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photo by N

photo by N

It’ s a modern day, a Sunday afternoon spent under the sign of fashion, high fashion and art. “To live with art”, categorical imperative of high fashion and Italy during the years 1945-1968. That is the core of “Bellissima. The Italy of high fashion 1945-1968”, exhibition opened on Sunday 30th November 2014 in Rome(where it was also held during the same day at the Auditorium della Musica the concert of legendary band of industrial music Einstuerzende Neubauten, a missed appointment) at the MAXXI Museum – running through 3rd May 2015 -, curated by Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi and Anna Mattirolo, organized in collaboration with Altaroma and Bulgari which is its main partner.

Roland Sejko, Simmetries of light Vol. III. courtesy Istituto Luce Cinecittà Srl

Roland Sejko, “Simmetries of light Vol. III”. Istituto Luce Cinecittà Srl, photo by N

Dresses by Germana Marucelli( Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Germana Marucelli archive),  and Roberto Capucci(1967, courtesy Roberto Capucci Archive) along with the artworks "Inter-ena-cubo", by Paolo Scheggi(1969, Carla and Cosimo Scheggi collection)

Dresses by Germana Marucelli( Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Germana Marucelli archive), and Roberto Capucci(1967, courtesy Roberto Capucci Archive) along with the artworks “Inter-ena-cubo”, by Paolo Scheggi(1969, Carla and Cosimo Scheggi collection), photo by N

Bulgari, the jewelry featuring in the "Snakes" collection(1965) Bulgari Heritage collection), photo by N

Bulgari, the jewelry featuring in the “Snakes” collection(1965) Bulgari Heritage collection), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( evening dress with bodice and belt in anodized aluminum, designed in collaboration with the artist Getulio Alviani, Alluminio collection, Spring/Summer 1969, private collection) and Emilio Pucci( lurex evening dress with jewelry clasp, Spring/Summer 1967, Emilio Pucci Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( evening dress with bodice and belt in anodized aluminum, designed in collaboration with the artist Getulio Alviani, Alluminio collection, Spring/Summer 1969, private collection) and Emilio Pucci( lurex evening dress with jewelry clasp, Spring/Summer 1967, Emilio Pucci Archive), photo by N

Getulio Alviani, "Forma"(1961, private collection, Pescara), photo by N

Getulio Alviani, “Forma”(1961, private collection, Pescara), photo by N

A story of art and poetry, the story of a nation, the Italy and its creativity, also impressed in the pages of a wonderful book which is much more than a catalogue of an exhibition, it’s an anthological work, full of documents, signs and visions that reorganize and rebuild an age in a syncretic way, giving rise to a red drop with the ready to wear from the following decades, the demi-couture and the contemporary creative language. And Rome, city which yesterday gave rise to these many creative alchemies, open dialogues and blends between art, film and fashion, becomes today its witness. All happens in an afternoon and finally in a museum. An important signal of a renovated sharing between art and fashion, representing a new way, a necessary dialogue between institutions and consequently a rediscovered dignity of fashion – emancipated from the prejudices, often considered only as consumer goods – which is a discipline, a source of culture having the same rank of the visual arts (a dignity recognized from a long time elsewhere or rather in many worldwide museums), hosted now by the place where it must be: the museum.

Federico Forquet( silk Evening jumpsuit with sequins owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, about 1967-1968, Courtesy Galleria del Costume di Palazzo Pitti - Donazione Tirelli), photo by N

Federico Forquet( silk evening jumpsuit with sequins owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, about 1967-1968, Courtesy Galleria del Costume di Palazzo Pitti – Donazione Tirelli) and Galitzine(Evening Pyjama, made of fringed jersey with braiding, crystals and glass beads, Fall/Winter 1960-1961, Label: Irene Galitzine Rome; label: Neiman Marcus), photo by N

Tiziani, designed by Karl Lagerfeld (evening dress made of silk crêpon, embroidered with glass beads, owned by Catherine Spaak, Fall/Winter 1967/1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti’s Galleria del Costume –Donazione Tirelli), photo by N

Tiziani, designed by Karl Lagerfeld (evening dress made of silk crêpon, embroidered with glass beads, owned by Catherine Spaak, Fall/Winter 1967/1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery –Donation by Tirelli), photo by N

Mila Schön, silk organza evening gown embroidered with medallions of pearls, rhinestones and sequins, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Fashion house Mila Schön’s Archive), photo by N

Mila Schön, (silk organza evening gown embroidered with medallions of pearls, rhinestones and sequins, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Fashion house Mila Schön’s Archive), photo by N

 Mila Schön (tulle evening dress, embroidered with beads, owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, courtesy  Palazzo Pitti  Costume Gallery- Tirelli donation), photo by N


Mila Schön (tulle evening dress, embroidered with beads, owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery- Donation by Tirelli), photo by N

Germana Marucelli(evening dress with sequins and silk embroidery from patterns by Pietro Zuffi, "Impero" collection, 1967, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive) and Jole Veneziani (organza short dress embroidered with stripes, sequins and jais, Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Veneziani Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli(evening dress with sequins and silk embroidery from patterns by Pietro Zuffi, “Impero” collection, 1967, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive) and Jole Veneziani (organza short dress embroidered with stripes, sequins and jais, Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Veneziani Archive), photo by N

It’s a present full of promises and energies, though it’s different from the past which exhibition tells about, from which it arises the modernity of signs, and emotions of the many stories impressed on the cloth. Shapes, spaces, colors and avant-garde suggestions, as well as craftsmanship tracing the DNA of Made in Italy and Italian fashion industry which is born yesterday as elitist and sartorial phenomenon. The couturier is the interpret and demiurge, decoding the suggestions coming from his time. Eternal works, iconic clothes, the ones by Germana Marucelli, Galitizine and Fontana Sisters, masterpieces of experimentation and irony as the lapin jumpsuit by Fendi, the dresses by Capucci and Emilio Schuberth show a fashion going beyond time. Architectures draw the femininity, made of matter, shape and colors becoming the references of exhibition. Black and white, cocktail and evening dresses, futuristic tensions and unusual lines. 80 are the clothes on show along with many accessories – including the celebrated creations by Roberta di Camerino, Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Dal Cò -, the jewelry by Bulgari and fashion jewelry by Coppola and Coppo telling about this vibrant age and do that by using other channels of communications: contemporary art, film and photography.

Galitzine( silk shantung Pyjama with shirt fully embroidered  with gold leaves and glass crystals, trousers with the same polka dot embroidered motif, 1962, label: Irene Galitzine, Rome, courtesy Galitzine Archive), photo by N

Galitzine( silk shantung Pyjama with shirt fully embroidered with gold leaves and glass crystals, trousers with the same polka dot embroidered motif, 1962, label: Irene Galitzine, Rome, courtesy Galitzine Archive), photo by N

Catalogues and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

Catalogues and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Fragiacomo( 1960, courtesy Fragiacomo) and Cavallera(1950, Courtesy City of Venice Museums - Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Fragiacomo( 1960, courtesy Fragiacomo) and Cavallera(1950, Courtesy City of Venice Museums – Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Valentino ( tulle short evening dress featuring drapes giving rise to roses, Spring/Summer 1959, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Valentino ( tulle short evening dress featuring drapes giving rise to roses, Spring/Summer 1959, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Alberto Burri, "Rosso plastica"(1961, private collection), photo by N

Alberto Burri, “Rosso plastica”(1961, private collection), photo by N

A wide setup of documents tells on film about the atmospheres of age, emphasized by the movies of legendary filmmakers as Luchino Visconti – “Bellissima”, the movie he made, is the title of exhibition -, Federico Fellini, film documentaries and photography by Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla and Ugo Mulas. The masterpieces by Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri highlight the thematic areas of exhibition path. The red dress by Valentino is matched to a work by Alberto Burri, the optical patterns by Alberto Biasi dialogue with the dress by Germana Marucelli and many others, creating a dynamic path made of lines, curves, successful asymmetries and divagations, made concrete by the set design of exhibition, a metallic path being at the wide room of MAXXI hosting it at the second floor, made by the bright architects  Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo and Guido Schinklert, makers of an experiential path, subverting the limits of space of a sole room and making usable and light an exhibition path which otherwise could become very hard and less intelligible.

