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photo by N

photo by N

It’ s a modern day, a Sunday afternoon spent under the sign of fashion, high fashion and art. “To live with art”, categorical imperative of high fashion and Italy during the years 1945-1968. That is the core of “Bellissima. The Italy of high fashion 1945-1968”, exhibition opened on Sunday 30th November 2014 in Rome(where it was also held during the same day at the Auditorium della Musica the concert of legendary band of industrial music Einstuerzende Neubauten, a missed appointment) at the MAXXI Museum – running through 3rd May 2015 -, curated by Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi and Anna Mattirolo, organized in collaboration with Altaroma and Bulgari which is its main partner.

Roland Sejko, Simmetries of light Vol. III. courtesy Istituto Luce Cinecittà Srl

Roland Sejko, “Simmetries of light Vol. III”. Istituto Luce Cinecittà Srl, photo by N

Dresses by Germana Marucelli( Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Germana Marucelli archive),  and Roberto Capucci(1967, courtesy Roberto Capucci Archive) along with the artworks "Inter-ena-cubo", by Paolo Scheggi(1969, Carla and Cosimo Scheggi collection)

Dresses by Germana Marucelli( Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Germana Marucelli archive), and Roberto Capucci(1967, courtesy Roberto Capucci Archive) along with the artworks “Inter-ena-cubo”, by Paolo Scheggi(1969, Carla and Cosimo Scheggi collection), photo by N

Bulgari, the jewelry featuring in the "Snakes" collection(1965) Bulgari Heritage collection), photo by N

Bulgari, the jewelry featuring in the “Snakes” collection(1965) Bulgari Heritage collection), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( evening dress with bodice and belt in anodized aluminum, designed in collaboration with the artist Getulio Alviani, Alluminio collection, Spring/Summer 1969, private collection) and Emilio Pucci( lurex evening dress with jewelry clasp, Spring/Summer 1967, Emilio Pucci Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( evening dress with bodice and belt in anodized aluminum, designed in collaboration with the artist Getulio Alviani, Alluminio collection, Spring/Summer 1969, private collection) and Emilio Pucci( lurex evening dress with jewelry clasp, Spring/Summer 1967, Emilio Pucci Archive), photo by N

Getulio Alviani, "Forma"(1961, private collection, Pescara), photo by N

Getulio Alviani, “Forma”(1961, private collection, Pescara), photo by N

A story of art and poetry, the story of a nation, the Italy and its creativity, also impressed in the pages of a wonderful book which is much more than a catalogue of an exhibition, it’s an anthological work, full of documents, signs and visions that reorganize and rebuild an age in a syncretic way, giving rise to a red drop with the ready to wear from the following decades, the demi-couture and the contemporary creative language. And Rome, city which yesterday gave rise to these many creative alchemies, open dialogues and blends between art, film and fashion, becomes today its witness. All happens in an afternoon and finally in a museum. An important signal of a renovated sharing between art and fashion, representing a new way, a necessary dialogue between institutions and consequently a rediscovered dignity of fashion – emancipated from the prejudices, often considered only as consumer goods – which is a discipline, a source of culture having the same rank of the visual arts (a dignity recognized from a long time elsewhere or rather in many worldwide museums), hosted now by the place where it must be: the museum.

Federico Forquet( silk Evening jumpsuit with sequins owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, about 1967-1968, Courtesy Galleria del Costume di Palazzo Pitti - Donazione Tirelli), photo by N

Federico Forquet( silk evening jumpsuit with sequins owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, about 1967-1968, Courtesy Galleria del Costume di Palazzo Pitti – Donazione Tirelli) and Galitzine(Evening Pyjama, made of fringed jersey with braiding, crystals and glass beads, Fall/Winter 1960-1961, Label: Irene Galitzine Rome; label: Neiman Marcus), photo by N

Tiziani, designed by Karl Lagerfeld (evening dress made of silk crêpon, embroidered with glass beads, owned by Catherine Spaak, Fall/Winter 1967/1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti’s Galleria del Costume –Donazione Tirelli), photo by N

Tiziani, designed by Karl Lagerfeld (evening dress made of silk crêpon, embroidered with glass beads, owned by Catherine Spaak, Fall/Winter 1967/1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery –Donation by Tirelli), photo by N

Mila Schön, silk organza evening gown embroidered with medallions of pearls, rhinestones and sequins, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Fashion house Mila Schön’s Archive), photo by N

Mila Schön, (silk organza evening gown embroidered with medallions of pearls, rhinestones and sequins, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Fashion house Mila Schön’s Archive), photo by N

 Mila Schön (tulle evening dress, embroidered with beads, owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, courtesy  Palazzo Pitti  Costume Gallery- Tirelli donation), photo by N


Mila Schön (tulle evening dress, embroidered with beads, owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery- Donation by Tirelli), photo by N

Germana Marucelli(evening dress with sequins and silk embroidery from patterns by Pietro Zuffi, "Impero" collection, 1967, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive) and Jole Veneziani (organza short dress embroidered with stripes, sequins and jais, Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Veneziani Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli(evening dress with sequins and silk embroidery from patterns by Pietro Zuffi, “Impero” collection, 1967, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive) and Jole Veneziani (organza short dress embroidered with stripes, sequins and jais, Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Veneziani Archive), photo by N

It’s a present full of promises and energies, though it’s different from the past which exhibition tells about, from which it arises the modernity of signs, and emotions of the many stories impressed on the cloth. Shapes, spaces, colors and avant-garde suggestions, as well as craftsmanship tracing the DNA of Made in Italy and Italian fashion industry which is born yesterday as elitist and sartorial phenomenon. The couturier is the interpret and demiurge, decoding the suggestions coming from his time. Eternal works, iconic clothes, the ones by Germana Marucelli, Galitizine and Fontana Sisters, masterpieces of experimentation and irony as the lapin jumpsuit by Fendi, the dresses by Capucci and Emilio Schuberth show a fashion going beyond time. Architectures draw the femininity, made of matter, shape and colors becoming the references of exhibition. Black and white, cocktail and evening dresses, futuristic tensions and unusual lines. 80 are the clothes on show along with many accessories – including the celebrated creations by Roberta di Camerino, Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Dal Cò -, the jewelry by Bulgari and fashion jewelry by Coppola and Coppo telling about this vibrant age and do that by using other channels of communications: contemporary art, film and photography.

Galitzine( silk shantung Pyjama with shirt fully embroidered  with gold leaves and glass crystals, trousers with the same polka dot embroidered motif, 1962, label: Irene Galitzine, Rome, courtesy Galitzine Archive), photo by N

Galitzine( silk shantung Pyjama with shirt fully embroidered with gold leaves and glass crystals, trousers with the same polka dot embroidered motif, 1962, label: Irene Galitzine, Rome, courtesy Galitzine Archive), photo by N

Catalogues and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

Catalogues and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Fragiacomo( 1960, courtesy Fragiacomo) and Cavallera(1950, Courtesy City of Venice Museums - Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Fragiacomo( 1960, courtesy Fragiacomo) and Cavallera(1950, Courtesy City of Venice Museums – Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Valentino ( tulle short evening dress featuring drapes giving rise to roses, Spring/Summer 1959, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Valentino ( tulle short evening dress featuring drapes giving rise to roses, Spring/Summer 1959, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Alberto Burri, "Rosso plastica"(1961, private collection), photo by N

Alberto Burri, “Rosso plastica”(1961, private collection), photo by N

A wide setup of documents tells on film about the atmospheres of age, emphasized by the movies of legendary filmmakers as Luchino Visconti – “Bellissima”, the movie he made, is the title of exhibition -, Federico Fellini, film documentaries and photography by Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla and Ugo Mulas. The masterpieces by Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri highlight the thematic areas of exhibition path. The red dress by Valentino is matched to a work by Alberto Burri, the optical patterns by Alberto Biasi dialogue with the dress by Germana Marucelli and many others, creating a dynamic path made of lines, curves, successful asymmetries and divagations, made concrete by the set design of exhibition, a metallic path being at the wide room of MAXXI hosting it at the second floor, made by the bright architects  Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo and Guido Schinklert, makers of an experiential path, subverting the limits of space of a sole room and making usable and light an exhibition path which otherwise could become very hard and less intelligible.

Alberto Burri, "Ferro"(1960, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Alberto Burri, “Ferro”(1960, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Simonetta(two-pieces cocktail dress, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Simonetta(two-pieces cocktail dress, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Me,myself and I along wiith Adrien Yakimov, photo by N

Me,myself and I along wiith Adrien Yakimov, photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(cocktail dress,  owned by Lucy D' Albert, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(cocktail dress, owned by Lucy D’ Albert, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Marcello Mastroianni ft. in the movie "8 1/2" by Federico Fellini, photo by N

Marcello Mastroianni ft. in the movie “8 1/2” by Federico Fellini, photo by N

A motion featuring also in the mannequins by La Rosa, women – as it teaches the genius Diana Vreeland in her work as curator – and ideas on the move. Beauty and femininity, a complex talk, made of textures – as the fragments of cloths and embroideries by Fontana Sisters – and retraced by catalogues, magazines and a copious mail, precious documents telling about the relationships between the buyers, customers and ateliers, the rise of fashion industry, fashion show as event presenting and selling the fashion product (which happens for the first time on 22nd July 1952 in Florence at the Palazzo Pitti White Room).

