You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘jewelry’ tag.

Women, their uniqueness and the social commitment spent in the realms of health, science research, social commitment – as the great work made by the Palermo no-profit AssociationLiberi di crescere” (which stands as “Free to grow up”), Sicily Association placed at the Palermo hospital fighting against the childhood leukemias and neoplasms, headed by Leonilde (aka Ilde) Vulpetti, who is one of the bright women running for this award – and the valorization of woman’s role will be awarded with the Pandora Women for Tomorrow Award. The renowned jewelry brand launched this laudable initiative under the sign of generosity (the one given by the women which will be chosen by a special jury composed by experts in many areas – as the fashion journalist and social activist Sara Maino – and awarded with a money prize amounting to Euros 15,000, precious source to develop the good done), a value – as well as the sharing -, talking about that humanity I celebrate.

UN RICONOSCIMENTO PER LE DONNE & IL LORO IMPEGNO: IL PREMIO PANDORA DONNE PER IL DOMANI

pandora logo

Le donne, la loro unicità e l’ impegno sociale speso nell’ ambito della salute, della ricerca scientifica, dell’ impegno sociale – come la rilevante opera effettuata dalla Onlus di PalermoLiberi di crescere”, associazione siciliana ubicata presso l’ Ospedale di Palermo che lotta contro le leucemie e neoplasie infantili, guidata da Leonilde (detta Ilde) Vulpetti, una delle brillanti donne che concorrono a questo premio – e la valorizzazione del ruolo della donna saranno priemiati con il Premio Pandora donne per il domani. Il noto marchio di gioielli ha lanciato questa lodevole iniziativa all’ insegna della generosità (quella prestata dalle donne che verranno scelte da una speciale giuria di esperti di svariate aree – che include comprensiva la giornalista di moda e attivista nel sociale Sara Maino – a cui sarà attribuito un premio in denaro che ammonta a 15,000 Euro, preziosa risorsa per consolidare il lavoro svolto), un valore che – come anche la condivisione – parla di quell’ umanità che celebro.

Sara Maino, photo by N

Sara Maino, photo by N

Leonilde Volpetti embracing the mother of a leukemic child

Leonilde (aka Ilde) Vulpetti embracing the mother of a leukemic child

www.pandora.net

Vernissage jewellery

Vernissage jewellery

 

Lysergic insecta dissest” is the new collection by the brand Vernissage jewellery, created by the bright jewellery designer  Ilenia Corti where gold and silver enriches by colored enamels, a precious manufacture evidencing the wise craftsmanship made in Italy by the brand. Vibrant suggestions coming from the natural world, its little hosts are the main features, giving rise to an lyrical tale on contemporary femininity, which is strong and at the same time fragile, emphasized by the illustrations by Ivo Bisignano, joining past and present, depicting iconic personas as Theda Bara, Maya Deren, Virginia Woolf, Lillian Gish,  Liv Ullmann, legendary women who dressed the creations by Ilenia.

“LYSERGIC INSECTA DISSECT”, IL VIBRANTE IMMAGINARIO DI VERNISSAGE JEWELLERY

Vernissage jewellery

Vernissage jewellery

 

Lysergic insecta dissest” è la nuova collezione del brand Vernissage jewellery, creato dalla brillante designer di gioielli Ilenia Corti, in cui l’ oro e l’ argento si arricchiscono di smalti colorati, preziose lavorazioni che testimoniano la sapiente artigianalità del marchio. Protagoniste vibranti suggestioni provenienti dal mondo della natura, dai suoi piccoli ospiti che danno vita a un racconto lirico sulla femminilità contemporanea, forte e al tempo stesso fragile, enfatizzata dalle illustrazioni del talentuoso Ivo Bisignano, che uniscono presente e passato in cui sono ritratti iconici personaggi quali Theda Bara, Maya Deren, Virginia Woolf, Lillian Gish, Liv Ullmann, donne leggendarie che indossano le creazioni di Ilenia.

Vernissage jewellery

Vernissage jewellery

 

Vernissage jewellery

Vernissage jewellery

 

Vernissage jewellry

Vernissage jewellry

 

Vernissage jewellery

Vernissage jewellery

 

Vernissage jewellery

Vernissage jewellery

 

Vernissage jewellery

Vernissage jewellery

 

Ivo Bisignano

Ivo Bisignano

 

Ivo Bisignano

Ivo Bisignano

 

Ivo Bisignano

Ivo Bisignano

 

Ivo Bisignano

Ivo Bisignano

 

Ivo Bisignano

Ivo Bisignano

 

Ivo Bisignano

Ivo Bisignano

 

www.vernissageproject.com

Bruce LaBruce

Bruce LaBruce

Bruce LaBruce, brilliant Canadian filmmaker, photographer and author, who uses queercore, a non conventional aesthetics which questions about the contemporary times, is bringer of libertine and libertarian ideas, turned into films as the celebrated cult-movie “The Raspberry Reich” (the word “Reich” is a clear reference to the psychiatric and philosopher Wilhelm Reich), featuring the slogan “The revolution is my boyfriend”. That became a book, “The Revolution is my boyfriend: The Raspberry Reich and the Subversive Power of Political Porn”, embodying his vibrant thought as well as fashion or rather a collection of t-shirts made in collaboration with Poppsychic including some of the categorical imperatives that are in this movie as “Join the homosexual intifada”. The overwhelming creativity of Bruce also experienced with the olfactive design, giving rise along with the nose Kim Weissange to the perfume “Obscenity by Bruce LaBruce”, fragrance which has launched during the exhibitions, held time ago in Madrid at the La Fresh art gallery and in New York at The Hole gallery, focused on the theme of holy and profane, naturally reinterpreted in his unique way, emphasizing fetish suggestions, grotesque visions and including also a marvelous picture of the iconic actress Rossy de Palma. The packaging of scent, which is available in two editions, the gold and silver one, is as itself a suggestive work, designed by Jonathan Johnson, which depicts a naked woman kneeled on the top of bottle and a drop going down. The bouquet of “perfume is associated” – as Bruce says – “with occult or religious rituals (vetiver, labdanum and oud) along with others aromas that are considered as aphrodisiacal” like patchouli and sandalwood and makes concrete the idea of obscenity (word reminding me the poetry by Carmelo Bene who, considering the theatre, defined the “porn”, “oscene” – to be off the stage as it arises from the ancient Greek language – as the physical place where the act becomes exclusively performative, neither metaphoric, nor representative, as well as it happens in the realm of sport- It’s the body into the porn which is the scene and space of action) or rather the absence of conflict between the religious and sexual, they should be completely complementary”. “The fragrance” – Bruce tells – “is meant to stimulate you sexually, but it also contains holy elements”, that perhaps have healing properties as the water from Lourdes. The launch of this perfume was accompanied by a commercial shot by the filmmaker which poked fun the realm of mainstream perfumes’ commercials and talked about an ethereal woman, who seemed like an angel, went out during the evening, was desperate and got drunk, then came back home and saw her lover, a black male, standing on the bed, image evoking the idea of wild eroticism. Irony, framing a keen mind, is another feature of the artist, also impressed in his latest work in the realm of jewelry, a series of fun sterling silver and rhodinated sterling silver rings (some of them embody the word “LA Zombie”, being the title of a movie he made”), arising from the teaming with the designer Jonathan Johnson. It’s picturesque the Bruce’s universe, peopled by many signs talking about freedom.