Alberto Burri, "Ferro"(1960, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Alberto Burri, “Ferro”(1960, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Simonetta(two-pieces cocktail dress, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Simonetta(two-pieces cocktail dress, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Me,myself and I along wiith Adrien Yakimov, photo by N

Me,myself and I along wiith Adrien Yakimov, photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(cocktail dress,  owned by Lucy D' Albert, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(cocktail dress, owned by Lucy D’ Albert, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Marcello Mastroianni ft. in the movie "8 1/2" by Federico Fellini, photo by N

Marcello Mastroianni ft. in the movie “8 1/2” by Federico Fellini, photo by N

A motion featuring also in the mannequins by La Rosa, women – as it teaches the genius Diana Vreeland in her work as curator – and ideas on the move. Beauty and femininity, a complex talk, made of textures – as the fragments of cloths and embroideries by Fontana Sisters – and retraced by catalogues, magazines and a copious mail, precious documents telling about the relationships between the buyers, customers and ateliers, the rise of fashion industry, fashion show as event presenting and selling the fashion product (which happens for the first time on 22nd July 1952 in Florence at the Palazzo Pitti White Room).

Evening dresses by Roberto Capucci(“Azalea rosa”dress, Roberto Capucci, first show,  Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, 1961,Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), Valentino(evening dress in hand-painted sillk satin, Spring/Summer 1968, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.) and Emilio Schuberth(evening gown in silk satin with silk embroidery and glass beads,1951, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private collection), photo by N

Evening dresses by Roberto Capucci(“Azalea rosa”dress, Roberto Capucci, first show, Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, 1961,Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), Valentino(evening dress in hand-painted sillk satin, Spring/Summer 1968, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.) and Emilio Schuberth(evening gown in silk satin with silk embroidery and glass beads,1951, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private collection), photo by N

Video documenting "La settimana Incom( 1947), photo by N

Video documenting “La settimana Incom( 1947), photo by N

Botti Sisters(Evening dress in silk faille and rebrodè lace, 1957, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection) and Fontana Sisters(evening dress in damask silk with rose motifs and panel secured to the back, inspired by the traditional Japanese clothes, owned by Palma Bucarelli, 1957, courtesy Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Botti Sisters(evening dress in silk faille and rebrodè lace, 1957, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection) and Fontana Sisters(evening dress in damask silk with rose motifs and panel secured to the back, inspired by the traditional Japanese clothes, owned by Palma Bucarelli, 1957, courtesy Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Bulgari ( gold necklace with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967,  gold earrings with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, "Melone" gold vanity case with diamonds, 1960, Bulgari Heritage Collection), photo by N

Bulgari ( gold necklace with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, gold earrings with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, “Melone” gold vanity case with diamonds, 1960, Bulgari Heritage Collection), photo by N

Bulgari,  photo by N

Bulgari, photo by N

A happening enriched by the performance of artist Vanessa Beecroft, known for her semiotic affiliation with the fashion world, who staged exclusively for the event VB74, a tableau vivant made of women wrapped by veils, depicting and looking into femininity, the being and its clothing. A cooled, stripped idea which becomes abstract and embodies that catchy aesthetics which made famous the artist. An art which represents itself and answers to the questions of being through the silence of body and matter, the veil, lights and shadows. A “staged” idea revealing the essence by itself.

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Vanessa Beecroft talking with the professor Monica Bolzoni, photo by N

Vanessa Beecroft talking with the professor Monica Bolzoni, photo by N

Essence of the non-existent, that being non-existent which represents the individual seen by Carmelo Bene, though it’s not obscene, out of the stage, but it is and stays in the stage for three hours, the duration of performance which was also held on 28th November at the MAXXI for the gala dinner of exhibition for the MAXXI’s fund-raising, event where generously fashion supported art, calling its most famous features along with a plethora of more and less famous personas, known in the socialite news sections who, happy and cash, contributed to the success of evening – widely told by the website Dagospia of brilliant and ironic journalist Roberto D’ Agostino -, a fund-raising amounting to about 600.000 Euros (for an institution which – as many others Italian museums is not very well -, suffering since months, circumstances which is often told by news, resulting from the moment of precariousness and uncertainty the culture in Italy, its country and people experience).

Fontana Sisters( embroideries on cloth, 1949, 1964, 1953, Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Fontana Sisters( embroideries on cloth, 1949, 1964, 1953, Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Fernanda Gattinoni( short evening dress in moiré silk with velved and satin, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, evening cape in velvet with satin lining, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, two pieces evening dress, trousers in marocain crêpe silk  and blouse in silk organza, work by Anna Magnani, 1956, Historical Archive Fernanda and Raniero Gattinoni), photo by N

Fernanda Gattinoni( short evening dress in moiré silk with velved and satin, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, evening cape in velvet with satin lining, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, two pieces evening dress, trousers in marocain crêpe silk and blouse in silk organza, work by Anna Magnani, 1956, Historical Archive Fernanda and Raniero Gattinoni), photo by N

Ava Gardner wearing the “Pretino” dress, (created for her by the Fontana Sisters, "Pretino" dress, 1955, courtesy Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Ava Gardner wearing the “Pretino” dress, (created for her by the Fontana Sisters, “Pretino” dress, 1955,
courtesy Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Salvatore Ferragamo( décolleté shoe made in glided kid, made for Marylin Monroe for the movie by Joshua Logan "Bus stop", 1967,  décolleté shoe in satin with rhinestones appliques and stiletto heel,owned by Marylin Monroe, 1958-1959, décolleté show made of crocodile leather created for Marilyn Monroe, 1958-1959, "Damigella" ankle boot in stretch brocade-effect silk fabric, created for Sophia Loren, 1957, "Madonna", closed-toe sandal with vamp bearing flowers embroidered in silk, glass beads and rhinestones, created for Sophia Loren, 1955, "Ranina" sandal with upper in Tavernelle lace and sequin appliqués, lining in transparent vinilite, flared  Louis XV heel, made for Anna Magnani, 1955, Courtesy Salvatore Ferragamo Museum), photo by N

Salvatore Ferragamo( décolleté shoe made in glided kid, made for Marylin Monroe for the movie by Joshua Logan “Bus stop”, 1967, décolleté shoe in satin with rhinestones appliques and stiletto heel,owned by Marylin Monroe, 1958-1959, décolleté show made of crocodile leather created for Marilyn Monroe, 1958-1959, “Damigella” ankle boot in stretch brocade-effect silk fabric, created for Sophia Loren, 1957, “Madonna”, closed-toe sandal with vamp bearing flowers embroidered in silk, glass beads and rhinestones, created for Sophia Loren, 1955, “Ranina” sandal with upper in Tavernelle lace and sequin appliqués, lining in transparent vinilite, flared Louis XV heel, made for Anna Magnani, 1955, Courtesy Salvatore Ferragamo Museum), photo by N