Evening dresses by Roberto Capucci(“Azalea rosa”dress, Roberto Capucci, first show,  Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, 1961,Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), Valentino(evening dress in hand-painted sillk satin, Spring/Summer 1968, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.) and Emilio Schuberth(evening gown in silk satin with silk embroidery and glass beads,1951, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private collection), photo by N

Evening dresses by Roberto Capucci(“Azalea rosa”dress, Roberto Capucci, first show, Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, 1961,Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), Valentino(evening dress in hand-painted sillk satin, Spring/Summer 1968, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.) and Emilio Schuberth(evening gown in silk satin with silk embroidery and glass beads,1951, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private collection), photo by N

Video documenting "La settimana Incom( 1947), photo by N

Video documenting “La settimana Incom( 1947), photo by N

Botti Sisters(Evening dress in silk faille and rebrodè lace, 1957, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection) and Fontana Sisters(evening dress in damask silk with rose motifs and panel secured to the back, inspired by the traditional Japanese clothes, owned by Palma Bucarelli, 1957, courtesy Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Botti Sisters(evening dress in silk faille and rebrodè lace, 1957, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection) and Fontana Sisters(evening dress in damask silk with rose motifs and panel secured to the back, inspired by the traditional Japanese clothes, owned by Palma Bucarelli, 1957, courtesy Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Bulgari ( gold necklace with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967,  gold earrings with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, "Melone" gold vanity case with diamonds, 1960, Bulgari Heritage Collection), photo by N

Bulgari ( gold necklace with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, gold earrings with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, “Melone” gold vanity case with diamonds, 1960, Bulgari Heritage Collection), photo by N

Bulgari,  photo by N

Bulgari, photo by N

A happening enriched by the performance of artist Vanessa Beecroft, known for her semiotic affiliation with the fashion world, who staged exclusively for the event VB74, a tableau vivant made of women wrapped by veils, depicting and looking into femininity, the being and its clothing. A cooled, stripped idea which becomes abstract and embodies that catchy aesthetics which made famous the artist. An art which represents itself and answers to the questions of being through the silence of body and matter, the veil, lights and shadows. A “staged” idea revealing the essence by itself.

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Vanessa Beecroft talking with the professor Monica Bolzoni, photo by N

Vanessa Beecroft talking with the professor Monica Bolzoni, photo by N

Essence of the non-existent, that being non-existent which represents the individual seen by Carmelo Bene, though it’s not obscene, out of the stage, but it is and stays in the stage for three hours, the duration of performance which was also held on 28th November at the MAXXI for the gala dinner of exhibition for the MAXXI’s fund-raising, event where generously fashion supported art, calling its most famous features along with a plethora of more and less famous personas, known in the socialite news sections who, happy and cash, contributed to the success of evening – widely told by the website Dagospia of brilliant and ironic journalist Roberto D’ Agostino -, a fund-raising amounting to about 600.000 Euros (for an institution which – as many others Italian museums is not very well -, suffering since months, circumstances which is often told by news, resulting from the moment of precariousness and uncertainty the culture in Italy, its country and people experience).

Fontana Sisters( embroideries on cloth, 1949, 1964, 1953, Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Fontana Sisters( embroideries on cloth, 1949, 1964, 1953, Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Fernanda Gattinoni( short evening dress in moiré silk with velved and satin, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, evening cape in velvet with satin lining, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, two pieces evening dress, trousers in marocain crêpe silk  and blouse in silk organza, work by Anna Magnani, 1956, Historical Archive Fernanda and Raniero Gattinoni), photo by N

Fernanda Gattinoni( short evening dress in moiré silk with velved and satin, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, evening cape in velvet with satin lining, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, two pieces evening dress, trousers in marocain crêpe silk and blouse in silk organza, work by Anna Magnani, 1956, Historical Archive Fernanda and Raniero Gattinoni), photo by N

Ava Gardner wearing the “Pretino” dress, (created for her by the Fontana Sisters, "Pretino" dress, 1955, courtesy Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Ava Gardner wearing the “Pretino” dress, (created for her by the Fontana Sisters, “Pretino” dress, 1955,
courtesy Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Salvatore Ferragamo( décolleté shoe made in glided kid, made for Marylin Monroe for the movie by Joshua Logan "Bus stop", 1967,  décolleté shoe in satin with rhinestones appliques and stiletto heel,owned by Marylin Monroe, 1958-1959, décolleté show made of crocodile leather created for Marilyn Monroe, 1958-1959, "Damigella" ankle boot in stretch brocade-effect silk fabric, created for Sophia Loren, 1957, "Madonna", closed-toe sandal with vamp bearing flowers embroidered in silk, glass beads and rhinestones, created for Sophia Loren, 1955, "Ranina" sandal with upper in Tavernelle lace and sequin appliqués, lining in transparent vinilite, flared  Louis XV heel, made for Anna Magnani, 1955, Courtesy Salvatore Ferragamo Museum), photo by N

Salvatore Ferragamo( décolleté shoe made in glided kid, made for Marylin Monroe for the movie by Joshua Logan “Bus stop”, 1967, décolleté shoe in satin with rhinestones appliques and stiletto heel,owned by Marylin Monroe, 1958-1959, décolleté show made of crocodile leather created for Marilyn Monroe, 1958-1959, “Damigella” ankle boot in stretch brocade-effect silk fabric, created for Sophia Loren, 1957, “Madonna”, closed-toe sandal with vamp bearing flowers embroidered in silk, glass beads and rhinestones, created for Sophia Loren, 1955, “Ranina” sandal with upper in Tavernelle lace and sequin appliqués, lining in transparent vinilite, flared Louis XV heel, made for Anna Magnani, 1955, Courtesy Salvatore Ferragamo Museum), photo by N

Mingolini Guggenheim, short evening dress in organza, owned by Silvana Pampanini, late 1960, Courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery - Tirelli Donation) and Fausto Sarli ( short evening dress in fabric embroidered with pearls, Swarovski crystals and glass baguettes designed for Mina ft. in the "Studio Uno" TV program, mid-1960, courtesy Atelier Sarli Couture), photo by N

Mingolini Guggenheim, short evening dress in organza, owned by Silvana Pampanini, late 1960, Courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery – Tirelli Donation) and Fausto Sarli ( short evening dress in fabric embroidered with pearls, Swarovski crystals and glass baguettes designed for Mina ft. in the “Studio Uno” TV program, mid-1960, courtesy Atelier Sarli Couture), photo by N

That is also a positive sign, I hope it’s the beginning of a new dialogue being more productive, deep and solid between the museums and the fashion world to develop in a long term period and build new ways, sow ideas looking at the culture as food for Italy and its minds, what makes us thinking, autonomous and free, a kind of food being necessary and universal. I also wish that is the first step for making a series of exhibitions on fashion that are – not set up sporadically and hopefully not set up in a sole, though it’s wide, room – set up in the Italian museums (telling that I think about the exhibition which during this year celebrated the Made in Italy in London, at the Victoria & Albert Museum and I also think about the new technologies to use to make more complete and understandably the tale of an exhibition).

UNA GIORNATA MODERNA: L’ INAUGURAZIONE DI “BELLISSIMA. L’ ITALIA DELL’ ALTA MODA 1945-1968” AL MUSEO MAXXI DI ROMA

Federico Garolla(two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking in steps of Central State Archive, Rome, 1958), photo by N

Federico Garolla(two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking in steps of Central State Archive, Rome, 1958), photo by N

Una giornata moderna, una domenica pomeriggio passata all’ insegna della moda, dell’ alta moda e dell’ arte. “Vivere con arte”, imperativo categorico dell’ alta moda e l’ Italia durante gli anni 1945-1968. Questo il cuore di “Bellissima”, mostra inaugurata domenica 30 novembre 2014 a Roma (in cui si è anche tenuto nello stesso giorno all’ Auditorium della Musica il concerto della leggendaria band di musica industrial Einstuerzende Neubauten, un appuntamento mancato) presso il MAXXI – che prosegue fino al 3 maggio 2015 -, curata da Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi e Anna Mattirolo, organizzata in collaborazione con Altaroma e Bulgari che ne è il main partner.