OSCENITÀ & RIVOLUZIONE: MODA, FOTOGRAFIA, DESIGN OLFATTIVO, GIOIELLI & LE ALTRE MERAVIGLIE DI BRUCE LABRUCE

Bruce LaBruce, brillante regista, fotografo e scrittore canadese che si avvale del queercore, un’ estetica non convenzionale, la quale critica la contemporaneità, è portatrice di idee libertine e libertarie, trasformate in pellicole quali il celebre cult-movie “The Raspberry Reich” (la parola “Reich” è un chiaro riferimento allo psichiatra e filosofo Wilhelm Reich), in cui appare lo slogan “The revolution is my boyfriend”( “La rivoluzione è il mio ragazzo”). Ciò è divenuto un libro, “The Revolution is my boyfriend: The Raspberry Reich and the Subversive Power of Political Porn”, che racchiude il suo vibrante pensiero come anche moda ovvero una collezione di t-shirt realizzate in collaborazione con Poppsychic, comprensiva di alcuni degli imperativi categorici che ci sono in questo film come “Join the homosexual intifada”(“Unitevi alla intifada omosessuale”). L’ irrefrenabile creatività di Bruce sia è anche sperimentata nel design olfattivo, dando vita insieme al naso Kim Weissange al profumo “Obscenity by Bruce LaBruce”, fragranza che è stata presentata durante le mostre, tenutesi tempo fa a Madrid presso la galleria La Fresh gallery ed a New York presso la galleria The Hole gallery, incentrate sul tema di sacro e profano, naturalmente reinterpretato nel suo modo unico, che enfatizza suggestioni fetish, visioni grottesche e include anche una meravigliosa immagine dell’ iconica attrice Rossy de Palma. Il packaging del profumo, disponibile in due edizioni, gold e silver, è di per sé un’ opera suggestiva, disegnata da Jonathan Johnson, raffigura una donna nuda inginocchiata sulla parte superiore della bottiglia e una goccia che cade giù. Il bouquet del “profumo è associato” – come dice Bruce – “ai rituali del mondo occulto e della religione (vetiver, labdano e oud) unitamente ad altri aromi che sono considerate afrodisiaci” come il patchouli e il sandalo e concretizza felicemente l’ idea di oscenità ( lemma che mi ricorda la poetica di Carmelo Bene, che, prendendo in considerazione il teatro , definiva il “porno”, “l’ osceno” – l’ esser fuori dalla scena, significato derivante dal greco antico – come luogo fisico in cui l’ atto si fa esclusivamente performativo, né metaforico, tantomeno rappresentativo, come avviene nell’ ambito dello sport. È il corpo stesso all’ interno del porno a costituire lo scenario e spazio dell’ azione) o meglio l’ assenza di  conflitto tra il religioso e il sessuale, che dovrebbero essere totalmente complementari”. “La fragranza” – racconta Bruce – “è rivolta alla stimolazione sessuale, ma contiene anche elementi sacri, che probabilmente hanno anche proprietà guaritrici come l’ acqua di Lourdes. Il suo lancio è stato accompagnato da una pubblicità girata dal regista che beffeggiava le pubblicità dei profumi di maistream e parlava di una donna eterea, dalle sembianze angelica, la quale usciva fuori la sera, disperata, si ubriacava, poi, una volta tornata a casa trovava il suo amante, un uomo di colore, a letto, immagine che evoca l’ idea di erotismo selvaggio. L’ ironia, che incornicia una mente acuta, è un’ altro tratto dell’ artista, impresso anche in un suo recente lavoro nell’ ambito dei gioielli, una serie di divertenti anelli d’ argento e argento rodiato( alcuni dei quali incorporano la parola “LA Zombie” che è il titolo di un suo film) che nascono dalla collaborazione con il designer Jonathan Johnson. Un variopinto universo, quello di Bruce, popolato da svariati segni che parlano di libertà.

blab book

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Poppsychic

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Poppsychic

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Poppsychic

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Poppsychic

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Poppsychic

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Poppsychic

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Poppsychic

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Poppsychic

Rossy De Palma, photo by Bruce LaBruce

Rossy De Palma, photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

photo by Bruce LaBruce

Obscenity by Bruce LaBruce

Obscenity by Bruce LaBruce

Obscenity by Bruce LaBruce Silver edition

Obscenity by Bruce LaBruce Silver edition

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Jonathan Johnson

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Jonathan Johnson

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Jonathan Johnson

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Jonathan Johnson

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Jonathan Johnson

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Jonathan Johnson

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Jonathan Johnson

Bruce LaBruce teaming with Jonathan Johnson

  www.brucelabruce.com

Fluon, photo by N

Fluon, photo by N

The iconography of Italy, presented in a neo-pop way, features in “Souvenir d’ Italie”, exhibition which was held at the art gallery Orsorama, owned by the brilliant Matteo Bonelli, placed in Brera, renowned area of Milan city centre and joined art and fashion to celebrate Italian culture. Irony, embodied in the fun photo collages by talented artist Svetlana Schmidt and in the artworks by Fluon – artistic collective and band headed by the eclectic creative, singer, DJ and multi-instrumentist musician Andy, which reinterpreted in a fluorescent way, a leitmotiv its work, objects and personas depicting the Italy as the Ferrari car and Dante -, meets the timeless elegance and uniqueness of the jewelry by Anna Porcu, smashing interpretations of the cameos (some of them are antique cameos, unique pieces, other ones are instead hand-made by Tuscany artisans and combined with silver or gold and leather), evidencing the excellence of made in Italy. It was a pleasant interlude, enriched by colors and nice encounters between friends.

“SOUVENIR D’ ITALIE”, ARTE & MODA PER CELEBRARE LA CULTURA ITALIANA ALLA GALLERIA D’ ARTE ORSORAMA DI MILANO

Svetlana Schmidt, photo courtesy of Matteo Bonelli

Svetlana Schmidt, photo courtesy of Matteo Bonelli

L’ iconografia dell’ Italia, presentata in chiave neo-pop, è la protagonista di neo-pop way, “Souvenir d’ Italie”, mostra che si é tenuta a Milano presso la galleria d’ arte Orsorama, di proprietà del brillante Matteo Bonelli, ubicata a Brera, rinomata area del centro di Milano e ha unito arte e moda per celebrare la cultura italiana. L’ ironia, racchiusa nei divertenti collage di foto di Svetlana Schmidt e nelle opere di Fluon – collettivo artistico e band guidata dall’ eclettico creativo, cantante, DJ e musicista polistrumentista Andy che ha reinterpretato in una fluorescente foggia, un leitmotiv della sua opera, oggetti e personaggi che rappresentano l’ Italia quali la Ferrari e Dante – incontra l’ eleganza senza tempo e l’ unicità dei gioielli di Anna Porcu, formidabili interpretazioni dei cammei (alcuni dei quali sono cammei d’ antiquariato, pezzi unici, mentre altri sono invece realizzati a mano da artigiani toscani e sono abbinati con l’ argento o l’ oro e la pelle) che testimoniano l’ eccellenza del made in Italy. Un piacevole intermezzo, arricchito da colori e simpatici incontri tra amici.