Mingolini Guggenheim, short evening dress in organza, owned by Silvana Pampanini, late 1960, Courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery - Tirelli Donation) and Fausto Sarli ( short evening dress in fabric embroidered with pearls, Swarovski crystals and glass baguettes designed for Mina ft. in the "Studio Uno" TV program, mid-1960, courtesy Atelier Sarli Couture), photo by N

Mingolini Guggenheim, short evening dress in organza, owned by Silvana Pampanini, late 1960, Courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery – Tirelli Donation) and Fausto Sarli ( short evening dress in fabric embroidered with pearls, Swarovski crystals and glass baguettes designed for Mina ft. in the “Studio Uno” TV program, mid-1960, courtesy Atelier Sarli Couture), photo by N

That is also a positive sign, I hope it’s the beginning of a new dialogue being more productive, deep and solid between the museums and the fashion world to develop in a long term period and build new ways, sow ideas looking at the culture as food for Italy and its minds, what makes us thinking, autonomous and free, a kind of food being necessary and universal. I also wish that is the first step for making a series of exhibitions on fashion that are – not set up sporadically and hopefully not set up in a sole, though it’s wide, room – set up in the Italian museums (telling that I think about the exhibition which during this year celebrated the Made in Italy in London, at the Victoria & Albert Museum and I also think about the new technologies to use to make more complete and understandably the tale of an exhibition).

UNA GIORNATA MODERNA: L’ INAUGURAZIONE DI “BELLISSIMA. L’ ITALIA DELL’ ALTA MODA 1945-1968” AL MUSEO MAXXI DI ROMA

Federico Garolla(two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking in steps of Central State Archive, Rome, 1958), photo by N

Federico Garolla(two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking in steps of Central State Archive, Rome, 1958), photo by N

Una giornata moderna, una domenica pomeriggio passata all’ insegna della moda, dell’ alta moda e dell’ arte. “Vivere con arte”, imperativo categorico dell’ alta moda e l’ Italia durante gli anni 1945-1968. Questo il cuore di “Bellissima”, mostra inaugurata domenica 30 novembre 2014 a Roma (in cui si è anche tenuto nello stesso giorno all’ Auditorium della Musica il concerto della leggendaria band di musica industrial Einstuerzende Neubauten, un appuntamento mancato) presso il MAXXI – che prosegue fino al 3 maggio 2015 -, curata da Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi e Anna Mattirolo, organizzata in collaborazione con Altaroma e Bulgari che ne è il main partner.

Emilio Schuberth(tulle dress, decorated with beads and sequins in floral motifs, worn by Gina Lollobrigida, about 1953, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection), photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(tulle dress, decorated with beads and sequins in floral motifs, worn by Gina Lollobrigida, about 1953, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection), photo by N

Fendi (Jumpsuit in black rabbit, with diagonally symmetric pattern, adorned with jewel buttons, chiffon and lace on the collar and wrists, Fall/Winter 1067-1968, Fendi Historical Archive) and Valentino (ensemble in cotton mikado, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Fendi (Jumpsuit in black rabbit, with diagonally symmetric pattern, adorned with jewel buttons, chiffon and lace on the collar and wrists, Fall/Winter 1067-1968, Fendi Historical Archive) and Valentino (ensemble in cotton mikado, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Fendi (mink coat, 1960, Fendi historical archive), photo by N

Fendi (mink coat, 1960, Fendi historical archive), photo by N

"Bellissima", fashion and the art by Lucio Fontana( "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli)" 1968, private collection, Rome), photo by N

“Bellissima”, fashion and the art by Paolo Scheggi (“Zone riflessse”, 1963,  National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Paolo Scheggi “Zone riflesse”( 1963, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome),

Una storia d’ arte e di poesia, la storia di una nazione, l’ Italia e della sua creatività, impressa anche nelle pagine di un libro che è più di un catalogo di una mostra,opera antologica da avere, colma di documentazioni, segni, visioni che riordinano e costruiscono un’ epoca in chiave sincretica, dando vita a un “fil rouge” con il prêt à porter dei decenni successivi, il demi-couture e il linguaggio creativo contemporaneo. E Roma, città che ha dato vita ieri a queste plurime alchimie creative, dialoghi aperti e contaminazioni tra arte, cinema e moda, ne diventa oggi la testimone. Accade tutto in un pomeriggio e finalmente in un museo. Un segnale importante di una rinnovata condivisione tra arte e moda, simbolo di una nuova strada, un necessitato dialogo tra istituzioni e conseguentemente una ritrovata dignità della moda – emancipata dai pregiudizi, sovente considerata unicamente quale bene di consumo -, la quale è una disciplina, una fonte di cultura di egual rango a quello delle arti visive(una dignità riconosciuta da tempo altrove ovvero in plurime istituzioni museali di tutto il mondo), ospite adesso del luogo in cui deve stare: il museo.

Enzo( dress, early 1960,  courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli collection) and Capucci ( Sculpture-dress in satin organza, Box line, 1958, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Enzo( dress, early 1960, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli collection) and Capucci ( Sculpture-dress in satin organza, Box line, 1958, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Lucio Fontana( "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli)" 1968, private collection, Rome), photo by N

Paolo Scheggi “Zone riflesse”( 1963, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Giuseppe Capogrossi, "Superficie 294"( 1958, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Giuseppe Capogrossi, “Superficie 294″( 1958, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

The magazines and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

The magazines and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Un presente ricco di promesse e di energie, di certo diverso dal passato che la mostra racconta, da cui però si evince l’ attualità di segni ed emozioni di tante storie impresse su tessuto. Forme, spazi, colori e suggestioni avveniristiche, ma anche artigianalità che traccia il dna del Made in Italy e dell’ industria della moda italiana che nasce ieri quale fenomeno elitario e sartoriale. Il couturier è l’ interprete e il demiurgo del suo tempo, decodifica in segni e visioni le suggestioni del suo presente. Opere immortali, abiti iconici, quelli di Germana Marucelli, Galitizine e delle Sorelle Fontana, capolavori di sperimentazione e di ironia come la tuta di lapin di Fendi, gli abiti di Capucci e di Emilio Schuberth, che testimonia una moda che va al di là del tempo. Architetture disegnano la femminilità fatta di materia, forma e colori che diventano i riferimenti della mostra. Il bianco e nero, gli abiti da cocktail e da gran sera, le tensioni futuristiche e le forme insolite. 80 sono gli abiti unitamente a plurimi accessori – che comprendono le celebri creazioni di Roberta di Camerino, Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Dal Cò -, i gioielli di Bulgari e la bigiotteria di Coppola e Coppo che raccontano questa vibrante epoca e lo fanno avvalendosi di altri canali di comunicazione: l’ arte contemporanea, il cinema e la fotografia.