Emilio Schuberth(tulle dress, decorated with beads and sequins in floral motifs, worn by Gina Lollobrigida, about 1953, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection), photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(tulle dress, decorated with beads and sequins in floral motifs, worn by Gina Lollobrigida, about 1953, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection), photo by N

Fendi (Jumpsuit in black rabbit, with diagonally symmetric pattern, adorned with jewel buttons, chiffon and lace on the collar and wrists, Fall/Winter 1067-1968, Fendi Historical Archive) and Valentino (ensemble in cotton mikado, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Fendi (Jumpsuit in black rabbit, with diagonally symmetric pattern, adorned with jewel buttons, chiffon and lace on the collar and wrists, Fall/Winter 1067-1968, Fendi Historical Archive) and Valentino (ensemble in cotton mikado, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Fendi (mink coat, 1960, Fendi historical archive), photo by N

Fendi (mink coat, 1960, Fendi historical archive), photo by N

"Bellissima", fashion and the art by Lucio Fontana( "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli)" 1968, private collection, Rome), photo by N

“Bellissima”, fashion and the art by Paolo Scheggi (“Zone riflessse”, 1963,  National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Paolo Scheggi “Zone riflesse”( 1963, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome),

Una storia d’ arte e di poesia, la storia di una nazione, l’ Italia e della sua creatività, impressa anche nelle pagine di un libro che è più di un catalogo di una mostra,opera antologica da avere, colma di documentazioni, segni, visioni che riordinano e costruiscono un’ epoca in chiave sincretica, dando vita a un “fil rouge” con il prêt à porter dei decenni successivi, il demi-couture e il linguaggio creativo contemporaneo. E Roma, città che ha dato vita ieri a queste plurime alchimie creative, dialoghi aperti e contaminazioni tra arte, cinema e moda, ne diventa oggi la testimone. Accade tutto in un pomeriggio e finalmente in un museo. Un segnale importante di una rinnovata condivisione tra arte e moda, simbolo di una nuova strada, un necessitato dialogo tra istituzioni e conseguentemente una ritrovata dignità della moda – emancipata dai pregiudizi, sovente considerata unicamente quale bene di consumo -, la quale è una disciplina, una fonte di cultura di egual rango a quello delle arti visive(una dignità riconosciuta da tempo altrove ovvero in plurime istituzioni museali di tutto il mondo), ospite adesso del luogo in cui deve stare: il museo.

Enzo( dress, early 1960,  courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli collection) and Capucci ( Sculpture-dress in satin organza, Box line, 1958, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Enzo( dress, early 1960, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli collection) and Capucci ( Sculpture-dress in satin organza, Box line, 1958, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Lucio Fontana( "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli)" 1968, private collection, Rome), photo by N

Paolo Scheggi “Zone riflesse”( 1963, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Giuseppe Capogrossi, "Superficie 294"( 1958, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Giuseppe Capogrossi, “Superficie 294″( 1958, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

The magazines and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

The magazines and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Un presente ricco di promesse e di energie, di certo diverso dal passato che la mostra racconta, da cui però si evince l’ attualità di segni ed emozioni di tante storie impresse su tessuto. Forme, spazi, colori e suggestioni avveniristiche, ma anche artigianalità che traccia il dna del Made in Italy e dell’ industria della moda italiana che nasce ieri quale fenomeno elitario e sartoriale. Il couturier è l’ interprete e il demiurgo del suo tempo, decodifica in segni e visioni le suggestioni del suo presente. Opere immortali, abiti iconici, quelli di Germana Marucelli, Galitizine e delle Sorelle Fontana, capolavori di sperimentazione e di ironia come la tuta di lapin di Fendi, gli abiti di Capucci e di Emilio Schuberth, che testimonia una moda che va al di là del tempo. Architetture disegnano la femminilità fatta di materia, forma e colori che diventano i riferimenti della mostra. Il bianco e nero, gli abiti da cocktail e da gran sera, le tensioni futuristiche e le forme insolite. 80 sono gli abiti unitamente a plurimi accessori – che comprendono le celebri creazioni di Roberta di Camerino, Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Dal Cò -, i gioielli di Bulgari e la bigiotteria di Coppola e Coppo che raccontano questa vibrante epoca e lo fanno avvalendosi di altri canali di comunicazione: l’ arte contemporanea, il cinema e la fotografia.

The catalogues and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

The catalogues and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Fontana Sisters( 1960, A.N.G.E.L.O Vintage Archive) and Mila Schön ( 1960, private collection), photo by N

Fontana Sisters( 1960, A.N.G.E.L.O Vintage Archive) and Mila Schön ( 1960, private collection), photo by N

 Pasquale De Antonis(1947), photo by N

Pasquale De Antonis(1947), photo by N

Roberta di Camerino( early and mid 1960. courtesy A.N.G.E.L.O. Vintage Archive), photo by N

Roberta di Camerino( early and mid 1960. courtesy A.N.G.E.L.O. Vintage Archive), photo by N

Un ampio apparato documentaristico racconta su pellicola le atmosfere di un epoca e le visioni, enfatizzate dal segno di leggendari registi quali Luchino Visconti – il cui film “Bellissima” è il titolo della mostra -, Federico Fellini, da documentari e dalle fotografie di Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla e Ugo Mulas. I capolavori di Fontana, Burri enfatizzano le aree tematiche del percorso della mostra. L’ abito rosso di Valentino abbinato a un’ opera di Burri, i motivi optical di Alberto Biasi dialogano con l’ abito di Germana Marucelli e molti altri, creando un percorso dinamico, fatto di linee e curve, felici asimmetrie e divagazioni, concretizzate dal set design della mostra, un sentiero metallico presso la grande sala del MAXXI che la ospita al secondo piano, realizzato dai brillanti architetti Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo e Guido Schinklert, fautori di un cammino esperienziale che sovverte i limiti dello spazio ovvero di un’ unica sala e rende fruibile e lieve un percorso espositivo che altrimenti sarebbe potuto divenire oltremodo arduo e poco intellegibile.

Gucci ( Courtesy Gucci Archive), photo by N

Gucci ( courtesy Gucci Archive), photo by N

Alberto Fabiani(reversible wool day overcoat, Spring/Summer 1961, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection) and Pino Lancetti( Wool coat with silk liningm Spring/Summer 1965, City of Venice Museums Foundation- Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Alberto Fabiani(reversible wool day overcoat, Spring/Summer 1961, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection) and Pino Lancetti( Wool coat with silk liningm Spring/Summer 1965, City of Venice Museums Foundation- Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Magazines ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

Magazines ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Un moto impresso anche nei manichini di La Rosa, donne – come insegna Diana Vreeland nelle vesti di curatrice – e idee in movimento. Bellezza e femminilità, un discorso complesso, fatto di molteplici textures – come i frammenti di tessuti e ricami delle Sorelle Fontana – e rievocate da cataloghi, riviste e da una fitta corrispondenza, preziosa documentazione che racconta i rapporti tra i buyer, i clienti e gli atelier, la nascita dell’ industria della moda, della sfilata quale evento di presentazione e vendita del prodotto moda (che avviene per la prima volta il 22 luglio 1952 a Firenze nella Sala Bianca di Palazzo Pitti).

Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Cocktail dress in silk twill with optical motifs, designed by teaming with Getulio Alviani, "Optical collection", Spring/Summer, 1965, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Cocktail dress in silk twill with optical motifs, designed by teaming with Getulio Alviani, “Optical collection”, Spring/Summer, 1965, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Lucio Fontana  "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli) -1968, private collection, Rome,- and Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Lucio Fontana
“Concetto Spaziale – Attese (bianco e due tagli) – 1968, private collection, Rome – and Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Valentino( silk evening pyjama, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A,) and Roberto Capucci, "Omaggio a Vasarely", sculpture-dress inspired by the artist's works with interwoven optical effect satin ribbons and ostrich feathers, 1965, Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Valentino( silk evening pyjama, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A,) and Roberto Capucci, “Omaggio a Vasarely”, sculpture-dress inspired by the artist’s works with interwoven optical effect satin ribbons and ostrich feathers, 1965, Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Un happening arricchito dalla performance dell’ artista Vanessa Beecroft, nota per le sue affiliazioni semiotiche con il mondo della moda, che ha messo in scena per l’ occasione VB74, un tableau vivant fatto di donne avvolte da veli che ritrae e indaga la femminilità, l’ essere e il suo vestimentum. Un’ idea refrigerata, scarnificata che diventa astratta e racchiude in sé quell’ accattivante estetica che ha reso famosa l’ artista. Un’ arte che rappresenta sé stessa e risponde agli interrogativi dell’ essere con il silenzio di corpo e materia, il velo, luci e ombre. Un concetto “staged” che svela in sé la sua essenza.

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Giampiero Mughini, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Giampiero Mughini, photo by N

L’ essenza dell’ inesistente, di quell’ inesistente essente che rappresenta l’ individuo visto da Carmelo Bene, che però non è osceno, fuori scena, ma è e resta in scena per tre ore, durata della performance che si è tenuta anche il 28 novembre al Maxxi in occasione della cena di gala della mostra per la raccolta fondi del MAXXI, evento in cui la moda ha generosamente sostenuto l’ arte, chiamando a sé i suoi più famosi protagonisti unitamente a una pletora di personaggi più e meno noti nelle cronache mondane che, felici e contanti, hanno contribuito al successo della serata – ampiamente raccontata dal sito web Dagospia del brillante e ironico giornalista Roberto D’ Agostino -, una raccolta fondi pari a circa 600.000 Euro (per una istituzione che – come tante altre istituzioni museali italiane – non versa in condizioni felici, soffrendo da mesi, circostanza raccontata da cronache giornalistiche, per il periodo di precarietà e incertezza in cui versa la cultura in Italia, la stessa nazione e la sua popolazione).