Anna Porcu, photo by N

Anna Porcu, photo by N

Marta Brivio Sforza, Marta Marzotto and Svetlana Schmidt at Orsorama, photo courtesy of Matteo Bonelli

Marta Brivio Sforza, Marta Marzotto and Svetlana Schmidt at Orsorama, photo courtesy of Matteo Bonelli

 

Me, myself & I along with Andy, photo by N

Me, myself & I along with Andy, photo by N

 

Fabrizio Grigolo aka Faber, me, myself & I along with Andy, photo by Angelo Naj Oleari

Fabrizio Grigolo aka Faber, me, myself & I along with Andy, photo by Angelo Naj Oleari

 

Andy, Angelo Naj Oleari and Fabrizio Grigolo aka Faber, photo by N

Andy, Angelo Naj Oleari and Fabrizio Grigolo aka Faber, photo by N

 

Me, myself & I along with Fabrizio Grigolo aka Faber and Andy during the cocktail area at Orsorama, photo courtesy of Matteo Bonelli

Me, myself & I along with Fabrizio Grigolo aka Faber and Andy during the cocktail area at Orsorama, photo courtesy of Matteo Bonelli

 

A circle of friends. Anna Porcu, me, myself and I, Andy, Fabrizio Grigolo aka Faber, Angelo Naj Oleari and his wife, Adriana, photo courtesy of Matteo Bonelli

A circle of friends. Anna Porcu, me, myself and I, Andy, Fabrizio Grigolo aka Faber, Angelo Naj Oleari and his wife, Adriana, photo courtesy of Matteo Bonelli

 

Me, myself & I along with Anna Porcu, photo by N

Me, myself & I along with Anna Porcu, photo by N

 

http://orsorama.com 

The rise of the Paris atelier, space to promote art and fashion, by Lamerti, jewellery brand created by the bright designer and conceptual artist Martina Angius, who expresses herself by using the glass as medium, a dream which can come true through the support of people. I think that creativity and dreams have to be celebrated, increased and shared as well as the value of generosity, thus dear FBFers, I ask you to join with me by participating at the crowd-fund which features in the virtual platform Ulule and giving your modest contribution to make this dream true.

SOSTENIAMO LA NASCITA DELL’ ATELIER PARIGINO DI LAMERTI!

Lamerti

Lamerti

La nascita dell’ atelier, spazio per promuovere arte e moda, di Lamerti, brand di gioielli creato dalla brillante designer e artista concettuale Martina Angius, che si esprime attraverso l’ uso del vetro quale medium, un sogno che può avverarsi grazie al sostegno delle persone. Penso che la creatività e i sogni debbano essere celebrati, incentivati e condivisi come anche il valore della generosità, perciò cari FBFers, vi chiedo di unirvi a me e fare avverare questo sogno, partecipando alla raccolta fondi che appare nella piattaforma virtuale Ulule e offrire dare il vostro modesto contributo per fare avverare questo sogno.

Lamerti

Lamerti

 

Lamerti

Lamerti

 

Lamerti

Lamerti

 

www.lamerti.com

https://vimeo.com/120173990

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

It has recently presented in Milan at Entrata libera, awesome concept store focused on the search in the realm of design, the collection of accessories made in co-branding by Carmina Campus and Vibram making concrete the categorical imperative “Save waste from waste”. An idea developed by Carmina Campus, brand of accessories, jewelry and furniture created by the bright, overwhelming pioneer fashion designer, farm businesswoman and social activist Ilaria Venturini Fendi and shared today with Vibram, renowned brand producing the rubber soles, which gave rise to a smashing collection of bags, made by re-using the rubber – more precisely, as Ilaria told me, the first rubber plate, resulting from the start of productive process and therefore it is useless -, thus taking away this material from the dump and turning into something wonderful. That evidences which can create without destroying, respecting the environment and earth which host us. It’ another way to see life, the world surrounding us, another way of thinking, working, creating, making and producing fashion, which emphasizes the idea of elegance as bringer of value and values. A healthy ethic is embodied in a vibrant aesthetics where it shines the approach of matter- and reminds me of work by Alberto Burri – and refinement. The many bags, as the nice rubber clutch bags are decorated by little, fun patterns made of rubber as well as other items, joining the rubber to other materials as leather and fur and are genuine passé-partout.

SALUBRI IDEE IN MOVIMENTO: IL LANCIO DELLA COLLEZIONE IN CO-BRANDING DI CARMINA CAMPUS & VIBRAM DA ENTRATA LIBERA

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

È stata presentata recentemente a Milano presso Entrata libera, fantastico concept store incentrato sulla ricerca nell’ ambito del design, la collezione di accessori realizzata in co-branding da Carmina Campus e Vibram che concretizza l’ imperativo categorico “Save waste from waste”(ovvero “Salva i rifiuti dai rifiuti”). Un’ idea consolidata da Carmina Campus, brand di accessori, gioielli e componenti di arredo creato dalla brillante, inarrestabile, pionieristica fashion designer, imprenditrice agricola e attivista nel sociale Ilaria Venturini Fendi e condivisa oggi con Vibram, rinomato marchio che produce suole di gomma, che ha dato vita a una formidabile collezione di borse, realizzate mediante il riuso della gomma – più precisamente, come Ilaria mi ha raccontato, la prima lastra di gomma, risultato dell’ inizio del processo produttivo e che pertanto è inutilizzabile -, sottraendo perciò questo materiale alla discarica e trasformandolo in qualcosa di meraviglioso. Ciò dimostra che si può creare senza distruggere, rispettando l’ ambiente e la terra che ci ospita. E’ un altro modo di vedere la vita, il mondo che ci circonda, un altro modo di pensare, lavorare, creare, fare e produrre moda che enfatizza l’ idea di eleganza come portatrice di valore e valori. Una salubre etica è racchiusa in una vibrante estetica in cui splende il sapiente approccio materico – che mi richiama alla mente l’ opera di Alberto Burri – e la raffinatezza. Le varie borse, le clutch di gomma sono decorate da piccoli divertenti motivi di gomma, come anche altri modelli che uniscono la gomma ad altri materiali quali pelle, pelliccia e sono autentici passé-partout.

