silver alchemies by the bright Rome jewelry designer Marco de Luca. Incisiveness, fine craftmanship and lightness, a leitmotiv of his work featuring also in other creations he made that reinterpret animalier motifs as well as the rings from the early Nineties where silver substitutes the gem and its blaze, a successful game of constructions making concrete a brilliant manufacture and a timeless, sharp design – appreciate by personas from fashion, culture and art scene as the fashion designer, who is currently the creative director of Christian Dior, Maria Grazia Chiuri and the eclectic, iconic and visionary journalist and critic Roberto D’ Agostino -, giving rise to genuine passé-partout to collect, overlap, to give oneself as a gift that are available in Rome at the boutique Toko in via del Corallo 33, a nice place to discover, appreciate and where to come back.

 

SACRO, ROCK & PROFANO, LE PREZIOSE ALCHIMIE DI MARCO DE LUCA GIOIELLI

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo by N

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo by N

Sacralità, misticismo racchiuso nell’ iconografia di matrice religiosa che incontra il profano, accattivanti suggestioni rock avviano un avvincente dialogo che è impresso nelle preziose alchimie in argento del brillante designer di gioielli romano Marco de Luca. Incisività, fine artigianalità e levità, un leitmotiv della sua opera protagonista anche di altre creazioni da lui realizzate, le quali reinterpretano motivi animalier e gli anelli antichi di primo novecento in cui l’ argento ne sostituisce la pietra preziosa e il suo bagliore, un felice gioco di costruzioni che concretizza una brillante manifattura e un graffiante design senza tempo – tanto apprezzato da personaggi del mondo della moda, arte e cultura quali la fashion designer , attuale direttore creativo di Christian Dior, Maria Grazia Chiuri e l’ eclettico, iconico, visionario giornalista e critico Roberto D’ Agostino -, dando vita ad autentici passé-partout da collezionare, sovrapporre, regalarsi e regalare che sono in vendita a Roma presso la boutique Toko in via del Corallo 33, un simpatico luogo da scoprire, apprezzare e in cui tornare.

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo by N

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo by N

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo by N

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo by N

Me, myself & I at Toko boutique, photo by N

Me, myself & I at Toko boutique, photo by N

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo courtesy of Marco de Luca

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo courtesy of Marco de Luca

marco-18

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo courtesy of Marco de Luca

Maria Grazia Chiuri wearing a necklace by Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo courtesy of Marco de Luca

Maria Grazia Chiuri wearing a necklace by Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo courtesy of Marco de Luca

marco 19.png

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo courtesy of Marco de Luca

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo courtesy of Marco de Luca

Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo courtesy of Marco de Luca

Roberto D' Agostino wearing rings by Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo courtesy of Roberto D' Agostino

Roberto D’ Agostino wearing rings by Marco de Luca Gioielli, photo courtesy of Roberto D’ Agostino

Marco de Luca, photo courtesy of Marco de Luca

Marco de Luca, photo courtesy of Marco de Luca

http://marcodelucagioielli.com

suzy

It has recently held in London at Christie’s the sale of “In my fashion, the Suzy Menkes collection”, which included 95 items, Suzy Menkes’ clothes and accessories, made by the most renowned yesterday and today fashion houses as Ossie Clark, Hermès, Chanel, Louis Vuitton, Prada, Christian Lacroix, Versace, Missoni, Yves Saint Laurent, Van Cleef & Arpels, Christian Dior, Salvatore Ferragamo, Burberry, Marni, Emilio Pucci, Jean Muir, Janice Wainwright, Bill Gibb, Ossie Clark and Celia Birtwell. The auction sale included also a talk featuring Suzy Menkes, Jasper Conran along with two creatives from the new generation of fashion designers appreciated by the celebrated journalist of Herald Tribune, Erdem and Mary Katrantzou. Here Suzy focused on the emotional value of her garments, reminding of the necklace she wore in this circumstance which talked about a forty years old African woman who has started working doing that. The talk has documented by Showstudio, a video I am glad of sharing with you, dear FBFers which gives rise to a smashing journey through the fashion idea  and life of one of most relevants pen from fashion journalism, Suzy Menkes.

“IN MY FASHION, THE SUZY MENKES COLLECTION” IN VENDITA DA CHRISTIE’S

Suzy Menkes, photo by N

Suzy Menkes, photo by N

Si è recentemente tenuta a Londra da Christie’s la vendita di “In my fashion, the Suzy Menkes collection” che ha incluso 95 capi, abiti e accessori di Suzy Menkes, realizzati dalle più rinomate case di moda di ieri e oggi quali Ossie Clark, Hermès, Chanel, Louis Vuitton, Prada, Christian Lacroix, Versace, Missoni, Yves Saint Laurent, Van Cleef & Arpels, Christian Dior, Salvatore Ferragamo, Burberry, Marni, Emilio Pucci, Jean Muir, Janice Wainwright, Bill Gibb, Ossie Clark e Celia Birtwell. La vendita all’ asta ha incluso anche un talk con Suzy Menkes, Jasper Conran unitamente a due creativi della nuova generazione di fashion designers apprezzati dalla celebre giornalista dell’ Herald Tribune, Erdem and Mary Katrantzou. Ivi Suzy si è soffermata sul valore emozionale dei suoi abiti, ricordando la collana da lei indossata in quell’ occasione che parlava di una quarantenne Africana la quale aveva iniziato a lavorare facendo ciò. Il talk è stato documentato da Showstudio, un video che sono lieta di condividere con voi, cari FBFers, il quale dà vita a un formidabile viaggio attraverso l’ idea della moda e la vita di una delle più autorevoli penne del giornalismo di moda, Suzy Menkes.