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Stefano Tonchi and Maria Luisa Frisa talking with a friend, photo by N

Stefano Tonchi and Maria Luisa Frisa talking with a friend, photo by N

Anche questo è un segnale positivo, che spero sia l’ inizio di un nuovo dialogo più costruttivo, profondo e solido tra le istituzioni museali e il mondo della moda che si sviluppi nel lungo periodo e costruisca nuove vie, semini idee che guardino al lungo periodo e alla cultura, come nutrimento dell’ Italia e delle sue menti, ciò che ci rende pensanti, autonomi e liberi, una forma di cibo necessaria e universale. Mi auguro anche che questo sia il primo passo per realizzare una serie di mostre in materia di moda allestite – non più sporadicamente e sperabilmente non in un’ unica, seppur ampia, sala – nei musei italiani (dicendo ciò penso alla mostra che quest’ anno ha celebrato il made in Italy a Londra, presso il Victoria & Albert Museum e penso anche alle nuove tecnologie di cui dotarsi per render ancor più esaustivo e fruibile il racconto di una mostra).

Mila Schön,  coat in plain-weave double wool with intarsia inspired by Lucio Fontana's cuts, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Giorgio Schön) and Roberto Capucci, "Omaggio a Burri", georgette coat with applied wool elements, inspired by the artist's works, 1969, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Mila Schön, coat in plain-weave double wool with intarsia inspired by Lucio Fontana’s cuts, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Giorgio Schön) and Roberto Capucci, “Omaggio a Burri”, georgette coat with applied wool elements, inspired by the artist’s works, 1969, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Coppola and Toppo, photo by N

Coppola and Toppo, photo by N

Germana Marucelli( 1962. 1967-1968, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( 1962. 1967-1968, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

 

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Anna Magnani, still image from the movie "Bellissima" by Luchino Visconti

Anna Magnani, still image from the movie “Bellissima” by Luchino Visconti, 1951, courtesy National Film Library – Film Experimental Centre

Fashion dialogues with art, telling about the fashion in the atelier and the Italian fashion history, the haute couture from its rise to the late Sixties. That is the core of “Bellissima. The Italy of high fashion 1945-1968”, exhibition curated by Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi and Anna Mattirolo, organized in collaboration with Altaroma and in main partnership with Bulgari which will be opened on 30th November 2014  at 7:30 pm and will be held from 2nd December 2014 to 3rd May 2015 in Rome at the MAXXI Museum. The exhibition talks about high fashion, Italy and its creative synergies, by using photography and art, giving rise to an open dialogue between different disciplines.

A model at the Rome Capitol Museums, behind the Constantine monument,  wearing a dress by Fontana Sisters (1952), photo by Regina Relang (courtesy of Münchner Stadtmuseum, Sammlung Fotografie, Archiv Relang)

A model at the Rome Capitol Museums, behind the Constantine monument, wearing a dress by Fontana Sisters, 1952, photo Regina Relang (courtesy of Münchner Stadtmuseum, Sammlung Fotografie, Archiv Relang)

Fendi Fall/Winter 1967-1968

Fendi Fall/Winter 1967-1968

Original sketch by Karl Lagerfeld, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, photo   © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

Original sketch by Karl Lagerfeld, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, photo © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

The photography by Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla, Ugo Mulas catchs the most important moments of this tale and the artworks by Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri, Paolo Scheggi, Massimo Campigli, Getulio Alviani, Carla Accardi and Giuseppe Capogrossi – coming from the National Gallery of Modern Art – evidence the vital creativity which marked Italy and an age. The creations by couturiers as Germana Marucelli emphasizes the connection existing between art and fashion. It’s a detailed display of fashion, featuring the garnments by Maria Antonelli, Renato Balestra, Biki, Carosa, Roberto Capucci, Gigliola Curiel, Fendi, FontanaSorelle Sisters(as the “Pretino” dress they created in 1955 for Ava Gardner), Irene Galitzine, Fernanda Gattinoni, Mingolini-Guggenheim, Fausto Sarli, Mila Schön, Emilio Schuberth, Simonetta and Fabiani, Valentino, Jole Veneziani along with the accessories by Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Gucci, Roberta di Camerino, jewelry by Bulgari – including the iconic creations “Snakes”- and fashion jewelry by Coppola and Toppo.

Model of Sorelle Botti, photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1947

Dress by Botti Sisters, photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1947

Two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking  in steps of Central State Archive, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1958

Two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking in steps of Central State Archive, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1958

Ugo Mulas, Lungo i Navigli, 1958 photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas,  courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

Ugo Mulas, Lungo i Navigli, 1958,
photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas, courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

The tale of exhibition is embodied in a marvelous catalogue (Electa, € 55.00) opening with a photograph by Garolla, combined with the words by Maria Luisa Frisa revealing what is the core of exhibition, the portrait of couturier and its role, being not just only “a creator, but an individual who observes the society where he lives, questions its many moods, …kneaded by the energy of his time” or bringer and interpret of “Volksgeist”, “The Spirit of people”, in a certain place and time.

Ivy Nicholson wearing a dress by Gattinoni at the Imperial Fora, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1954

Ivy Nicholson wearing a dress by Gattinoni at the Imperial Fora, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1954

 Giovannelli-Sciarra, photo Fortunato Scrimali published in the magazine Bellezza, n. 9, September 1953

Giovannelli-Sciarra, photo Fortunato Scrimali
ft. in the magazine “Bellezza”, n. 9, September 1953

 Ava Gardner wearing the  “Pretino"  dress, (created for her by the Sorelle Fontana  for a film the actress had to play but the film was never made. The  cassock apparel's idea was later taken over by director Federico Fellini for Anita Ekberg in "La Dolce Vita", 1960), 1955, photo Pierluigi Praturlon, courtesy of Historical Archive  Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Ava Gardner wearing the “Pretino” dress, (created for her by the Fontana Sisters for a film the actress had to play but the film was never made. The cassock apparel’s idea was later taken over by Federico Fellini for Anita Ekberg in  the movie “La Dolce Vita”, 1960), 1955, photo Pierluigi Praturlon,
courtesy Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Anita Ekberge ft. in "La dolce vita" by Federico Fellini, 1960, photo Pierluigi Praturlon, courtesy Archivio Fotografico della Cineteca Nazionale - Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia. Fondo Reporters Associati

Anita Ekberg ft. in “La dolce vita” by Federico Fellini, 1960, photo Pierluigi Praturlon, courtesy  Photo Archive of National Film Library – Experimental Film Centre. Fondo Reporters Associati

Bulgari, snake bracelet watch gold, red and green enamel and diamonds, ca1965

Bulgari, snake bracelet watch gold, red and green enamel and diamonds, 1965

Salvatore Ferragamo, Damigella ankle boots (created for Sofia Loren), 1957, photo Christofer Broadbent

Salvatore Ferragamo, Damigella ankle boots (created for Sofia Loren), 1957, photo Christofer Broadbent

Bulgari, Tubogas gold bracelet-watch, ca 1965

Bulgari, Tubogas gold bracelet-watch, 1965

The binomial between art and fashion will be also enriched by VB74, the performance created by Vanessa Beecroft exclusively for the exhibition which will be held during its opening. That makes “Bellissima” a not to be missed event and precious, as it dignifies fashion as source of culture and art, bringing again it in the place where it has to be: the museum. I tell that, thinking that can be a first step towards the path giving rise to a Fashion Museum in Italy or – considering also what it happens in other museums as the New York MET Museum the London Victoria & Albert Museum – of specific areas focused on fashion being into a museum.

LA MODA NELL’ ATELIER: LA MOSTRA “BELLISSIMA. L’ ITALIA DELL’ ALTA MODA 1945-1968” AL MUSEO MAXXI DI ROMA

Still image from the movie "The Barefoot Countess" by  Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1954, photo Osvaldo Civirani, courtesy Archivio Fotografico della Cineteca Nazionale - Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia. Fondo Civirani

Still image from the movie “The Barefoot Countess” by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1954,
photo Osvaldo Civirani, courtesy Photo Archive from the National Film Library – Film Experimental Centre. Fondo Civirani

La moda dialoga con l’ arte, raccontando la moda nell’ atelier, la storia della moda italiana e l’ alta moda dalla sua nascita alla fine degli anni Sessanta. Questo è il cuore di “Bellissima. L’ Italia dell’ alta moda 1945-1968”, mostra curata da Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi ed Anna Mattirolo, organizzata in collaborazione con Altaroma e in main partnership con Bulgari che sarà inaugurata il 30 novembre 2014 alle ore 19.30 e si terrà dal 2 dicembre 2014 al 3 maggio 2015 al Museo MAXXI di Roma. Il percorso espositivo della mostra parla dell’ alta moda, dell’ Italia e delle sue sinergie creative avvalendosi della fotografia e dell’ arte, dando vita un dialogo aperto tra diverse discipline.