Ilaria Venturini Fendi showing me an item ft. in the co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

Ilaria Venturini Fendi showing me an item ft. in the co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

 

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

 

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

 

Ilaria Venturini Fendi wearing  a bagle made of rubber elements, photo by N

Ilaria Venturini Fendi wearing a bagle made of rubber elements, photo by N

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

 

Ilaria Venturini Fendi and Enea Roveda, photo by N

Ilaria Venturini Fendi and Enea Roveda, photo by N

 

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

 

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

The co-branding collection by Carmina Campus and Vibram, photo by N

 

The rubber by Vibram, turned into accessories, photo by N

The rubber by Vibram, turned into accessories, photo by N

 

Me, myself & I along with Stephan Hamel, photo by N

Me, myself & I along with Stephan Hamel, photo by N

 

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

 

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

 

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

 

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

 

Me, myself and I along with Meo Fusciuni, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Meo Fusciuni, photo by N

 

Carmina Campus, photo by N

Carmina Campus, photo by N

 

Carmina Campus, photo by N

Carmina Campus, photo by N

 

Me, myself and I along with Pietro Dottor, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Pietro Dottor, photo by N

 

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

 

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera and Alessandro Bocchingher, photo by N

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera and Alessandro Bocchingher, photo by N

 

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

 

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

The design showcase featuring in Entrata libera, photo by N

 

Kissing moment featuring me, myself and I, Ilaria Venturini Fendi and Carlo Alberto, photo by N

Kissing moment featuring me, myself and I, Ilaria Venturini Fendi and Carlo Alberto, photo by N

 

 

www.carminacampus.com

Lines strategy, photo by N

Lines strategy, photo by N

It was recently held in Milan, at Palazzo Visconti, in via Lanzone 2, at the suggestive rooms of an apartment created by the celebrated architect Luigi Caccia Dominioni, the exhibition event “Lines strategy: group of creative families in an interior”, ideated by 5VIE ART+ DESIGN and Nunzia Garoffolo, included in the format of “Fashion at 5 Vie”, macro happening which took place in the 5 Vie district, featuring 15 eventi and trunk-shows, featuring in the calendar of Milan Fashion Week, sponsored by the National Chamber of Buyer and curated by Nunzia Garoffolo which featured the creativity made in Italy by Matteo Thiela, Giulia Marani, Move Cappelli, Olga Pong, Anna Porcu, Bea Bongiasca, SH-Jewels by Stephan Hamel, Mia D’ Arco, Susana Traça, Svetlana Schmidt and Arnoldo Battois. An experiential exhibition path, emphasized by the flair of set-designer Giovanni Ottonello – made by teaming with the Milan Istituto Europeo di Design (IED) – and the furniture created by Luigi Caccia Dominioni, made of presences and absences, lightness, present and past where the suggestions inspired by Visconti, film memories coming from the celebrated movie “Conversation piece” dialogued with the contemporary creativity.

"Bombyx" project by Matteo Thiela, photo by N

“Bombyx” project by Matteo Thiela, photo by N

 

Bombyx project by Matteo Thiela, photo by N

Bombyx project by Matteo Thiela, photo by N

 

Innovation and experimentation, a vibrant aesthetics embodying a healthy ethic, this is the “Bombyx” project by Matteo Thiela, visionary fashion designer who inspired by the silkworm, creating a cloth he patented – made by teaming with a group of homeless women – combining wool, silicon and other materials, some of them have a reflective effect, feature in a series of clothes, suits and long shirts, solemn and austere architectures that evidence his conceptual rigor and are shown in these days, during the Paris Fashion Week, in the windows of renowned concept-store L’ Eclaireur. Fashion meets art, as it is impressed in “Tetris”, the Fall/Winter 2016-2017 collection by Giulia Marani who collaborate with the bright artist Nicola Felice Torcoli, where the patterns impressed in the collage he made found a new context in the soft creations by Giulia, joining comfort, refinement, high-end materials, giving rise to genuine passé-partout.

Giulia Marani along with the works by Nicola Felice Torcoli, photo by N

Giulia Marani along with the works by Nicola Felice Torcoli, photo by N

Olga Pong, photo by N

Olga Pong, photo by N

 

Olga Pong, photo by N

Olga Pong, photo by N

 

A detail ft. in the site-specific installation made by Olga Pong, photo by N

A detail ft. in the site-specific installation made by Olga Pong, photo by N

 

Olga Pong, photo by N

Olga Pong, photo by N

 

Craftsmanship, timeless elegance and precious details talking about excellence are part of the hats by Move Roma, brand created by the milliner Massimiliano Amicucci. Poetry and lightness, paying homage to the nature and its little hosts, are the sign of Olga Pong, milliner, who made head accessories, jewelry and also a delicate site-specific installation by using wood, lace and hanger. Art, antique and design, old and modern, cameo becomes contemporary in the successful reinterpretation of Anna Porcu, Tuscany jewelry who uses antique cameos, as the ones presented during the exhibition event, coming from the mid-seventeenth century, blending gold, silver and hand carved leather. A smashing design along with high jewelry techniques makes concrete the Eastern and Western culture coming together. This is the sign of young and promising jewelry designer Bea Bongiasca which shines in the collection “No Rice No Life” she made where she questions on themes that are strictly connected to the human being, as the necessities, real needs of individual and consumption in a globalized society, an engaging tale under the sign of deepness, lightness and irony. Unusual materials combining precious gems to plastic, give rise to a brilliant reinterpretation of the gorgier concept – depicted by Van Dyck – by SH-JEWELS, brand created by Stephan Hamel in collaboration with Roberta Bini.

Move Roma, photo by N

Move Roma, photo by N

 

Anna Porcu, photo by N

Anna Porcu, photo by N

 

Anna Porcu, photo by N

Anna Porcu, photo by N

 

Bea Bongiasca, photo by N

Bea Bongiasca, photo by N

 

SH-Jewels, photo by N

SH-Jewels, photo by N

 

Mia D' Arco, photo by N

Mia D’ Arco, photo by N

 

Susana Traça, photo by N

Susana Traça, photo by N

 

Susana Traça, photo by N

Susana Traça, photo by N

 

Instead mysticism, the mandala concept is revisited in a pop way by Svetlana Schmidt, genius designer and artist who made collages of whose patterns are transposed in silk scarves and pillows made by Como manufacture. These creations will feature in the 2015 edition of Milanese contemporary art tradeshow MIART. A timeless luxury, precious details and a continuous search of shapes and volumes, combined to a fine craftsmanship are the paradigms of Arnoldo Battois, brand of bags created by Silvano Arnoldo and Massimiliano Battois. These have been the features of event which has opened on Friday 27th February 2015, has run through Sunday 1st March 2015 early afternoon and celebrated by the cocktail-party “Beyond the lines, 5 Vie” which was held the evening of 28th February 2015 featuring the DJ-set of renowned TV, radio persona and social activist Andrea Pellizzari. An interlude under the sign of concept and ideas on the move paying homage to made in Italy and its most vibrant signes talking about contemporary times and uniqueness, enriched by the mellow taste of vines by the wine house Antonutti.