www.christies.com

Sofia Gnoli, celebrated fashion journalist, historian, fashion curator and Professor released today her new book “Moda, dalla nascita della haute couture a oggi” (Carocci, 34,00 Euros), telling about the history of fashion from its rise to contemporary fashion, talking about the most important designers and changes arisen from the realm of fashion. A book to have, precious source of fashion culture, something should – during those dark times especially – be increased in Italy about which the bright author told, focusing on something I deeply agree with her: the recognition of full scientific dignity to fashion in Italy”.

What are the ten-day periods decades and creatives, featuring in your latest book do you think that have emblematically marked Italian fashion?

“It’s hard identifying one only ten-day period. I think every historical age had its own importance. The Thirties were fundamental for giving rise to the consciousness it could exist an Italian fashion being independent from the French one. It has been the time where it has created the National Institution of Fashion, the first public institution for supporting and promoting the Italian fashion, it has been the time of autarchy and genius inventions by Salvatore Ferragamo. Italian fashion during the Forties starts shamefully emerging with names as Marucelli, Fontana sisters, Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò, Fernanda Gattinoni. It has been in the following ten-year period, the Forties, resulting from the Hollywood on Tevere in Rome and the Pitti White Hall in Florence, the great international recognition of Italian style and the rise of fashion boutique with Emilio Pucci, etc. and so on, arriving after the mid-Sixties to the emerging made in Italy, evidencing every ten-day period had its own main features and innovations”.

What do you think of contemporary made in Italy – haute couture, ready-to-wear, demi.couture – and what are its main features?

“After a stop started in the Nineties where it didn’t feature a new generation of creatives, except phenomenons as Antonio Marras and Ennio Capasa, creator of Costume National, didn’t feature new great creatives, it arose from a new heterogeneous generation of Italian creatives in the first ten-day period of Twenty-first century. Someone, working as consultants or having worked as consultant for others brands, established their own brand as Marco De Vincenzo, Giambattista Valli and Sergio Zambon. Other ones became creative directors of renowned international names as Giannini (Gucci), Riccardo Tisci (Givenchy) e Marco Zanini (Rochas). Other ones also held their brand, being or being been creative director of famous brand: Tommaso Aquilano and Roberto Rimondi, Gabriele Colangelo, Francesco Scognamiglio. All of the names evidence how Italian creativity, due to its perfect balance between dream and reality, marketing and fantasy, continues being one of the most desirable ones”.

What are the project you are going to develop?

“The thing I care very much is to improve the culture of Italian fashion. I think our Country should focus on that much more. In fact the fashion in Italy, though it’s one of the biggest entries of turnover, is still  smugly considered in some universities, instead it’s very important. The fashion studies in Italy, comparing them with countries as England, USA and France, are very behind. Then the space given by institution to cultural events, concerning fashion is very little. Instead there are important museums abroad having fashion areas as the New York Metropolitan Museum of the Arts or London Victoria & Albert Museum. Unfortunately in Italy there isn’t anything like that. It’s very hard and dangerous setting up a fashion exhibition, though it’s a really charming work, in fact is one of my forthcoming projects. In fact here in Italy the scientific standards of this subject aren’t codified. I think it’s often forgotten fashion is not an issue about  ruffles and furbelows where everyone can improvise. Fashion is a more serious issue than is commonly considered…”.

“MODA. DALLA NASCITA DELLA HAUTE COUTURE A OGGI”, IL NUOVO LIBRO DI SOFIA GNOLI

Sofia Gnoli

Sofia Gnoli, celebre giornalista, storica della moda, fashion curator e docente ha pubblicato oggi il suo nuovo libro “Moda, dalla nascita della haute couture a oggi” (Carocci, 34,00 Euro) che narra la storia della moda dalla sua nascita alla moda contemporanea, parla dei più importanti designer e dei cambiamenti sorti nell’ ambito della moda. Un libro da avere, preziosa fonte di cultura della moda, qualcosa che dovrebbe essere incrementata – specialmente durante questi tempi oscuri – in Italia della quale la brillante autrice ha parlato, concentrandosi su qualcosa che condivido profondamente: il riconoscimento di piena dignità scientifica alla moda in Italia.