The catalogues and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

The catalogues and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Fontana Sisters( 1960, A.N.G.E.L.O Vintage Archive) and Mila Schön ( 1960, private collection), photo by N

Fontana Sisters( 1960, A.N.G.E.L.O Vintage Archive) and Mila Schön ( 1960, private collection), photo by N

 Pasquale De Antonis(1947), photo by N

Pasquale De Antonis(1947), photo by N

Roberta di Camerino( early and mid 1960. courtesy A.N.G.E.L.O. Vintage Archive), photo by N

Roberta di Camerino( early and mid 1960. courtesy A.N.G.E.L.O. Vintage Archive), photo by N

Un ampio apparato documentaristico racconta su pellicola le atmosfere di un epoca e le visioni, enfatizzate dal segno di leggendari registi quali Luchino Visconti – il cui film “Bellissima” è il titolo della mostra -, Federico Fellini, da documentari e dalle fotografie di Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla e Ugo Mulas. I capolavori di Fontana, Burri enfatizzano le aree tematiche del percorso della mostra. L’ abito rosso di Valentino abbinato a un’ opera di Burri, i motivi optical di Alberto Biasi dialogano con l’ abito di Germana Marucelli e molti altri, creando un percorso dinamico, fatto di linee e curve, felici asimmetrie e divagazioni, concretizzate dal set design della mostra, un sentiero metallico presso la grande sala del MAXXI che la ospita al secondo piano, realizzato dai brillanti architetti Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo e Guido Schinklert, fautori di un cammino esperienziale che sovverte i limiti dello spazio ovvero di un’ unica sala e rende fruibile e lieve un percorso espositivo che altrimenti sarebbe potuto divenire oltremodo arduo e poco intellegibile.

Gucci ( Courtesy Gucci Archive), photo by N

Gucci ( courtesy Gucci Archive), photo by N

Alberto Fabiani(reversible wool day overcoat, Spring/Summer 1961, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection) and Pino Lancetti( Wool coat with silk liningm Spring/Summer 1965, City of Venice Museums Foundation- Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Alberto Fabiani(reversible wool day overcoat, Spring/Summer 1961, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection) and Pino Lancetti( Wool coat with silk liningm Spring/Summer 1965, City of Venice Museums Foundation- Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Magazines ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

Magazines ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Un moto impresso anche nei manichini di La Rosa, donne – come insegna Diana Vreeland nelle vesti di curatrice – e idee in movimento. Bellezza e femminilità, un discorso complesso, fatto di molteplici textures – come i frammenti di tessuti e ricami delle Sorelle Fontana – e rievocate da cataloghi, riviste e da una fitta corrispondenza, preziosa documentazione che racconta i rapporti tra i buyer, i clienti e gli atelier, la nascita dell’ industria della moda, della sfilata quale evento di presentazione e vendita del prodotto moda (che avviene per la prima volta il 22 luglio 1952 a Firenze nella Sala Bianca di Palazzo Pitti).

Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Cocktail dress in silk twill with optical motifs, designed by teaming with Getulio Alviani, "Optical collection", Spring/Summer, 1965, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Cocktail dress in silk twill with optical motifs, designed by teaming with Getulio Alviani, “Optical collection”, Spring/Summer, 1965, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Lucio Fontana  "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli) -1968, private collection, Rome,- and Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Lucio Fontana
“Concetto Spaziale – Attese (bianco e due tagli) – 1968, private collection, Rome – and Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Valentino( silk evening pyjama, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A,) and Roberto Capucci, "Omaggio a Vasarely", sculpture-dress inspired by the artist's works with interwoven optical effect satin ribbons and ostrich feathers, 1965, Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Valentino( silk evening pyjama, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A,) and Roberto Capucci, “Omaggio a Vasarely”, sculpture-dress inspired by the artist’s works with interwoven optical effect satin ribbons and ostrich feathers, 1965, Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Un happening arricchito dalla performance dell’ artista Vanessa Beecroft, nota per le sue affiliazioni semiotiche con il mondo della moda, che ha messo in scena per l’ occasione VB74, un tableau vivant fatto di donne avvolte da veli che ritrae e indaga la femminilità, l’ essere e il suo vestimentum. Un’ idea refrigerata, scarnificata che diventa astratta e racchiude in sé quell’ accattivante estetica che ha reso famosa l’ artista. Un’ arte che rappresenta sé stessa e risponde agli interrogativi dell’ essere con il silenzio di corpo e materia, il velo, luci e ombre. Un concetto “staged” che svela in sé la sua essenza.

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Giampiero Mughini, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Giampiero Mughini, photo by N

L’ essenza dell’ inesistente, di quell’ inesistente essente che rappresenta l’ individuo visto da Carmelo Bene, che però non è osceno, fuori scena, ma è e resta in scena per tre ore, durata della performance che si è tenuta anche il 28 novembre al Maxxi in occasione della cena di gala della mostra per la raccolta fondi del MAXXI, evento in cui la moda ha generosamente sostenuto l’ arte, chiamando a sé i suoi più famosi protagonisti unitamente a una pletora di personaggi più e meno noti nelle cronache mondane che, felici e contanti, hanno contribuito al successo della serata – ampiamente raccontata dal sito web Dagospia del brillante e ironico giornalista Roberto D’ Agostino -, una raccolta fondi pari a circa 600.000 Euro (per una istituzione che – come tante altre istituzioni museali italiane – non versa in condizioni felici, soffrendo da mesi, circostanza raccontata da cronache giornalistiche, per il periodo di precarietà e incertezza in cui versa la cultura in Italia, la stessa nazione e la sua popolazione).

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Stefano Tonchi and Maria Luisa Frisa talking with a friend, photo by N

Stefano Tonchi and Maria Luisa Frisa talking with a friend, photo by N

Anche questo è un segnale positivo, che spero sia l’ inizio di un nuovo dialogo più costruttivo, profondo e solido tra le istituzioni museali e il mondo della moda che si sviluppi nel lungo periodo e costruisca nuove vie, semini idee che guardino al lungo periodo e alla cultura, come nutrimento dell’ Italia e delle sue menti, ciò che ci rende pensanti, autonomi e liberi, una forma di cibo necessaria e universale. Mi auguro anche che questo sia il primo passo per realizzare una serie di mostre in materia di moda allestite – non più sporadicamente e sperabilmente non in un’ unica, seppur ampia, sala – nei musei italiani (dicendo ciò penso alla mostra che quest’ anno ha celebrato il made in Italy a Londra, presso il Victoria & Albert Museum e penso anche alle nuove tecnologie di cui dotarsi per render ancor più esaustivo e fruibile il racconto di una mostra).

Mila Schön,  coat in plain-weave double wool with intarsia inspired by Lucio Fontana's cuts, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Giorgio Schön) and Roberto Capucci, "Omaggio a Burri", georgette coat with applied wool elements, inspired by the artist's works, 1969, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Mila Schön, coat in plain-weave double wool with intarsia inspired by Lucio Fontana’s cuts, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Giorgio Schön) and Roberto Capucci, “Omaggio a Burri”, georgette coat with applied wool elements, inspired by the artist’s works, 1969, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Coppola and Toppo, photo by N

Coppola and Toppo, photo by N

Germana Marucelli( 1962. 1967-1968, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( 1962. 1967-1968, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

 

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Anna Magnani, still image from the movie "Bellissima" by Luchino Visconti

Anna Magnani, still image from the movie “Bellissima” by Luchino Visconti, 1951, courtesy National Film Library – Film Experimental Centre

Fashion dialogues with art, telling about the fashion in the atelier and the Italian fashion history, the haute couture from its rise to the late Sixties. That is the core of “Bellissima. The Italy of high fashion 1945-1968”, exhibition curated by Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi and Anna Mattirolo, organized in collaboration with Altaroma and in main partnership with Bulgari which will be opened on 30th November 2014  at 7:30 pm and will be held from 2nd December 2014 to 3rd May 2015 in Rome at the MAXXI Museum. The exhibition talks about high fashion, Italy and its creative synergies, by using photography and art, giving rise to an open dialogue between different disciplines.