Creations by De Gasperi Zezza, Fernanda Gattinoni and Sorelle Fontana - Fontana Sisters -, photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1948,  published in the magazine I Tessili Nuovi. Estate, n. 37, July – August - September 1948

Creations by De Gasperi Zezza, Fernanda Gattinoni and Fontana Sisters,
photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1948,
ft. in the magazine I Tessili Nuovi. Summer, n. 37, July – August – September 1948

Fendi, vison, mink coat, 1960. photo © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

Fendi, mink coat, 1960. photo © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

Fendi, mink coat, 1960

Fendi, mink coat, 1960

La fotografia di Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla, Ugo Mulas cattura i momenti più salienti di questo intenso racconto e le opere di Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri, Paolo Scheggi, Massimo Campigli, Getulio Alviani, Carla Accardi e Giuseppe Capogrossi – provenienti dalla Galleria Nazionale di Arte Moderna – testimoniano la vitale creatività che ha segnato un’ epoca e l’ Italia. Le creazioni di couturiers quali Germana Marucelli enfatizzano il legame tra arte e moda. Una dettagliata rassegna di moda di cui sono protagonisti i capi di Maria Antonelli, Renato Balestra, Biki, Carosa, Roberto Capucci, Gigliola Curiel, Fendi, Sorelle Fontana (come l’ abito “Pretino” da loro creato nel 1955 per Ava Gardner), Irene Galitzine, Fernanda Gattinoni, Mingolini-Guggenheim, Fausto Sarli, Mila Schön, Emilio Schuberth, Simonetta e Fabiani, Valentino, Jole Veneziani unitamente agli accessori di Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Gucci, Roberta di Camerino, i gioielli di Bulgari – comprensivi delle iconiche creazioni “Serpenti” – e la bigiotteria di Coppola e Toppo.

Two creations by De Gasperi Zezza at Museum of the  Baths of Diocletian, photo Pasquale De Antonis, Rome, 1948

Two creations by De Gasperi Zezza at Museum of the Baths of Diocletian, photo Pasquale De Antonis, Rome, 1948

Gina Lollobrigida,  still image from the movie "Come September" (1961) by Robert Mulligan, ©Universal Pictures

Gina Lollobrigida, wearing jewelry by Bulgari, still image from the movie “Come September” by Robert Mulligan, 1962
©Universal Pictures

Anita Ekberg, wearing Bulgari jewelry, still image from the movie "Call me Bwana" by Douglas Gordon, 1962

Anita Ekberg, wearing Bulgari jewelry, still image from the movie “Call me Bwana” by Douglas Gordon, 1962

Il racconto della mostra è racchiuso anche in uno splendido catalogo (Edizioni Electa, € 55.00) che si apre con una foto di Garolla, accompagnato dalle parole di Maria Luisa Frisa che svelano ciò che è il nucleo fondante della mostra, il ritratto del couturier e del suo ruolo, il quale non è soltanto “ un creatore, ma un individuo che scruta la società in cui vive, ne interroga i molteplici umori,..impastato dall’ energia del proprio tempo” ovvero portatore e interprete del “Volksgeist”, lo “Spirito del popolo, in un determinato luogo e tempo.

Creations by Fercioni, photo Elsa Robiola,  ft. in the magazine Bellezza, n. 5, May 1951

Creations by Fercioni, photo Elsa Robiola,
ft. in the magazine Bellezza, n. 5, May 1951

 'Azalea Rosa',  Roberto Capucci, first show: Sala Bianca Palazzo Pitti in Florence, 1961, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive Roberto Capucci Foundation

“Azalea rosa”dress, Roberto Capucci, first show,  Florence Palazzo Pitti White, 1961, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation

1969 'Omaggio a Burri' "Homage to Burri", Roberto Capucci, first show at the Rome Capucci atelier in Via Gregoriana, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive Roberto Capucci Foundation

“Homage to Burri”, Roberto Capucci, first show at the Rome Capucci atelier in Via Gregoriana, 1969, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation

Roberto Capucci, first show, Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive of  Roberto Capucci Foundation

Roberto Capucci, first show, Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, photo Claudia Primangeli,  1959, Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation

Salvatore Ferragamo, "Decolletè",shoes created for Maliryn Monroe in the movie “Bus Stop” by Joshua Logan, 1965, photo Roberto Quagli

Salvatore Ferragamo, “Decolletè”,shoes created for Maliryn Monroe in the movie “Bus Stop” by Joshua Logan, 1965, photo Roberto Quagli

Bulgari, necklace, earrings, gold and platinum with turquoises, sapphires, diamonds, 1961-1962

Bulgari, necklace, earrings, gold and platinum with turquoises, sapphires, diamonds, 1961-1962

Venice, 1966, photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas,  courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

Venice, 1966, photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas, courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

Il binomio tra arte e moda sarà anche arricchito da VB74, la performance creata esclusivamente per la mostra dall’ artista Vanessa Beecroft che si terrà durante la opening. Ciò rende “Bellissima” un evento imperdibile e prezioso, poiché dignifica la moda quale fonte di cultura e di arte, riportandola nel luogo in cui deve stare: il museo. Dico ciò, pensando che questo possa essere un primo passo per il cammino che dia luogo alla nascita di un Museo della Moda in Italia oppure – considerando anche ciò che accade in altre istituzioni museali quali il MET Museum di New York ed il Victoria & Albert Museum di Londra – di specifiche aree dedicate alla moda all’ interno di un museo.

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Cinzia Malvini, Furio Francini, Frida Giannini, photo by N

Cinzia Malvini, Furio Francini, Frida Giannini, photo by N

A celebration, the 50th birthday of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy, which coincided with the opening of its new academic year and with the launch of book “Accademia Costume & Moda 1964-2014” by Maria di Napoli Rampolla and Antonio Mancinelli, was recently held in Rome at the Rome Costume & Fashion Academy. The afternoon event was under the sign of fashion. There were many celebrated personas from the fashion realm as Beppe Modenese, Anna Fendi, Piero Tosi, Adriano Franchi, Fabiana Balestra, Fabio Quaranta, Deanna Ferretti Veroni, Laura Lusuardi, Donata Sartorio, Alessandra Spalletti, Maria Luisa Frisa, the ex-alumni of Academy Tommaso Aquilano, Maurizio Galante and Sylvio Giardina. Here it was hosted a talk moderated by Cinzia Malvini which featured the creative director of Gucci fashion house Frida Giannini, who was a student of Academy. The fashion designer talked about creativity as “result of a team work”. Concerning young creatives she is focused on “observing the hand, the way they draw, as the instinct and vision of free hand makes the difference”. She talked about her experience made working at Fendi fashion house “where she learnt to be in place as today it’s important how to approach”, considering there is a Wikipedia culture today in many realms”. A video, introduced by Cinzia Malvini told about the Women association she launched and an live music event featuring Beyonce, Rita Ora, Jessie J, Florence & the Machine and many others. The association made concrete over 390 projects supporting the women. The talk with Frida Giannini ended with her suggestion for the student: let’s study, work hard and have fun”. Later, another ex-alumnus, the fashion journalist Antonio Mancinelli talked about his experience. He wanted to work as fashion designer and during the study at the Academy he changed his path and came to the journalism. He considered the wearability as value and result of a suggestion given him in the form of a question by Rosana Pistolese, the founder of Academy, arising from the view of a creation he made: “is it wearable?”, she asked him. Antonio said yes, it was, but naturally it was not. And since this experience, that became a paradigm to look at fashion, “something which always features in the Gucci collections Frida made, the wearability, their being wearable and super glamourous”. He considered “Rosana Pistolese as a kind of human Facebook, as she catalysed a series of important personas”. Later it was told about the book celebrating the fifty years of Academy, a book made with the support and collaboration with Altaroma and Alcantara along with the initiatives of Academy as the creations of the ex-alumni Association in order to give them working opportunities. A successful event depicting the laudable work of a bright Institution.