Svetlana Schmidt, photo by N

Svetlana Schmidt, photo by N

 

Arnoldo Battois, photo by N

Arnoldo Battois, photo by N

 

 

LINES STRATEGY: GRUPPO DI FAMIGLIE CREATIVE IN UN INTERNO

 

Lines strategy, photo by N

Lines strategy, photo by N

Si è recentemente tenuto a Milano, a Palazzo Visconti, in via Lanzone 2, presso le suggestive stanze di un appartamento creato dal celebre architetto Luigi Caccia Dominioni, l’ evento espositivo “Lines strategy: gruppo di famiglie creative in un interno”, ideato da 5VIE ART+ DESIGN e da me – incluso nel format di “Fashion at 5 Vie”, macro happening che si è svolto nel distretto di 5 Vie, comprensivo di 15 eventi e presentazioni, inserito nel calendario della settimana della moda milanese -, patrocinato dalla Camera Buyer e da me curato di cui è stata protagonista la creatività made in Italy di Matteo Thiela, Giulia Marani, Move Cappelli, Olga Pong, Anna Porcu, Bea Bongiasca, SH-Jewels by Stephan Hamel, Mia D’ Arco, Susana Traça, Svetlana Schmidt e Arnoldo Battois. Un percorso espositivo esperienziale, enfatizzato dall’ estro del set-designer Giovanni Ottonello – realizzato mediante la gentile collaborazione dell’ Istituto Europeo di Design (IED) di Milano – e dagli arredi creati da Luigi Caccia Dominioni, fatto di presenze e assenze, levità, presente e passato in cui le suggestioni di viscontiana memoria, memorie filmiche tratte dalla celebre pellicola “Gruppo di famiglia in un interno” si univano alla creatività contemporanea.

Matteo Thiela, photo by N

“Bombyx” project by Matteo Thiela, photo by N

 

Innovazione e sperimentazione, un’ estetica vibrante che racchiude un’ etica salubre, questo è il progetto “Bombyx” di Matteo Thiela, visionario fashion designer che si è ispirato alla larva del baco da seta, creando un tessuto da lui brevettato – realizzato effettuando un tutoraggio a un gruppo di donne senza fissa dimora – che unisce lana, silicone e altri materiali alcuni dei quali hanno un effetto catarifrangente, protagonista una serie di abiti, completi e tuniche, architetture, solenni e austere che testimoniano il suo rigore concettuale e in questi giorni, durante la fashion week parigina, sono esposte nelle vetrine del rinomato concept-store L’ Eclaireur. La moda incontra l’ arte, come è impresso in “Tetris”, la collezione autunno/inverno 2016-2017 di Giulia Marani che si è avvalsa della collaborazione del brillante artista Nicola Felice Torcoli, in cui i motivi impressi nei suoi collage tridimensionali hanno trovato un nuovo contesto nelle morbide creazioni di Giulia che uniscono comfort, raffinatezza, alta qualità dei materiali, dando vita ad autentici passè-partout.

Matteo Thiela, photo by N

“Bombyx” project by Matteo Thiela, photo by N

 

Giulia Marani, photo by N

Giulia Marani, photo by N

 

Artigianalità, eleganza senza tempo e dettagli preziosi che parlano di eccellenza sono impressi nei cappelli di Move Roma, brand creato dal designer Massimiliano Amicucci. Poesia e levità, suggestioni esistenzialiste che rendono omaggio alla natura e ai suoi piccoli ospiti sono il segno di Olga Pong, designer di cappelli, cerchietti, gioielli che ha anche realizzato una delicata installazione site-specific avvalendosi di legno, pizzo e fil di ferro. Arte, antiquariato e design, antico e moderno, il cammeo diventa contemporaneo nella felice reinterpretazione di Anna Porcu, designer di gioielli toscana che si avvale di cammei antichi, come quelli presentati nell’ evento espositivo, risalenti alla metà dell’ Ottocento, che uniscono oro, argento e pelle intagliata a mano. Un formidabile design unitamente a tecniche di alta gioielleria concretizza l’ incontro tra la cultura orientale e occidentale. Questo, il segno della giovane e promettente designer di gioielli Bea Bongiasca che splende nella sua collezione “No Rice No Life” in cui si interroga su tematiche strettamente connesse all’ essere uomo, quali le esigenze, i reali bisogni dell’ individuo e il consumismo in una società globalizzata, un racconto avvincente all’ insegna di profondità, leggerezza e ironia. Materiali insoliti che uniscono gemme preziose a plastica, danno vita a una felice rivisitazione del concetto di gorgiera – immortalata nei dipinti di Van Dyck – di SH-JEWELS, brand creato da Stephan Hamel in collaborazione con Roberta Bini.

Mirroring: the hats by Move Roma, photo by N

Mirroring: the hats by Move Roma, photo by N

 

Olga Pong, photo by N

Olga Pong, photo by N

 

Olga Pong, photo by N

Olga Pong, photo by N

 

Olga Pong, photo by N

Olga Pong, photo by N

 

Anna Porcu, photo by N

Anna Porcu, photo by N

 

Bea Bongiasca, photo by N

Bea Bongiasca, photo by N

 

Me, myself & I, Roberta Valentini, Nicola Paccagnella and Bruna Casella, photo by Anna Porcu

Me, myself & I, Roberta Valentini, Nicola Paccagnella and Bruna Casella, photo by Anna Porcu

 

SH-Jewels, photo by N

SH-Jewels, photo by N

Essenzialità, forme che incorporano il gusto e la cultura della tradizione e dell’ artigianalità italiana sono il leitmotiv di Mia D’arco, brand di gioielli che nasce nel 2013 dalla fusione tra lo spirito imprenditoriale dell’attore Luca Argentero con la sua casa di produzione Inside productions e la passione innata per la moda della moglie Myriam Catania e sua sorella Giulia. Una femminilità assertiva e cosmopolita, enfatizzata da un’ accattivante combinazione di segni e culture, è celebrata dalla designer di calzature Susana Traça, la quale ha presentato la “Running strike”, protagonista della collezione autunno/inverno 2015-2016 del marchio che porta il suo nome, una divertente reintepretazione della sneaker che unisce il calzino di camoscio al cavallino stampato unitamente ad altri raffinati materiali.

Mia D' Arco, photo by N

Mia D’ Arco, photo by N

 

Susana Traça, photo by N

Susana Traça, photo by N

Il misticismo, il concetto del mantra è invece rivisitato in chiave pop da Svetlana Schmidt, geniale designer e artista che ha realizzato collages i cui motivi sono stati trasposti su foulard e cuscini di seta di manifattura comasca. Tali creazioni saranno presenti all’ edizione del 2015 della fiera d’ arte contemporanea milanese MIART. Un lusso senza tempo, preziosi dettagli e una continua ricerca di forme e volumi abbinate a una fine artigianalità sono i paradigmi di Arnoldo Battois, marchio di borse creato da Silvano Arnoldo e Massimiliano Battois. Questi, i protagonisti dell’ evento, che si è aperto venerdì 27 febbraio 2015, è proseguito fino al primo pomeriggio di domenica 1 marzo 2015 ed è stato celebrato dal party “Beyond the lines, 5 Vie” tenuto in serata il 28 febbraio 2015 con il DJ set del noto personaggio televisivo, radiofonico e attivista nel sociale Andrea Pellizzari. Un interludio all’ insegna di concetti e idee in movimento che rendono omaggio al made in Italy ed ai suoi segni più vibranti che parlano di eccellenza, contemporaneità e unicità, arricchito dal suadente gusto dei vini della casa vinicola Antonutti.