A model at the Rome Capitol Museums, behind the Constantine monument,  wearing a dress by Fontana Sisters (1952), photo by Regina Relang (courtesy of Münchner Stadtmuseum, Sammlung Fotografie, Archiv Relang)

A model at the Rome Capitol Museums, behind the Constantine monument, wearing a dress by Fontana Sisters, 1952, photo Regina Relang (courtesy of Münchner Stadtmuseum, Sammlung Fotografie, Archiv Relang)

Fendi Fall/Winter 1967-1968

Fendi Fall/Winter 1967-1968

Original sketch by Karl Lagerfeld, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, photo   © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

Original sketch by Karl Lagerfeld, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, photo © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

The photography by Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla, Ugo Mulas catchs the most important moments of this tale and the artworks by Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri, Paolo Scheggi, Massimo Campigli, Getulio Alviani, Carla Accardi and Giuseppe Capogrossi – coming from the National Gallery of Modern Art – evidence the vital creativity which marked Italy and an age. The creations by couturiers as Germana Marucelli emphasizes the connection existing between art and fashion. It’s a detailed display of fashion, featuring the garnments by Maria Antonelli, Renato Balestra, Biki, Carosa, Roberto Capucci, Gigliola Curiel, Fendi, FontanaSorelle Sisters(as the “Pretino” dress they created in 1955 for Ava Gardner), Irene Galitzine, Fernanda Gattinoni, Mingolini-Guggenheim, Fausto Sarli, Mila Schön, Emilio Schuberth, Simonetta and Fabiani, Valentino, Jole Veneziani along with the accessories by Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Gucci, Roberta di Camerino, jewelry by Bulgari – including the iconic creations “Snakes”- and fashion jewelry by Coppola and Toppo.

Model of Sorelle Botti, photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1947

Dress by Botti Sisters, photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1947

Two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking  in steps of Central State Archive, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1958

Two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking in steps of Central State Archive, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1958

Ugo Mulas, Lungo i Navigli, 1958 photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas,  courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

Ugo Mulas, Lungo i Navigli, 1958,
photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas, courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

The tale of exhibition is embodied in a marvelous catalogue (Electa, € 55.00) opening with a photograph by Garolla, combined with the words by Maria Luisa Frisa revealing what is the core of exhibition, the portrait of couturier and its role, being not just only “a creator, but an individual who observes the society where he lives, questions its many moods, …kneaded by the energy of his time” or bringer and interpret of “Volksgeist”, “The Spirit of people”, in a certain place and time.

Ivy Nicholson wearing a dress by Gattinoni at the Imperial Fora, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1954

Ivy Nicholson wearing a dress by Gattinoni at the Imperial Fora, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1954

 Giovannelli-Sciarra, photo Fortunato Scrimali published in the magazine Bellezza, n. 9, September 1953

Giovannelli-Sciarra, photo Fortunato Scrimali
ft. in the magazine “Bellezza”, n. 9, September 1953

 Ava Gardner wearing the  “Pretino"  dress, (created for her by the Sorelle Fontana  for a film the actress had to play but the film was never made. The  cassock apparel's idea was later taken over by director Federico Fellini for Anita Ekberg in "La Dolce Vita", 1960), 1955, photo Pierluigi Praturlon, courtesy of Historical Archive  Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Ava Gardner wearing the “Pretino” dress, (created for her by the Fontana Sisters for a film the actress had to play but the film was never made. The cassock apparel’s idea was later taken over by Federico Fellini for Anita Ekberg in  the movie “La Dolce Vita”, 1960), 1955, photo Pierluigi Praturlon,
courtesy Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Anita Ekberge ft. in "La dolce vita" by Federico Fellini, 1960, photo Pierluigi Praturlon, courtesy Archivio Fotografico della Cineteca Nazionale - Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia. Fondo Reporters Associati

Anita Ekberg ft. in “La dolce vita” by Federico Fellini, 1960, photo Pierluigi Praturlon, courtesy  Photo Archive of National Film Library – Experimental Film Centre. Fondo Reporters Associati

Bulgari, snake bracelet watch gold, red and green enamel and diamonds, ca1965

Bulgari, snake bracelet watch gold, red and green enamel and diamonds, 1965

Salvatore Ferragamo, Damigella ankle boots (created for Sofia Loren), 1957, photo Christofer Broadbent

Salvatore Ferragamo, Damigella ankle boots (created for Sofia Loren), 1957, photo Christofer Broadbent

Bulgari, Tubogas gold bracelet-watch, ca 1965

Bulgari, Tubogas gold bracelet-watch, 1965

The binomial between art and fashion will be also enriched by VB74, the performance created by Vanessa Beecroft exclusively for the exhibition which will be held during its opening. That makes “Bellissima” a not to be missed event and precious, as it dignifies fashion as source of culture and art, bringing again it in the place where it has to be: the museum. I tell that, thinking that can be a first step towards the path giving rise to a Fashion Museum in Italy or – considering also what it happens in other museums as the New York MET Museum the London Victoria & Albert Museum – of specific areas focused on fashion being into a museum.

LA MODA NELL’ ATELIER: LA MOSTRA “BELLISSIMA. L’ ITALIA DELL’ ALTA MODA 1945-1968” AL MUSEO MAXXI DI ROMA

Still image from the movie "The Barefoot Countess" by  Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1954, photo Osvaldo Civirani, courtesy Archivio Fotografico della Cineteca Nazionale - Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia. Fondo Civirani

Still image from the movie “The Barefoot Countess” by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1954,
photo Osvaldo Civirani, courtesy Photo Archive from the National Film Library – Film Experimental Centre. Fondo Civirani

La moda dialoga con l’ arte, raccontando la moda nell’ atelier, la storia della moda italiana e l’ alta moda dalla sua nascita alla fine degli anni Sessanta. Questo è il cuore di “Bellissima. L’ Italia dell’ alta moda 1945-1968”, mostra curata da Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi ed Anna Mattirolo, organizzata in collaborazione con Altaroma e in main partnership con Bulgari che sarà inaugurata il 30 novembre 2014 alle ore 19.30 e si terrà dal 2 dicembre 2014 al 3 maggio 2015 al Museo MAXXI di Roma. Il percorso espositivo della mostra parla dell’ alta moda, dell’ Italia e delle sue sinergie creative avvalendosi della fotografia e dell’ arte, dando vita un dialogo aperto tra diverse discipline.

Creations by De Gasperi Zezza, Fernanda Gattinoni and Sorelle Fontana - Fontana Sisters -, photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1948,  published in the magazine I Tessili Nuovi. Estate, n. 37, July – August - September 1948

Creations by De Gasperi Zezza, Fernanda Gattinoni and Fontana Sisters,
photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1948,
ft. in the magazine I Tessili Nuovi. Summer, n. 37, July – August – September 1948

Fendi, vison, mink coat, 1960. photo © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

Fendi, mink coat, 1960. photo © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

Fendi, mink coat, 1960

Fendi, mink coat, 1960

La fotografia di Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla, Ugo Mulas cattura i momenti più salienti di questo intenso racconto e le opere di Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri, Paolo Scheggi, Massimo Campigli, Getulio Alviani, Carla Accardi e Giuseppe Capogrossi – provenienti dalla Galleria Nazionale di Arte Moderna – testimoniano la vitale creatività che ha segnato un’ epoca e l’ Italia. Le creazioni di couturiers quali Germana Marucelli enfatizzano il legame tra arte e moda. Una dettagliata rassegna di moda di cui sono protagonisti i capi di Maria Antonelli, Renato Balestra, Biki, Carosa, Roberto Capucci, Gigliola Curiel, Fendi, Sorelle Fontana (come l’ abito “Pretino” da loro creato nel 1955 per Ava Gardner), Irene Galitzine, Fernanda Gattinoni, Mingolini-Guggenheim, Fausto Sarli, Mila Schön, Emilio Schuberth, Simonetta e Fabiani, Valentino, Jole Veneziani unitamente agli accessori di Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Gucci, Roberta di Camerino, i gioielli di Bulgari – comprensivi delle iconiche creazioni “Serpenti” – e la bigiotteria di Coppola e Toppo.