Quali sono le decadi e i creativi, protagonisti del tuo ultimo libro che ritieni abbiano segnato in modo emblematico la moda italiana?

“Difficile individuare un unico decennio. Trovo che ogni momento storico abbia avuto una sua importanza. Gli anni Trenta sono stati fondamentali per far nascere negli italiana la consapevolezza che una moda italiana indipendente da quella francese poteva esistere. Sono stati gli anni in cui è stato creato l’Ente Nazionale della Moda, la prima istituzione pubblica volta a sostenere e promuovere la moda italiana, sono stati gli anni dell’autarchia e delle geniali invenzioni di Salvatore Ferragamo. Negli anni Quaranta la moda italiana, con nomi come Germana Marucelli, Sorelle Fontana, Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò, Fernanda Gattinoni, inizia timidamente ad emergere. Nel decennio successivo, grazie alla Hollywood sul Tevere a Roma e alla Sala Bianca di Pitti a Firenze ci sono stati il grande riconoscimento internazionale dello stile italiano e l’affermarsi della moda boutique con Emilio Pucci, ecc. E così via per arrivare nella seconda metà dei Settanta all’emergente made in Italy. Insomma ogni decennio ha avuto le sue peculiarità e le sue innovazioni…”.

Cosa pensi del made in Italy contemporaneo – alta moda, pret-à-porter e demi-couture – e quali sono i suoi tratti più salienti?

“Dopo una battuta d’arresto iniziata negli anni Novanta, durante i quali, a parte i fenomeni di Antonio Marras ed Ennio Capasa, mente di Costume National, non si sono affermati nuovi grandi creativi, nel corso del primo decennio del Duemila è emersa una generazione di creatori italiani dal carattere eterogeneo. Alcuni, pur effettuando o avendo effettuato consulenze per altri marchi, hanno fondato una loro linea, è il caso di Marco De Vincenzo, Giambattista Valli e Sergio Zambon. Altri sono diventati direttori artistici di importanti griffe internazionali come Frida Giannini (Gucci), Riccardo Tisci (Givenchy) e Marco Zanini (Rochas). Altri ancora hanno mantenuto la loro linea pur essendo o essendo stati art director di noti brand: Tommaso Aquilano e Roberto Rimondi, di Gabriele Colangelo, Francesco Scognamiglio. Tutti nomi che dimostrano come la creatività italiana, per il suo perfetto equilibrio tra realtà e sogno, tra marketing e fantasia, continui a essere tra le più ambite”.

Quali sono i progetti che hai in cantiere?

“Valorizzare la cultura della moda italiana è la cosa che mi sta più a cuore. Trovo che il nostro Paese dovrebbe concentrarsi sempre più in questo senso. In Italia infatti, nonostante sia una delle voci più ingenti del fatturato, la moda è ancora guardata con una certa sufficienza in alcuni ambiti accademici, mentre invece è importantissima. Da noi i fashion studies, rispetto a paesi quali l’Inghilterra, gli Stati Uniti e la Francia, sono molto indietro. Inoltre lo spazio che le istituzioni concedono a iniziative culturali concernenti la moda è molto ridotto. Mentre all’estero ci sono importanti musei con sezioni di moda, è il caso del Metropolitan Museum of the Arts di New York o del Victoria & Albert Museum di Londra. In Italia purtroppo non abbiamo nulla del genere. Inoltre, anche se fare una mostra di moda è senz’altro affascinante, non a caso è uno dei miei prossimi progetti, è molto difficile e pericoloso. Da noi infatti i parametri scientifici di questa disciplina sono ancora poco codificati. Trovo che ci si dimentichi un po’ troppo spesso che la moda non è una questione di volants e falpalà, dove chiunque si può improvvisare. La moda è una cosa molto più seria di quanto si pensi…”.

Crocera Lloyd, Illustrazione Italiana, 6th August 1963

Salvatore Ferragamo and Joan Crawford, 1923, courtesy of Salvatore Ferragamo

Christian Dior along with his collaborators in Avenue Montaigne, courtesy of Christian Dior

Sketch by Capucci, 2011, courtesy of Capucci Foundation

Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò trying a dress for Theo Graham, 1961, photo Leombuno Bodi, courtesy of Archivio Saraceni

Kim Novak wearing a dress by Fernanda Gattinoni, 1957, courtesy of Gattinoni archive

Giuliana Cohen Camerino and Salvador Dalì, 1974, courtesy of Roberta di Camerino archive

Antonia Dell'Atte Fall/Winter 1984-1985, photo by Aldo Fallai, courtesy of Giorgio Armani

Sketch by Gianfranco Ferrè haute-couture Fall/Winter 1986-1987, courtesy of Gianfranco Ferré Foundation

Antonio Marras Spring/Summer 1988, courtesy of Antonio Marras

 

Liz Hurley at the set of “Bedazzled” (2000) wearing the Baguette by Fendi, courtesy of Fendi

 

Prada Spring/Summer 1996, courtesy of Prada