Svetlana Schmidt, photo by N

Svetlana Schmidt, photo by N

 

Svetlana Schmidt, photo by N

Svetlana Schmidt, photo by N

 

Svetlana Schmidt, photo by N

Svetlana Schmidt, photo by N

 

Arnoldo Battois, photo by N

Arnoldo Battois, photo by N

 

Elisa Pervinca Bellini and the set-designer Giovanni Ottonello, photo by N

Elisa Pervinca Bellini and the set-designer Giovanni Ottonello, photo by N

 

Me, myself & I along with Stephan Hamel and Monica Re, photo by N

Me, myself & I along with Stephan Hamel and Monica Re, photo by Nicola Paccagnella

 

Me, myself & I along with Angelo Cruciani, photo by N

Me, myself & I along with Angelo Cruciani, photo by N

 

Me, myself & I along with Anna Porcu and Roberta Valentini, photo by N

Me, myself & I along with Anna Porcu and Roberta Valentini, photo by N

 

Me, myself & I along with Bea Bongiasca and Andreina Longhi, photo by N

Me, myself & I along with Bea Bongiasca and Andreina Longhi, photo by N

 

Me, myself & I along with Giovanni Ottonello, photo by N

Me, myself & I along with Giovanni Ottonello, photo by N

 

Lines strategy, photo by N

Lines strategy, photo by N

 

Bea Bongiasca

Bea Bongiasca

 

The Antonella Villanova Design Gallery presents in Miami during the design event Miami Art Basel( running through 7th December 2014) “Happy-go-Cola” the debut collection by the young jewelry designer Bea Bongiasca. Precious creations tell about the dialogue between two cultures, East and West, its values and non-values as the Western compulsive consumption, represented by the bottles of soft drink and symbols of Kawaii engravings, talking about that desire of happiness through the lightness which is part of contemporary youth. Bea gives rise through her work to a landscape where it these two cultures blends themselves, giving rise to a playful language, impressed on the surface of jewelry she makes, embodying deep and vibrant ideas.

“HAPPY-GO-COLA”: LA LEGGEREZZA, IRONIA & PROFONDITÀ DI BEA BONGIASCA PROTAGONISTA DI ART BASEL MIAMI 2014

Bea Bongiasca

Bea Bongiasca

 

La Galleria di Design Antonella Villanova presenta a Miami in occasione dell’ evento di design Miami Art Basel( che prosegue fino al 7 dicembre 2014) “Happy-go-Cola” la collezione di debutto della giovane designer di gioielli Bea Bongiasca. Preziose creazioni raccontano del dialogo tra due culture, Oriente e Occidente, i suoi valori e disvalori quali il compulsivo consumismo occidentale, rappresentato dalle bottiglie della bibita ed i simboli di incisioni kawaii che parlano di quel desiderio di felicità attraverso la leggerezza che è parte della gioventù contemporanea. Bea mediante il suo lavoro da vita a un terzo paesaggio in cui queste due culture si fondono, dando vita a un linguaggio ludico, impresso sulla superficie dei suoi gioielli, che racchiudono in sé profonde e vibranti idee.

Bea Bongiasca

Bea Bongiasca

 

Bea Bongiasca

Bea Bongiasca

 

Bea Bongiasca

Bea Bongiasca

 

Bea Bongiasca

Bea Bongiasca

 

Bea Bongiasca

Bea Bongiasca

 

Bea Bongiasca

Bea Bongiasca

 

Bea Bongiasca

Bea Bongiasca

 

 

 

www.beatricebongiasca.com

photo by N

photo by N

It’ s a modern day, a Sunday afternoon spent under the sign of fashion, high fashion and art. “To live with art”, categorical imperative of high fashion and Italy during the years 1945-1968. That is the core of “Bellissima. The Italy of high fashion 1945-1968”, exhibition opened on Sunday 30th November 2014 in Rome(where it was also held during the same day at the Auditorium della Musica the concert of legendary band of industrial music Einstuerzende Neubauten, a missed appointment) at the MAXXI Museum – running through 3rd May 2015 -, curated by Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi and Anna Mattirolo, organized in collaboration with Altaroma and Bulgari which is its main partner.

Roland Sejko, Simmetries of light Vol. III. courtesy Istituto Luce Cinecittà Srl

Roland Sejko, “Simmetries of light Vol. III”. Istituto Luce Cinecittà Srl, photo by N

Dresses by Germana Marucelli( Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Germana Marucelli archive),  and Roberto Capucci(1967, courtesy Roberto Capucci Archive) along with the artworks "Inter-ena-cubo", by Paolo Scheggi(1969, Carla and Cosimo Scheggi collection)

Dresses by Germana Marucelli( Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Germana Marucelli archive), and Roberto Capucci(1967, courtesy Roberto Capucci Archive) along with the artworks “Inter-ena-cubo”, by Paolo Scheggi(1969, Carla and Cosimo Scheggi collection), photo by N

Bulgari, the jewelry featuring in the "Snakes" collection(1965) Bulgari Heritage collection), photo by N

Bulgari, the jewelry featuring in the “Snakes” collection(1965) Bulgari Heritage collection), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( evening dress with bodice and belt in anodized aluminum, designed in collaboration with the artist Getulio Alviani, Alluminio collection, Spring/Summer 1969, private collection) and Emilio Pucci( lurex evening dress with jewelry clasp, Spring/Summer 1967, Emilio Pucci Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( evening dress with bodice and belt in anodized aluminum, designed in collaboration with the artist Getulio Alviani, Alluminio collection, Spring/Summer 1969, private collection) and Emilio Pucci( lurex evening dress with jewelry clasp, Spring/Summer 1967, Emilio Pucci Archive), photo by N

Getulio Alviani, "Forma"(1961, private collection, Pescara), photo by N

Getulio Alviani, “Forma”(1961, private collection, Pescara), photo by N

A story of art and poetry, the story of a nation, the Italy and its creativity, also impressed in the pages of a wonderful book which is much more than a catalogue of an exhibition, it’s an anthological work, full of documents, signs and visions that reorganize and rebuild an age in a syncretic way, giving rise to a red drop with the ready to wear from the following decades, the demi-couture and the contemporary creative language. And Rome, city which yesterday gave rise to these many creative alchemies, open dialogues and blends between art, film and fashion, becomes today its witness. All happens in an afternoon and finally in a museum. An important signal of a renovated sharing between art and fashion, representing a new way, a necessary dialogue between institutions and consequently a rediscovered dignity of fashion – emancipated from the prejudices, often considered only as consumer goods – which is a discipline, a source of culture having the same rank of the visual arts (a dignity recognized from a long time elsewhere or rather in many worldwide museums), hosted now by the place where it must be: the museum.