Two creations by De Gasperi Zezza at Museum of the  Baths of Diocletian, photo Pasquale De Antonis, Rome, 1948

Two creations by De Gasperi Zezza at Museum of the Baths of Diocletian, photo Pasquale De Antonis, Rome, 1948

Gina Lollobrigida,  still image from the movie "Come September" (1961) by Robert Mulligan, ©Universal Pictures

Gina Lollobrigida, wearing jewelry by Bulgari, still image from the movie “Come September” by Robert Mulligan, 1962
©Universal Pictures

Anita Ekberg, wearing Bulgari jewelry, still image from the movie "Call me Bwana" by Douglas Gordon, 1962

Anita Ekberg, wearing Bulgari jewelry, still image from the movie “Call me Bwana” by Douglas Gordon, 1962

Il racconto della mostra è racchiuso anche in uno splendido catalogo (Edizioni Electa, € 55.00) che si apre con una foto di Garolla, accompagnato dalle parole di Maria Luisa Frisa che svelano ciò che è il nucleo fondante della mostra, il ritratto del couturier e del suo ruolo, il quale non è soltanto “ un creatore, ma un individuo che scruta la società in cui vive, ne interroga i molteplici umori,..impastato dall’ energia del proprio tempo” ovvero portatore e interprete del “Volksgeist”, lo “Spirito del popolo, in un determinato luogo e tempo.

Creations by Fercioni, photo Elsa Robiola,  ft. in the magazine Bellezza, n. 5, May 1951

Creations by Fercioni, photo Elsa Robiola,
ft. in the magazine Bellezza, n. 5, May 1951

 'Azalea Rosa',  Roberto Capucci, first show: Sala Bianca Palazzo Pitti in Florence, 1961, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive Roberto Capucci Foundation

“Azalea rosa”dress, Roberto Capucci, first show,  Florence Palazzo Pitti White, 1961, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation

1969 'Omaggio a Burri' "Homage to Burri", Roberto Capucci, first show at the Rome Capucci atelier in Via Gregoriana, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive Roberto Capucci Foundation

“Homage to Burri”, Roberto Capucci, first show at the Rome Capucci atelier in Via Gregoriana, 1969, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation

Roberto Capucci, first show, Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive of  Roberto Capucci Foundation

Roberto Capucci, first show, Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, photo Claudia Primangeli,  1959, Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation

Salvatore Ferragamo, "Decolletè",shoes created for Maliryn Monroe in the movie “Bus Stop” by Joshua Logan, 1965, photo Roberto Quagli

Salvatore Ferragamo, “Decolletè”,shoes created for Maliryn Monroe in the movie “Bus Stop” by Joshua Logan, 1965, photo Roberto Quagli

Bulgari, necklace, earrings, gold and platinum with turquoises, sapphires, diamonds, 1961-1962

Bulgari, necklace, earrings, gold and platinum with turquoises, sapphires, diamonds, 1961-1962

Venice, 1966, photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas,  courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

Venice, 1966, photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas, courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

Il binomio tra arte e moda sarà anche arricchito da VB74, la performance creata esclusivamente per la mostra dall’ artista Vanessa Beecroft che si terrà durante la opening. Ciò rende “Bellissima” un evento imperdibile e prezioso, poiché dignifica la moda quale fonte di cultura e di arte, riportandola nel luogo in cui deve stare: il museo. Dico ciò, pensando che questo possa essere un primo passo per il cammino che dia luogo alla nascita di un Museo della Moda in Italia oppure – considerando anche ciò che accade in altre istituzioni museali quali il MET Museum di New York ed il Victoria & Albert Museum di Londra – di specifiche aree dedicate alla moda all’ interno di un museo.

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Sofia Gnoli, celebrated fashion journalist, historian, fashion curator and Professor released today her new book “Moda, dalla nascita della haute couture a oggi” (Carocci, 34,00 Euros), telling about the history of fashion from its rise to contemporary fashion, talking about the most important designers and changes arisen from the realm of fashion. A book to have, precious source of fashion culture, something should – during those dark times especially – be increased in Italy about which the bright author told, focusing on something I deeply agree with her: the recognition of full scientific dignity to fashion in Italy”.

What are the ten-day periods decades and creatives, featuring in your latest book do you think that have emblematically marked Italian fashion?

“It’s hard identifying one only ten-day period. I think every historical age had its own importance. The Thirties were fundamental for giving rise to the consciousness it could exist an Italian fashion being independent from the French one. It has been the time where it has created the National Institution of Fashion, the first public institution for supporting and promoting the Italian fashion, it has been the time of autarchy and genius inventions by Salvatore Ferragamo. Italian fashion during the Forties starts shamefully emerging with names as Marucelli, Fontana sisters, Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò, Fernanda Gattinoni. It has been in the following ten-year period, the Forties, resulting from the Hollywood on Tevere in Rome and the Pitti White Hall in Florence, the great international recognition of Italian style and the rise of fashion boutique with Emilio Pucci, etc. and so on, arriving after the mid-Sixties to the emerging made in Italy, evidencing every ten-day period had its own main features and innovations”.

What do you think of contemporary made in Italy – haute couture, ready-to-wear, demi.couture – and what are its main features?

“After a stop started in the Nineties where it didn’t feature a new generation of creatives, except phenomenons as Antonio Marras and Ennio Capasa, creator of Costume National, didn’t feature new great creatives, it arose from a new heterogeneous generation of Italian creatives in the first ten-day period of Twenty-first century. Someone, working as consultants or having worked as consultant for others brands, established their own brand as Marco De Vincenzo, Giambattista Valli and Sergio Zambon. Other ones became creative directors of renowned international names as Giannini (Gucci), Riccardo Tisci (Givenchy) e Marco Zanini (Rochas). Other ones also held their brand, being or being been creative director of famous brand: Tommaso Aquilano and Roberto Rimondi, Gabriele Colangelo, Francesco Scognamiglio. All of the names evidence how Italian creativity, due to its perfect balance between dream and reality, marketing and fantasy, continues being one of the most desirable ones”.

What are the project you are going to develop?

“The thing I care very much is to improve the culture of Italian fashion. I think our Country should focus on that much more. In fact the fashion in Italy, though it’s one of the biggest entries of turnover, is still  smugly considered in some universities, instead it’s very important. The fashion studies in Italy, comparing them with countries as England, USA and France, are very behind. Then the space given by institution to cultural events, concerning fashion is very little. Instead there are important museums abroad having fashion areas as the New York Metropolitan Museum of the Arts or London Victoria & Albert Museum. Unfortunately in Italy there isn’t anything like that. It’s very hard and dangerous setting up a fashion exhibition, though it’s a really charming work, in fact is one of my forthcoming projects. In fact here in Italy the scientific standards of this subject aren’t codified. I think it’s often forgotten fashion is not an issue about  ruffles and furbelows where everyone can improvise. Fashion is a more serious issue than is commonly considered…”.