UNA CELEBRAZIONE & L’ INAUGURAZIONE DELL’ ANNO ACCADEMICO DELL’ ACCADEMIA DI COSTUME & MODA DI ROMA

Cinzia Malvini, Antonio Mancinelli and Beppe Modenese, photo by N

Cinzia Malvini, Antonio Mancinelli and Beppe Modenese, photo by N

Una celebrazione, il 50° compleanno dell’ Accademia di Costume & Moda di Roma, in concomitanza con l’ apertura del suo nuovo anno accademico e la presentazione del libro “Accademia Costume & Moda 1964-2014” a cura di Maria di Napoli Rampolla e Antonio Mancinelli, si è recentemente tenuta a Roma presso l’ Accademia di Costume e Moda di Roma. L’ evento pomeridiano è stato all’ insegna della moda. Presenti molteplici celebri personaggi della moda quali Beppe Modenese, Anna Fendi, Piero Tosi, Adriano Franchi, Fabiana Balestra, Fabio Quaranta, Deanna Ferretti Veroni, Laura Lusuardi, Donata Sartorio, Alessandra SpallettiMaria Luisa Frisa, gli ex-allievi dell’ Accademia Tommaso Aquilano, Maurizio Galante e Sylvio Giardina. Ivi è stato ospitato un talk moderato dalla giornalista Cinzia Malvini di cui è stato protagonista il direttore creativo della casa di moda Gucci Frida Giannini, che è stata una studentessa dell’ Accademia. La fashion designer ha parlato di creatività come “risultato di un lavoro di gruppo”. Riguardo ai giovani creativi si è concentrata sull’ “osservare la mano, il modo in cui disegnano, perché l’ istinto e la visione della mano libera fà la differenza”. Ha raccontato la sua esperienza di lavoro presso la casa di moda Fendi “dove ha imparato a stare al proprio posto, poiché oggi è importante come comportarsi”, considerando che “oggi c‘ è una cultura da Wikipedia un po’ su tutti i fronti”. Un video, presentato da Cinzia Malvini parlava dell’ Associazione per le Donne da lei lanciata e di un evento musicale con  Beyonce, Rita Ora, Jessie J, Florence & the Machine e molti altri. L’ associazione ha concretizzato più di 390 progetti a sostegno delle donne. Il talk con Frida Giannini si è concluso con un simpatico monito da lei dato  agli studenti: “studiate, impegnatevi e divertitevi”. Successivamente, un altro ex-allievo, il giornalista di moda Antonio Mancinelli ha parlato della sua esperienza all’ Accademia. Voleva lavorare come fashion designer e durante gli studi all’ Accademia ha cambiato il suo percorso ed è approdato al giornalismo. Costui ha preso in considerazione la portabilità come valore e risultato di un suggerimento a lui dato in forma di domanda da Rosana Pistolese, la fondatrice dell’ Accademia, derivante dalla visione di una sua creazione: “lo indosseresti?”, chiese a lui. Antonio rispose di si, ma naturalmente il capo non era indossabile. E a partire da questa esperienza, ciò è divenuto un suo paradigma per guardare la moda e qualcosa che appare sempre nelle collezioni Gucci realizzate da Frida: la indossabilità, l’ esser portabili e super glamourous. Riteneva “Rosana Pistolese una sorta di Facebook umano, perché catalizzava una serie di personaggi importanti”. A seguire si è parlato del libro che celebra i cinquanta anni dell’ Accademia, un libro realizzato con il sostegno e la collaborazione di Altaroma ed Alcantara unitamente alle iniziative dell’ Accademia quali la creazione di un’ Associazione di ex-alunni al fine di offrire opportunità lavorative. Un felice evento che ritrae il lodevole lavoro di una brillante istituzione.

Beppe Modenese, Fiamma Lanzara, Maria Luisa Frisa, photo by N

Beppe Modenese, Fiamma Lanzara, Maria Luisa Frisa, photo by N

Piero Tosi and Anna Fendi, photo by N

Piero Tosi and Anna Fendi, photo by N

Two Adrien: Adriano Franchi and Adrien Roberts, photo by N

Two Adrien: Adriano Franchi and Adrien Roberts, photo by N

Fabiana Balestra and Lupo Lanzara, photo by N

Fabiana Balestra and Lupo Lanzara, photo by N

Details talking about the Academy and its founder, Rosana Pistolese, photo by N

Details talking about the Academy and its founder, Rosana Pistolese, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Alessandra Spalletti, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Alessandra Spalletti, photo by N

www.accademiacostumeemoda.it

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Modernism, avant-garde, refinement and experimentation, symmetry and lightness, an elegance talking about the art of made in Italy and culture, this is the core of Spring/Summer 2015 collection by Fendi, paying homage to the architecture, the Rome Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana ( Rationalist building – hosting the brand Headquarters – which has drawn inspiration by the metaphysical painting by De Chirico) and its arches. Colors are light, natural and basic(black and white).  A wise game of cuts and transparencies enhances the silhouette along with marvelous prints and unusual reinterpretations in sophisticated way of cloths as denim. It features the orchid-motif  being embroidered in the invitation of fashion show and is impressed on shirts, trousers, dresses and accessories, bags ( as the legendary Baguette bag, enriched by many decorations and Peekaboo bag) and shoes, sandals, genuine masterpieces.

L’ ARTE DEL MADE IN ITALY & LA CULTURA: IL MODERNISMO, L’ AVANGUARDIA & LA RAFFINATEZZA DI FENDI

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Modernismo, avanguardia, raffinatezza e sperimentazione, simmetria e leggerezza, un’ eleganza che parla dell’ arte del made in Italy e di cultura, questo, il cuore della collezione primavera/estate 2015 di Fendi che rende omaggio all’ architettura, al Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana di Roma (costruzione razionalista – e sede centrale del marchio – che ha tratto ispirazione dalla pittura metafisica di De Chirico) e alle sue arcate. I colori sono tenui, naturali e basici (bianco e nero). Un sapiente gioco di tagli e trasparenze esalta la silhouette unitamente a splendide stampe e insolite reinterpretazioni in chiave sofisticata di tessuti quali il denim. Protagonista, il motivo a orchidea che è ricamato nell’ invito alla sfilata ed è impresso su camicie, pantaloni, abiti e accessori, borse( quali la leggendaria Baguette, arricchita da plurime decorazioni e la Peekaboo) e le scarpe, i sandali, autentici capolavori.

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

Fendi Spring/Summer 2015, photo by N

 

Silvia Venturini Fendi and Karl Lagerfeld, photo by N

Silvia Venturini Fendi and Karl Lagerfeld, photo by N

 

The backstage of Fendi fashion show, photo by N

The backstage of Fendi fashion show, photo by N

 

Silvia Venturini Fendi and Bianca Brandolini D' Adda, photo by N

Silvia Venturini Fendi and Bianca Brandolini D’ Adda, photo by N

 

Carla Fendi, photo by N

Carla Fendi, photo by N

 

Delfina Delettrez, photo by N

Delfina Delettrez, photo by N

 

Mother and daughter: Silvia Venturini Fendi and Leonetta Luciano Fendi, photo by N

Mother and daughter: Silvia Venturini Fendi and Leonetta Luciano Fendi, photo by N

 

Nina Pons Fendi and me, myself and I, photo by N

Nina Pons Fendi and me, myself and I, photo by N

 

 

www.fendi.com

A rose at Floracult, photo by N

A rose at Floracult, photo by N

The culture of nature along with suggestions concerning fashion and interior design featured in Floracult, event created by Ilaria Venturini Fendi and curated by Antonella Fornai which was recently held in the Rome countryside, in La Storta at I Casali del Pino as the talk featuring the photographer and journalist Luca Bracali who talked about the book he made “A rose is a rose”. The book documents on photos the experience of a celebrated family owning a nursery since four generations, the Barni family which created renowned roses as the ones dedicated to iconic personas like Mariangela Melato, Anna Venturini Fendi and many others.

Luca Bracali along with a photo he took, photo by N

Luca Bracali along with a photo he took, photo by N

 

 

Luca Bracali , photo by N

Luca Bracali , photo by N

 

Anna Venturini Fendi at the talk, showing me a necklace designer many years ago by Karl Lagerfeld for Fendi, photo by N

Anna Venturini Fendi at the talk, showing me a necklace designed many years ago by Karl Lagerfeld for Fendi, photo by N

That was not the only chance to know more about flowers and plants. In fact the expert Vanda Del Valli talked about the uses of herbs since long times ago, as the Euphorbia, used as remedy against sifilis, the betel berries and the leaves of coca as stimulants and the peyote from which it arises the mescaline, powerful hallucinogenic, evoking the psychedelic culture from Sixties and Seventies, Jim Morrison, his dangerous habits, “The doors of perceptions” and “Heaven and hell” by Aldous Huxley.

Vanda Del Valli, photo by N

Vanda Del Valli, photo by N

 

The Euphorbia

The Euphorbia

 

Peyote

Peyote

Culture as well as fashion suggestions, the creations by Dora Giannetti aka Elisabeth the first, made by joining antique, research cloths to contemporary shapes as well as other unique pieces she made that are under the sign of a timeless elegance. The nice Marina of Verdiana & Beniamina, brand bringing the name of her two daughters, presented a series of dresses and shirts embodying high-end materials, a fine lace and other fun patterns. The brand having its atelier in Milan, in Via Marco Polo 13 also makes works of customization, renewing and reinterpreting the clothes everyone has in its own wardrobe. A smashing series of accessories completed the fashion showcase. I saw again the jewelry designer Simona Rinciari of whose work combines natural elements as berries, the cinnamon sticks, the fava beans and dry leaves to metal and gems, giving rise to unusual creations that make concrete a bright craftsmanship. Jewelry and hats, head accessories hand-made by Patrizia Romiti.