Federico Forquet( silk Evening jumpsuit with sequins owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, about 1967-1968, Courtesy Galleria del Costume di Palazzo Pitti - Donazione Tirelli), photo by N

Federico Forquet( silk evening jumpsuit with sequins owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, about 1967-1968, Courtesy Galleria del Costume di Palazzo Pitti – Donazione Tirelli) and Galitzine(Evening Pyjama, made of fringed jersey with braiding, crystals and glass beads, Fall/Winter 1960-1961, Label: Irene Galitzine Rome; label: Neiman Marcus), photo by N

Tiziani, designed by Karl Lagerfeld (evening dress made of silk crêpon, embroidered with glass beads, owned by Catherine Spaak, Fall/Winter 1967/1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti’s Galleria del Costume –Donazione Tirelli), photo by N

Tiziani, designed by Karl Lagerfeld (evening dress made of silk crêpon, embroidered with glass beads, owned by Catherine Spaak, Fall/Winter 1967/1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery –Donation by Tirelli), photo by N

Mila Schön, silk organza evening gown embroidered with medallions of pearls, rhinestones and sequins, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Fashion house Mila Schön’s Archive), photo by N

Mila Schön, (silk organza evening gown embroidered with medallions of pearls, rhinestones and sequins, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Fashion house Mila Schön’s Archive), photo by N

 Mila Schön (tulle evening dress, embroidered with beads, owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, courtesy  Palazzo Pitti  Costume Gallery- Tirelli donation), photo by N


Mila Schön (tulle evening dress, embroidered with beads, owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery- Donation by Tirelli), photo by N

Germana Marucelli(evening dress with sequins and silk embroidery from patterns by Pietro Zuffi, "Impero" collection, 1967, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive) and Jole Veneziani (organza short dress embroidered with stripes, sequins and jais, Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Veneziani Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli(evening dress with sequins and silk embroidery from patterns by Pietro Zuffi, “Impero” collection, 1967, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive) and Jole Veneziani (organza short dress embroidered with stripes, sequins and jais, Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Veneziani Archive), photo by N

It’s a present full of promises and energies, though it’s different from the past which exhibition tells about, from which it arises the modernity of signs, and emotions of the many stories impressed on the cloth. Shapes, spaces, colors and avant-garde suggestions, as well as craftsmanship tracing the DNA of Made in Italy and Italian fashion industry which is born yesterday as elitist and sartorial phenomenon. The couturier is the interpret and demiurge, decoding the suggestions coming from his time. Eternal works, iconic clothes, the ones by Germana Marucelli, Galitizine and Fontana Sisters, masterpieces of experimentation and irony as the lapin jumpsuit by Fendi, the dresses by Capucci and Emilio Schuberth show a fashion going beyond time. Architectures draw the femininity, made of matter, shape and colors becoming the references of exhibition. Black and white, cocktail and evening dresses, futuristic tensions and unusual lines. 80 are the clothes on show along with many accessories – including the celebrated creations by Roberta di Camerino, Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Dal Cò -, the jewelry by Bulgari and fashion jewelry by Coppola and Coppo telling about this vibrant age and do that by using other channels of communications: contemporary art, film and photography.

Galitzine( silk shantung Pyjama with shirt fully embroidered  with gold leaves and glass crystals, trousers with the same polka dot embroidered motif, 1962, label: Irene Galitzine, Rome, courtesy Galitzine Archive), photo by N

Galitzine( silk shantung Pyjama with shirt fully embroidered with gold leaves and glass crystals, trousers with the same polka dot embroidered motif, 1962, label: Irene Galitzine, Rome, courtesy Galitzine Archive), photo by N

Catalogues and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

Catalogues and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Fragiacomo( 1960, courtesy Fragiacomo) and Cavallera(1950, Courtesy City of Venice Museums - Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Fragiacomo( 1960, courtesy Fragiacomo) and Cavallera(1950, Courtesy City of Venice Museums – Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Valentino ( tulle short evening dress featuring drapes giving rise to roses, Spring/Summer 1959, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Valentino ( tulle short evening dress featuring drapes giving rise to roses, Spring/Summer 1959, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Alberto Burri, "Rosso plastica"(1961, private collection), photo by N

Alberto Burri, “Rosso plastica”(1961, private collection), photo by N

A wide setup of documents tells on film about the atmospheres of age, emphasized by the movies of legendary filmmakers as Luchino Visconti – “Bellissima”, the movie he made, is the title of exhibition -, Federico Fellini, film documentaries and photography by Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla and Ugo Mulas. The masterpieces by Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri highlight the thematic areas of exhibition path. The red dress by Valentino is matched to a work by Alberto Burri, the optical patterns by Alberto Biasi dialogue with the dress by Germana Marucelli and many others, creating a dynamic path made of lines, curves, successful asymmetries and divagations, made concrete by the set design of exhibition, a metallic path being at the wide room of MAXXI hosting it at the second floor, made by the bright architects  Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo and Guido Schinklert, makers of an experiential path, subverting the limits of space of a sole room and making usable and light an exhibition path which otherwise could become very hard and less intelligible.

Alberto Burri, "Ferro"(1960, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Alberto Burri, “Ferro”(1960, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Simonetta(two-pieces cocktail dress, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Simonetta(two-pieces cocktail dress, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Me,myself and I along wiith Adrien Yakimov, photo by N

Me,myself and I along wiith Adrien Yakimov, photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(cocktail dress,  owned by Lucy D' Albert, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(cocktail dress, owned by Lucy D’ Albert, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Marcello Mastroianni ft. in the movie "8 1/2" by Federico Fellini, photo by N

Marcello Mastroianni ft. in the movie “8 1/2” by Federico Fellini, photo by N

A motion featuring also in the mannequins by La Rosa, women – as it teaches the genius Diana Vreeland in her work as curator – and ideas on the move. Beauty and femininity, a complex talk, made of textures – as the fragments of cloths and embroideries by Fontana Sisters – and retraced by catalogues, magazines and a copious mail, precious documents telling about the relationships between the buyers, customers and ateliers, the rise of fashion industry, fashion show as event presenting and selling the fashion product (which happens for the first time on 22nd July 1952 in Florence at the Palazzo Pitti White Room).