“MODA. DALLA NASCITA DELLA HAUTE COUTURE A OGGI”, IL NUOVO LIBRO DI SOFIA GNOLI

Sofia Gnoli

Sofia Gnoli, celebre giornalista, storica della moda, fashion curator e docente ha pubblicato oggi il suo nuovo libro “Moda, dalla nascita della haute couture a oggi” (Carocci, 34,00 Euro) che narra la storia della moda dalla sua nascita alla moda contemporanea, parla dei più importanti designer e dei cambiamenti sorti nell’ ambito della moda. Un libro da avere, preziosa fonte di cultura della moda, qualcosa che dovrebbe essere incrementata – specialmente durante questi tempi oscuri – in Italia della quale la brillante autrice ha parlato, concentrandosi su qualcosa che condivido profondamente: il riconoscimento di piena dignità scientifica alla moda in Italia.

Quali sono le decadi e i creativi, protagonisti del tuo ultimo libro che ritieni abbiano segnato in modo emblematico la moda italiana?

“Difficile individuare un unico decennio. Trovo che ogni momento storico abbia avuto una sua importanza. Gli anni Trenta sono stati fondamentali per far nascere negli italiana la consapevolezza che una moda italiana indipendente da quella francese poteva esistere. Sono stati gli anni in cui è stato creato l’Ente Nazionale della Moda, la prima istituzione pubblica volta a sostenere e promuovere la moda italiana, sono stati gli anni dell’autarchia e delle geniali invenzioni di Salvatore Ferragamo. Negli anni Quaranta la moda italiana, con nomi come Germana Marucelli, Sorelle Fontana, Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò, Fernanda Gattinoni, inizia timidamente ad emergere. Nel decennio successivo, grazie alla Hollywood sul Tevere a Roma e alla Sala Bianca di Pitti a Firenze ci sono stati il grande riconoscimento internazionale dello stile italiano e l’affermarsi della moda boutique con Emilio Pucci, ecc. E così via per arrivare nella seconda metà dei Settanta all’emergente made in Italy. Insomma ogni decennio ha avuto le sue peculiarità e le sue innovazioni…”.

Cosa pensi del made in Italy contemporaneo – alta moda, pret-à-porter e demi-couture – e quali sono i suoi tratti più salienti?

“Dopo una battuta d’arresto iniziata negli anni Novanta, durante i quali, a parte i fenomeni di Antonio Marras ed Ennio Capasa, mente di Costume National, non si sono affermati nuovi grandi creativi, nel corso del primo decennio del Duemila è emersa una generazione di creatori italiani dal carattere eterogeneo. Alcuni, pur effettuando o avendo effettuato consulenze per altri marchi, hanno fondato una loro linea, è il caso di Marco De Vincenzo, Giambattista Valli e Sergio Zambon. Altri sono diventati direttori artistici di importanti griffe internazionali come Frida Giannini (Gucci), Riccardo Tisci (Givenchy) e Marco Zanini (Rochas). Altri ancora hanno mantenuto la loro linea pur essendo o essendo stati art director di noti brand: Tommaso Aquilano e Roberto Rimondi, di Gabriele Colangelo, Francesco Scognamiglio. Tutti nomi che dimostrano come la creatività italiana, per il suo perfetto equilibrio tra realtà e sogno, tra marketing e fantasia, continui a essere tra le più ambite”.

Quali sono i progetti che hai in cantiere?

“Valorizzare la cultura della moda italiana è la cosa che mi sta più a cuore. Trovo che il nostro Paese dovrebbe concentrarsi sempre più in questo senso. In Italia infatti, nonostante sia una delle voci più ingenti del fatturato, la moda è ancora guardata con una certa sufficienza in alcuni ambiti accademici, mentre invece è importantissima. Da noi i fashion studies, rispetto a paesi quali l’Inghilterra, gli Stati Uniti e la Francia, sono molto indietro. Inoltre lo spazio che le istituzioni concedono a iniziative culturali concernenti la moda è molto ridotto. Mentre all’estero ci sono importanti musei con sezioni di moda, è il caso del Metropolitan Museum of the Arts di New York o del Victoria & Albert Museum di Londra. In Italia purtroppo non abbiamo nulla del genere. Inoltre, anche se fare una mostra di moda è senz’altro affascinante, non a caso è uno dei miei prossimi progetti, è molto difficile e pericoloso. Da noi infatti i parametri scientifici di questa disciplina sono ancora poco codificati. Trovo che ci si dimentichi un po’ troppo spesso che la moda non è una questione di volants e falpalà, dove chiunque si può improvvisare. La moda è una cosa molto più seria di quanto si pensi…”.

Crocera Lloyd, Illustrazione Italiana, 6th August 1963

Salvatore Ferragamo and Joan Crawford, 1923, courtesy of Salvatore Ferragamo

Christian Dior along with his collaborators in Avenue Montaigne, courtesy of Christian Dior

Sketch by Capucci, 2011, courtesy of Capucci Foundation

Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò trying a dress for Theo Graham, 1961, photo Leombuno Bodi, courtesy of Archivio Saraceni

Kim Novak wearing a dress by Fernanda Gattinoni, 1957, courtesy of Gattinoni archive

Giuliana Cohen Camerino and Salvador Dalì, 1974, courtesy of Roberta di Camerino archive

Antonia Dell'Atte Fall/Winter 1984-1985, photo by Aldo Fallai, courtesy of Giorgio Armani

Sketch by Gianfranco Ferrè haute-couture Fall/Winter 1986-1987, courtesy of Gianfranco Ferré Foundation

Antonio Marras Spring/Summer 1988, courtesy of Antonio Marras

 

Liz Hurley at the set of “Bedazzled” (2000) wearing the Baguette by Fendi, courtesy of Fendi

 

Prada Spring/Summer 1996, courtesy of Prada

Stefano Dominella, the Micol Fontana's nephew and Bonizza Giordani Aragno

 

It has recently held at the Rome Costume & Fashion Academy the meeting “150 years of Italian fashion: the women who marked fashion” which featured as speakers the fashion historian Bonizza Giordani Aragno, Stefano Dominella, President of fashion house Gattinoni, the Micol Fontana’s nephew, the journalist, fashion and costume historian Sofia Gnoli and the Costume ad set designer Andrea Viotti who explored the Italian fashion and its emblematic personas, women who contributed to the rise of Italian haute couture as the Queen Margherita of Savoy – focusing on her connection to Charles Frederick Worth -, Rosa Genoni, the legendary Elsa Schiaparelli, Rosana Pistolese, eclectic persona and founder of Rome Costume & Fashion Academy, as well as the aristocratic women of fashion as Gabriella di Robilant, Irene Galitzine and Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò. Here it was talked about the connection of fashion to art, film, considering the movie stars, yesterday icons as Ava Gardner, who had a strong friendship with the Fontana sisters – evidenced by the screening of a suggestive documentary where Micol Fontana told about the rise of the haute couture brand – and Ingrid Bergman, customer and friend of Fernanda Gattinoni. Nice tales that evidence the Italian creativity and sartorialism, a long time tradition which made worldwide celebrated the made in Italy.