Elisabeth the first, photo by N

Elisabeth the first, photo by N

 

Elisabeth the first, photo by N

Elisabeth the first, photo by N

 

Elisabeth the first, photo by N

Elisabeth the first, photo by N

 

Elisabeth the first, photo by N

Elisabeth the first, photo by N

Marina of Verdiana & Beniamina, photo by N

Marina of Verdiana & Beniamina, photo by N

 

Verdiana & Beniamina, photo by N

Verdiana & Beniamina, photo by N

 

Verdiana & Beniamina, photo by N

Verdiana & Beniamina, photo by N

 

Simona Rinciari, photo by N

Simona Rinciari, photo by N

 

Simona Rinciari, photo by N

Simona Rinciari, photo by N

 

Simona Rinciari, photo by N

Simona Rinciari, photo by N

 

Simona Rinciari, photo by N

Simona Rinciari, photo by N

 

Simona Rinciari, photo by N

Simona Rinciari, photo by N

 

Me wearing a hat by Patrizia Romiti

Me wearing a hat by Patrizia Romiti

 

Patrizia Romiti, photo by N

Patrizia Romiti, photo by N

 

Patrizia Romiti, photo by N

Patrizia Romiti, photo by N

The Friulane slippers by Allagiulia, brand created by Giulia Campeol, were showcased in the area of Dedé maison, the renowned Rome boutique, placed in Via dei Pianellari 21 of smashing Theodora Bugel, focused on the creation and sale of furniture and homewear, which exhibited a catchy selection of objects. It shined the alchemic lightness and charme of scents by Meo Fusciuni aka The cousin of Fabio Quaranta – special individual I was very pleased of meeting and with whom I shared moments of life and Epicurean interludes – who showcased at the School of re-inventors, curated by Clara Tosi Pamphili and Alessio De Navasques, the scents he made as “Notturno” and “Luce” and turned into herbalist who made some magic potions to take care of oneself. An overwhelming experience which has colored of magic, warmth, color, fun and relax.

FLORACULT: TRE GIORNI ALL’ INSEGNA DI ARTE, PROFUMI, DELLA NATURA E DELLA SUA CULTURA(2)

 

A rose by Barni, photo by N

A rose by Barni, photo by N

La cultura della natura unitamente alle suggestioni inerenti la moda e l’ interior design sono stati I protagonisti a Floracult, evento creato da Ilaria Venturini Fendi e curato da Antonella Fornai che si è recentemente tenuto nella campagna romana, a La Storta presso I Casali del Pino come il talk con il fotografo e giornalista Luca Bracali che ha parlato del suo libro “A rose is a rose”. Il libro documenta su foto l’ esperienza di una celebre famiglia di vivaisti da quattro generazioni, la famiglia Barni che ha creato rinomate rose come quelle dedicate a iconici personaggi quali Mariangela Melato, Anna Venturini Fendi e molti altri.

A rose by Barni, photo by N

A rose by Barni, photo by N

 

Ilaria Venturini Fendi along with a man who was born and lived in the area of I Casali Del Pino, photo by N

Ilaria Venturini Fendi along with a man who was born and lived in the area of I Casali Del Pino, photo by N

Questa non è stata l’ unica occasione di conoscere meglio fiori e piante. L’ esperta Vanda Del Valli ha infatti parlato degli usi di erbe sin dai tempi più remoti, come l’ Euphorbia, usata come rimedio contro la sifilide, le bacche di betel e le foglie di coca come stimolanti e il peyote da cui deriva la mescaline, potente allucinogeno che evoca la cultura psichedelica degli anni Sessanta e Settanta, Jim Morrison, le sue rischiose abitudini, “Le porte della percezione” e “Paradiso e inferno” di Aldous Huxley.

Cultura come anche suggestioni moda, le creazioni di Dora Giannetti aka Elisabeth the first, da lei realizzate unendo tessuti antichi e di ricerca a forme contemporanee insieme ad altri suoi pezzi unici che sono all’ insegna di un’ eleganza senza tempo. La simpatica Marina di Verdiana & Beniamina, brand che prende il nome dalle sue due figlie, ha presentato una serie di abiti e camicie che racchiudono in sé, materiali di alta qualità, un raffinato pizzo e divertenti motivi. Il marchio, che ha il suo atelier a Milano in Via Marco Polo 13, realizza anche lavori di customizzazione, rinnovando e reinterpretando gli abiti del guardaroba. Ho rivisto la designer di gioielli Simona Rinciari il cui raffinato lavoro combina elementi naturali come le bacche, le stecche di cannella, le fave e le foglie secche al metallo e alle pietre preziose, dando vita a insolite creazioni che concretizzano una brillante artigianalità. Gioielli e cappelli, accessori per capelli, realizzati a mano da Patrizia Romiti.

A smashing artist, Sergio Cammariere and me

A smashing artist, Sergio Cammariere and me

Roberto Ciufoli and me

Roberto Ciufoli and me

 

 

La versione delle slippers Friulane di Allagiulia, brand creato da Giulia Campeol, sono state esposte nell’ area di Dedé maison, la rinomata boutique di Roma, ubicata in Via dei Pianellari 21 della formidabile Theodora Bugel dedicata alla creazione e vendita di componenti di arredo e homewear, che ha presentato una accattivante selezione di oggetti. Ha brillato l’ alchemica leggerezza e il fascino dei profumi di Meo Fusciuni aka il cugino di Fabio Quaranta – speciale individualità che mi ha fatto molto piacere conoscere e con il quale ho condiviso momenti di vita, risate e interludi epicurei – che ha esposto alla Scuola dei reinventori, curate da Clara Tosi Pamphili e Alessio De Navasques, le sue fragranze quali “Notturno” e “Luce” e si è trasformato in erborista, realizzando alcune pozioni magiche per prendersi cura di sé. Un’ esperienza travolgente che è stata colorata da magia, calore, colore, divertimento e relax.

photo by N

photo by N

Dede  maison, photo by N

Dede maison, photo by N

 

Dede maison, photo by N

Dede maison, photo by N

 

Dede maison, photo by N

Dede maison, photo by N

 

Dede maison, photo by N

Dede maison, photo by N

 

Allagiulia, photo by N

Allagiulia, photo by N

 

Allagiulia, photo by N

Allagiulia, photo by N

Stephan Hamel and Lupo Lanzara, photo by N

Stephan Hamel and Lupo Lanzara, photo by N

 

Andrea Provvidenza and me, photo by N

Andrea Provvidenza and me, photo by N

 

Meo Fusciuni aka The cousin of Fabio Quaranta, photo by N

Meo Fusciuni aka The cousin of Fabio Quaranta, photo by N

 

The magic potion by Meo Fusciuni aka The cousin of Fabio Quaranta, photo by N

The magic potion by Meo Fusciuni aka The cousin of Fabio Quaranta, photo by N

 

Meo Fusciuni aka The cousin of Fabio Quaranta, photo by N

Meo Fusciuni aka The cousin of Fabio Quaranta, photo by N

 

Meo Fusciuni aka the cousin of Fabio Quaranta, photo by N

Meo Fusciuni aka the cousin of Fabio Quaranta, photo by N

 

An alchemic moment featuring me and Meo Fusciuni aka the cousin of Fabio Quaranta

An alchemic moment featuring me and Meo Fusciuni aka the cousin of Fabio Quaranta

 

Floracult, photo by N

Floracult, photo by N

 

 

www.floracult.com

Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Modernism, sartorialism, core of Fendi’s sign, experimentation, an unusual combinations of materials, leather and Pvc, chiffon, bright colors – shocking rose, red, orange – and also blue, light blue, white and black, precious details – the Swarovski crystals – a successful play of cuts, overlaps and transparencies shines in the Spring/Summer 2014 collection of fashion house. The collection, made by Karl Lagerfeld, is enriched by marvelous accessories talking about luxury, craftsmanship, innovation and the heritage of fashion house, the fur, decorating bags created by Silvia Venturini Fendi and the jewels – rings, earrings and bangles – made by the brilliant Delfina Delettrez.

 

IL SOFISTICATO MODERNISMO E LA SPERIMENTAZIONE DI FENDI

Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Modernismo, sartorialità, nucleo fondante del segno di Fendi, sperimentazione, una combinazione insolita di materiali, pelle e pvc, organza, colori vivaci -, rosa shocking, rosso, arancio e anche blu, celeste, bianco e nero, preziosi dettagli – i cristalli Swarovski – un felice gioco di tagli, sovrapposizioni e trasparenze splendono nella collezione primavera/estate 2014 della maison. La collezione, realizzata da Karl Lagerfeld, è arricchita da meravigliosi accessori che parlano di lusso, artigianalità, innovazione e dell’ heritage della casa di moda, la pelliccia, che decora le borse create da Silvia Venturini Fendi e i gioielli – anelli, orecchini e bangles – realizzati dalla brillante Delfina Delettrez.

Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Delfina Delettrez for Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo courtesy of Delfina Delettrez
Delfina Delettrez for Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo courtesy of Delfina Delettrez
Delfina Delettrez for Fendi, photo courtesy of Delfina Delettrez
Delfina Delettrez for Fendi, photo courtesy of Delfina Delettrez
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Fendi Spring/Summer 2014, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Cara Delevingne and Karl Lagerfeld, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Cara Delevingne and Karl Lagerfeld, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Cara Delevingne and Georgia May Jagger, photo by Giorgio Miserendino
Cara Delevingne and Georgia May Jagger, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

www.fendi.com

Fendi baguette Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi baguette Fall/Winter 2013-2014

The baguette, iconic bag of renowned brand Fendi, created by Silvia Venturini Fendi, recently featured in a book telling its story, has celebrated by the artist Angelo Musco who created a suggestive sculpture made by using the eggshells and has also turned into a little useful fetish, a colored memory stick having a space of 2 GB, a smashing gift idea which is available at the Fendi boutiques. The baguette family recently enriched of a new version “Be Baguette”, bag and categorical imperative for all the ones who are devoted to the charm of baguette.