150 ANNI DI MODA ITALIANA: LE DONNE CHE HANNO SEGNATO LA MODA, UN CONVEGNO ALL’ ACCADEMIA DI COSTUME & MODA DI ROMA

The Queen Margherita of Savoy

Si é recentemente tenuto presso l’’ Accademia di Costume & Moda di Roma il convegno “150 anni di moda italiana: le donne che hanno segnato a moda”, di cui sono stati protagonisti nelle vesti di relatori la storica della moda Bonizza Giordani Aragno, Stefano Dominella, Presidente della casa di moda Gattinoni, la nipote di Micol Fontana, la giornalista, sotrica della moda e del costume Sofia Gnoli ed il costumista e scenografo Andrea Viotti che hanno esplorato la moda italiana ed i suoi emblematici personaggi, donne che hanno contribuito alla nascita dell’ alta moda italiana quali di la regina Margherita di Savoia – concentrandosi sul suo legame con Charles Frederick Worth -, Rosa Genoni, la leggendaria Elsa Schiaparelli, Rosana Pistolese, eclettico personaggio e fondatrice dell’ Accademia di Costume & Moda di Roma, come anche le aristocratiche della moda quali Gabriella di Robilant, Irene Galitzine e Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò. Ivi si è parlato del legame della moda all’ arte, cinema, considerando le star del cinema, icone di ieri quali Ava Gardner che ha avuto una forte amicizia con le sorelle Fontana – testimoniata dalla proiezione di un suggestivo documentario in cui Micol Fontana raccontava della nascita del marchio di alta moda – ed Ingrid Bergman, cliente ed amica di Fernanda Gattinoni. Simpatici racconti che testimoniano la creatività e sartorialità italiana, un’ antica tradizione che ha reso il made in Italy celebre in tutto il mondo.

Charles Frederick Worth

Rosa Genoni

Rosa Genoni

Elsa Schiaparelli

Elsa Schiaparelli

Rosana Pistolese

Rosana Pistolese

Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò

Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò

Irene Galitzine

Galitzine

www.accademiacostmeemoda.it

 

Angelos Bratis during the latest edition of Who Is On Next

The famous Milanese boutique Biffi, featuring in the third edition of Vogue Fashion’s Night Out, which will be held in Milan on 8th September 2011,  will present a limited edition of creations made with the winners of talent-scouting award Who Is On Next latest edition – Angelos Bratis, Alessio Spinelli, Stella Jean, Marta Ferri and CO|TE – of whose proceeds will be donated to support the initiative by the City of Milan “Adopt a tree”. A successful event “for giving rise to something special, trusting on the talent without calculating the personal economic interest, but it’s just for the delight of seeing the development of an idea, a unique feeling”- as Rosy Biffi asserts – in order to showcase the new side of contemporary Italian fashion and supporting young talents. A laudable purpose arising from contemporary times, I consider a kind of parallel to the rise of Haute Couture in Italy during the Forties, age where Mussolini’ s Government due to economic crisis stopped imports of fabrics from France and thus this circumstance  give rise to the yesterday fashion houses as Fontana Sisters, Jole Veneziani, Biki, Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò and many other ones, who later debuted in Florence at Pitti on 12th February 1952, the official birth of Pitti Fashion Fair event – organized by the Marquise Giovanni Battista Giorgini – that connected Italian fashion to foreigner markets. Italy is living a similar kind of crisis – how it evidences the everyday life, also told by media, though the current Government tells fairy tales, asserting that everything is fine -, thus it’s important that the actors of market, along with textile, production and distribution companies trust on the new names of Made in Italy, in order to return to the most bright tradition of ready to wear – now turned into demi-couture, featuring in today fashion along with the alternative of fast-fashion for the mass -, successfully joining quality, the standards and details of a cachy product to an affordable price, satisfying the needs and budget of consumers, increasing investments in this realm. Beyond my critic and constructive approach, I think there is a need to redefine and enhance the market, based on new values, considering the failure of global economy during the latest years, that should to discover a new way to make market and encourage a new way to make fashion, more closely connected to rules of ethical fashion – word evoking its wide meaning that includes the paradigm of sustainability -, where the profit is the final result from a work, creating welfare for all the individuals involved in the making process and promoting elegance with a genuine content. I really wish that other personas of fashion industry will reach the healthy consciousness of Rosy Biffi and start to support concretely the new contemporary Italian fashion.

I VINCITORI DI WHO IS ON NEXT A MILANO PRESSO LA BOUTIQUE DI BIFFI PER

LA FASHION NIGHT’S OUT DI VOGUE

Co|Te during the latest edition of Who Is On Next

La famosa boutique milanese Biffi, protagonista della terza edizione della Fashion’s Night Out di Vogue che si terrà l’ 8settembre 2011 a Milano, presenterà una limited edition di creazioni realizzate dai vincitori dell’ ultima edizione del concorso di talent-scouting  Who Is On Next Angelos Bratis, Alessio Spinelli, Stella Jean, Marta Ferri e CO|TE – i cui proventi saranno donati per supportare l’iniziativa del Comune di Milano “Adotta un albero”. Un felice evento “per dar vita a qualcosa di speciale, confidando nel talento senza calcolare l’interesse economico personale, ma soltanto per il piacere di vedere la consolidazione di un’idea, una sensazione unica”- come afferma Rosy Biffi – al fine di esporre il nuovo lato della moda contemporanea italiana e supportare i giovani talenti. Una lodevole finalità derivante dalla contemporaneità che considero una sorta di parallelo con la nascita dell’alta moda in Italia negli anni Quaranta, epoca  in cui il Governo di Mussolini a causa della crisi economica ha interrotto le importazioni di tessuti dalla Francia e successivamente tale circostanza ha dato inizio allo sviluppo delle case di mode di ieri quali le Sorelle Fontana, Jole Veneziani, Biki, Simonetta Colonna di Cesarò e molti altri che successivamente hanno debuttato il 12 febbraio 1952 a Firenze presso il Pitti, nascita ufficiale dell’ evento fieristico di moda Pitti – organizzato dal marchese Giovanni Battista Giorgini – che ha legato la moda italiana ai mercati stranieri. L’Italia sta vivendo una crisi economica analoga – come si evince dalla quotidianità, raccontata anche dai media, benché l’ attuale Governo racconti favole, affermando che vada tutto bene -, perciò è importante che gli attori del mercato unitamente alle aziende tessili, di produzione e distribuzione confidino nei nuovi nomi del Made in Italy al fine di ritornare alla più brillante tradizione del prêt à porter – mutato successivamente in demi-couture, protagonista della moda attuale unitamente all’alternativa della fast-fashion per la massa – che felicemente unisca la qualità, lo standard ed i dettagli di un prodotto accattivante a un prezzo alla portata di tutti, soddisfi le esigenze e il vincolo di bilancio dei consumatori ed incentivi gli investimenti in questo ambito. Al di là del mio approccio critico e costruttivo, ritengo che esista l’esigenza di ridefinire e migliorare il mercato, basandosi su nuovi valori, considerando il fallimento dell’economia globale negli ultimi anni che dovrebbe riscoprire un nuovo modo di fare mercato, incoraggiando un nuovo modo di fare moda, più strettamente connesso a regole di moda ethical – lemma che evoca la sua ampia accezione, includendo il paradigma della sostenibilità – in cui il profitto è il risultato finale derivante dal lavoro che crea benessere per tutti gli individui coinvolti nel processo produttivo e promuove l’eleganza con un autentico contenuto. Mi auguro davvero che altri personaggi dell’industria della moda raggiungano la salubre consapevolezza di Rosy Biffi e comincino a supportare concretamente la nuova moda contemporanea italiana.

Stella Jean during the latest edition of Who Is On Next

Alessio Spinelli

 

Marta Ferri during the latest edition of Who Is On Next

www.biffi.com