 

ARTE, MODA & TECNOLOGIA NEL NOME DELLA BAGUETTE

The baguette interpreted  by Angelo Musco

The baguette interpreted by Angelo Musco

La baguette, iconica borsa del rinomato brand Fendi, creata da Silvia Venturini Fendi, è stata recentemente protagonista di un libro che narra la sua storia, è stata celebrata dall’ artista Angelo Musco che ha creato una suggestiva scultura, realizzata mediante l’ uso di gusci d’uovo ed è stata anche trasformata in un utile feticcio, un colorato memory stick che ha uno spazio di 2 GB, una formidabile idea regalo che è disponibile presso le boutique Fendi. La famiglia della baguette si è recentemente arricchita di una nuova versione “Be Baguette”, borsa e imperativo categorico per tutti quelli che sono devoti al fascino della baguette.

A little fetish, the Fendi baguette turned into memory stick

A little fetish, the Fendi baguette turned into memory stick

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Fall/Winter 2011-2012

Fendi Fall/Winter 2011-2012

Fendi Fall/Winter 2011-2012

Fendi Fall/Winter 2011-2012

Fendi Fall/Winter 2010-2011

Fendi Fall/Winter 2010-2011

Fendi Fall/Winter 2008-2009

Fendi Fall/Winter 2008-2009

Fendi Fall/Winter 2004-2005

Fendi Fall/Winter 2004-2005

Fendi Fall/Winter 2003-2004

Fendi Fall/Winter 2003-2004

Fendi Fall/Winter 2001-2002

Fendi Fall/Winter 2001-2002

Fendi Fall/Winter 2000-2001

Fendi Fall/Winter 2000-2001

Fendi Fall/Winter 2000-2001

Fendi Fall/Winter 2000-2001

Fendi Spring/Summer 1999

Fendi Spring/Summer 1999

Fendi Be Baguette Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Be Baguette Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Be Baguette Fall/Winter 2013-2014

Fendi Be Baguette Fall/Winter 2013-2014

http://baguette.fendi.com

The Pre-loved on tour at the RE(f)USE boutique

The Pre-loved on tour at the RE(f)USE boutique

It featured in the latest edition of Altaroma, the Pre-loved on tour, a charity event to support Oxfam Italia, created by Marie Claire and Private Griffe which was held at the boutique RE(f)USE of Ilaria Venturini Fendi, pioneer fashion designer of ethical fashion brand Carmina Campus. Here it has showcased and sold vintage clothes and accessories made by the most renowned fashion companies as Fendi, Chanel, Marc Jacobs, Prada, Luisa Beccaria, Missoni, Moschino and many others that were donated by personas of fashion realm and socialites as Margherita Missoni, Isabella Borromeo and Silvia Venturini Fendi. The proceeds resulting from this sale will be given to Oxfam Italia to concretely support its laudable work. A smashing, successful initiative – considering the crowd of people which peopled the boutique during the opening of the event – that joined the culture of re-use, fashion and a laudable purpose.

SHOPPING, RIUSO & BENEFICIENZA AD ALTAROMA: IL PRE-LOVED ON TOUR A ROMA PRESSO LA BOUTIQUE RE(f)USE 

Ilaria Venturini Fendi who talks about her experience as ethical fashion designer with a journalist

Ilaria Venturini Fendi who talks about her experience as ethical fashion designer with a journalist

È stato protagonista dell’ ultima edizione di Altaroma, il Pre-loved on tour, un evento di beneficienza per sostenere Oxfam Italia, creato da Marie Claire e Private Griffe che si è tenuto presso la boutique RE(f)USE di Ilaria Venturini Fendi, pionieristica fashion designer del brand di moda ethical Carmina Campus. Ivi sono stati esposti e venduti abiti ed accessori vintage realizzati dalle più rinomate aziende di moda quali Fendi, Chanel, Marc Jacobs, Prada, Luisa Beccaria, Missoni, Moschino e molti altri che sono stati donati da personaggi dell’ ambito della moda e socialites quali Margherita Missoni, Isabella Borromeo e Silvia Venturini Fendi. Il ricavato derivante da questa vendita sarà devoluto a Oxfam Italia per sostenere concretamente la sua lodevole opera. Una formidabile, felice iniziativa – considerando la folla di gente che ha popolato la boutique durante l’ inaugurazione dell’ evento – che ha unito la cultura del riuso, la moda e una lodevole finalità.

The Pre-loved on tour at RE(f)USE

The Pre-loved on tour at RE(f)USE

Carmina Campus

Carmina Campus

Carmina Campus

Carmina Campus

The Pre-loved on tour at RE(f)USE

The Pre-loved on tour at RE(f)USE

Angelos Bratis at RE(F)USE

Angelos Bratis at RE(F)USE

Vintage Moschino

Vintage Moschino

Carmina Campus

Carmina Campus

The Pre-loved on tour at RE(f)USE

The Pre-loved on tour at RE(f)USE

Cesare Cunaccia

Cesare Cunaccia

Dress by Luisa Beccaria, donated by Isabella Borromeo

Dress by Luisa Beccaria, donated by Isabella Borromeo

Trench by Missoni, donated by Margherita Missoni

Trench by Missoni, donated by Margherita Missoni

Dress by Fendi, donated by Silvia Venturini Fendi

Dress by Fendi, donated by Silvia Venturini Fendi

Ilaria Venturini Fendi and me

Ilaria Venturini Fendi and me

www.altaroma.it

www.carminacampus.com

Fendi

Fendi

It will be opened on 4th June 2013 in São Paulo at the Cidade Jardin, the first boutique in Brazil of Fendi, which has designed under the concept of celebrated Rome Palazzo Fendi, an event which will be celebrated with “Bauhettemania”, event featuring five Brazilian artists who reinterpreted the baguette, iconic bag created by Silvia Venturini Fendi. Here it will be also showcased the works by Leda Catunda, Nelson Leirner, Rodolpho Parigi, Isay Weinfeld and Nina Pandolpho that will be lately sold during a charity auction for the association Verde Escola. It will be also available exclusively at the boutique a maxi scarf, made to celebrate the event. A not to missed happening joining art and fashion, a leitmotiv – along with the craftsmanship, elegance, refinement, tradition and innovation – of Fendi.

BAUHETTEMANIA: ARTE & MODA PER CELEBRARE L’ APERTURA DELLA BOUTIQUE DI FENDI A SAN PAOLO

Fendi

Fendi

Sarà inaugurato il 4 giugno 2013 a San Paolo presso the Cidade Jardin, la prima boutique in Brasile di Fendi che è stata progettata all’ insegna del concept del celebre Palazzo Fendi di Roma, evento che sarà celebrato con “Bauhettemania”, evento di cui saranno protagonisti cinque artisti brasiliani che hanno reinterpretato la baguette, iconica borsa creata da Silvia Venturini Fendi. Ivi saranno anche esposte le opere di Leda Catunda, Nelson Leirner, Rodolpho Parigi, Isay Weinfeld e Nina Pandolpho che saranno successivamente vendute in occasione di un’ asta di beneficenza a favore dell’ associazione Verde Escola. Sarà anche disponibile in esclusiva presso la boutique un maxi foulard, realizzato per l’ evento. Un evento imperdibile che unisce arte e moda, un leitmotiv – unitamente all’ artigianalità, eleganza, raffinatezza, tradizione e innovazione – di Fendi.

www.fendi.com

Fendi

Fendi

The celebrated brand Fendi made a smashing series of sunglasses in limited edition (including 200 pieces), made of transparent acetate in two versions of color, peach and grey, embodying 311 Swarovski crystals and 635 little hand set studs –  tha available at Fendi Takashimaya Shopping Centre, in Ngee Ann City boutique for $ 1.500,00 -, genuine jewels featuring in the Fendi Spring/Summer 2013 eyewear collection along with other sophisticated and catchy, two-colored sunglasses having the same marvelous shape and successfully evoking the idea of elegance and modernist suggestions of brand.

LA SOFISTICATA LIMITED EDITION DI OCCHIALI DA SOLE & ALTRE MERAVIGLIE DI FENDI

Fendi

Fendi

Il celebre brand Fendi ha realizzato una formidabile serie di occhiali da sole in edizione limitata (che include 200 pezzi), realizzata in acetato trasparente in due versioni di colore, pesca e grigio che racchiude 311 cristalli Svarowski e 635 piccole borchie inserite a mano – disponibili al Fendi Takashimaya Shopping Centre, presso la boutique di Ngee Ann City per $ 1.500,00 -, autentici gioielli protagonisti della collezione di occhiali da sole Fendi primavera/estate 2013 unitamente ad altri sofisticati e accattivanti occhiali da sole bicolore che hanno la medesima forma ed evocano l’ idea di eleganza e le suggestioni moderniste del brand.

Fendi

Fendi

Fendi

Fendi

Fendi

Fendi

www.fendi.com