Evening dresses by Roberto Capucci(“Azalea rosa”dress, Roberto Capucci, first show,  Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, 1961,Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), Valentino(evening dress in hand-painted sillk satin, Spring/Summer 1968, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.) and Emilio Schuberth(evening gown in silk satin with silk embroidery and glass beads,1951, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private collection), photo by N

Evening dresses by Roberto Capucci(“Azalea rosa”dress, Roberto Capucci, first show, Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, 1961,Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), Valentino(evening dress in hand-painted sillk satin, Spring/Summer 1968, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.) and Emilio Schuberth(evening gown in silk satin with silk embroidery and glass beads,1951, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private collection), photo by N

Video documenting "La settimana Incom( 1947), photo by N

Video documenting “La settimana Incom( 1947), photo by N

Botti Sisters(Evening dress in silk faille and rebrodè lace, 1957, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection) and Fontana Sisters(evening dress in damask silk with rose motifs and panel secured to the back, inspired by the traditional Japanese clothes, owned by Palma Bucarelli, 1957, courtesy Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Botti Sisters(evening dress in silk faille and rebrodè lace, 1957, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection) and Fontana Sisters(evening dress in damask silk with rose motifs and panel secured to the back, inspired by the traditional Japanese clothes, owned by Palma Bucarelli, 1957, courtesy Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Bulgari ( gold necklace with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967,  gold earrings with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, "Melone" gold vanity case with diamonds, 1960, Bulgari Heritage Collection), photo by N

Bulgari ( gold necklace with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, gold earrings with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, “Melone” gold vanity case with diamonds, 1960, Bulgari Heritage Collection), photo by N

Bulgari,  photo by N

Bulgari, photo by N

A happening enriched by the performance of artist Vanessa Beecroft, known for her semiotic affiliation with the fashion world, who staged exclusively for the event VB74, a tableau vivant made of women wrapped by veils, depicting and looking into femininity, the being and its clothing. A cooled, stripped idea which becomes abstract and embodies that catchy aesthetics which made famous the artist. An art which represents itself and answers to the questions of being through the silence of body and matter, the veil, lights and shadows. A “staged” idea revealing the essence by itself.

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Vanessa Beecroft talking with the professor Monica Bolzoni, photo by N

Vanessa Beecroft talking with the professor Monica Bolzoni, photo by N

Essence of the non-existent, that being non-existent which represents the individual seen by Carmelo Bene, though it’s not obscene, out of the stage, but it is and stays in the stage for three hours, the duration of performance which was also held on 28th November at the MAXXI for the gala dinner of exhibition for the MAXXI’s fund-raising, event where generously fashion supported art, calling its most famous features along with a plethora of more and less famous personas, known in the socialite news sections who, happy and cash, contributed to the success of evening – widely told by the website Dagospia of brilliant and ironic journalist Roberto D’ Agostino -, a fund-raising amounting to about 600.000 Euros (for an institution which – as many others Italian museums is not very well -, suffering since months, circumstances which is often told by news, resulting from the moment of precariousness and uncertainty the culture in Italy, its country and people experience).

Fontana Sisters( embroideries on cloth, 1949, 1964, 1953, Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Fontana Sisters( embroideries on cloth, 1949, 1964, 1953, Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Fernanda Gattinoni( short evening dress in moiré silk with velved and satin, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, evening cape in velvet with satin lining, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, two pieces evening dress, trousers in marocain crêpe silk  and blouse in silk organza, work by Anna Magnani, 1956, Historical Archive Fernanda and Raniero Gattinoni), photo by N

Fernanda Gattinoni( short evening dress in moiré silk with velved and satin, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, evening cape in velvet with satin lining, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, two pieces evening dress, trousers in marocain crêpe silk and blouse in silk organza, work by Anna Magnani, 1956, Historical Archive Fernanda and Raniero Gattinoni), photo by N

Ava Gardner wearing the “Pretino” dress, (created for her by the Fontana Sisters, "Pretino" dress, 1955, courtesy Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Ava Gardner wearing the “Pretino” dress, (created for her by the Fontana Sisters, “Pretino” dress, 1955,
courtesy Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Salvatore Ferragamo( décolleté shoe made in glided kid, made for Marylin Monroe for the movie by Joshua Logan "Bus stop", 1967,  décolleté shoe in satin with rhinestones appliques and stiletto heel,owned by Marylin Monroe, 1958-1959, décolleté show made of crocodile leather created for Marilyn Monroe, 1958-1959, "Damigella" ankle boot in stretch brocade-effect silk fabric, created for Sophia Loren, 1957, "Madonna", closed-toe sandal with vamp bearing flowers embroidered in silk, glass beads and rhinestones, created for Sophia Loren, 1955, "Ranina" sandal with upper in Tavernelle lace and sequin appliqués, lining in transparent vinilite, flared  Louis XV heel, made for Anna Magnani, 1955, Courtesy Salvatore Ferragamo Museum), photo by N

Salvatore Ferragamo( décolleté shoe made in glided kid, made for Marylin Monroe for the movie by Joshua Logan “Bus stop”, 1967, décolleté shoe in satin with rhinestones appliques and stiletto heel,owned by Marylin Monroe, 1958-1959, décolleté show made of crocodile leather created for Marilyn Monroe, 1958-1959, “Damigella” ankle boot in stretch brocade-effect silk fabric, created for Sophia Loren, 1957, “Madonna”, closed-toe sandal with vamp bearing flowers embroidered in silk, glass beads and rhinestones, created for Sophia Loren, 1955, “Ranina” sandal with upper in Tavernelle lace and sequin appliqués, lining in transparent vinilite, flared Louis XV heel, made for Anna Magnani, 1955, Courtesy Salvatore Ferragamo Museum), photo by N

Mingolini Guggenheim, short evening dress in organza, owned by Silvana Pampanini, late 1960, Courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery - Tirelli Donation) and Fausto Sarli ( short evening dress in fabric embroidered with pearls, Swarovski crystals and glass baguettes designed for Mina ft. in the "Studio Uno" TV program, mid-1960, courtesy Atelier Sarli Couture), photo by N

Mingolini Guggenheim, short evening dress in organza, owned by Silvana Pampanini, late 1960, Courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery – Tirelli Donation) and Fausto Sarli ( short evening dress in fabric embroidered with pearls, Swarovski crystals and glass baguettes designed for Mina ft. in the “Studio Uno” TV program, mid-1960, courtesy Atelier Sarli Couture), photo by N

That is also a positive sign, I hope it’s the beginning of a new dialogue being more productive, deep and solid between the museums and the fashion world to develop in a long term period and build new ways, sow ideas looking at the culture as food for Italy and its minds, what makes us thinking, autonomous and free, a kind of food being necessary and universal. I also wish that is the first step for making a series of exhibitions on fashion that are – not set up sporadically and hopefully not set up in a sole, though it’s wide, room – set up in the Italian museums (telling that I think about the exhibition which during this year celebrated the Made in Italy in London, at the Victoria & Albert Museum and I also think about the new technologies to use to make more complete and understandably the tale of an exhibition).

UNA GIORNATA MODERNA: L’ INAUGURAZIONE DI “BELLISSIMA. L’ ITALIA DELL’ ALTA MODA 1945-1968” AL MUSEO MAXXI DI ROMA

Federico Garolla(two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking in steps of Central State Archive, Rome, 1958), photo by N

Federico Garolla(two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking in steps of Central State Archive, Rome, 1958), photo by N

Una giornata moderna, una domenica pomeriggio passata all’ insegna della moda, dell’ alta moda e dell’ arte. “Vivere con arte”, imperativo categorico dell’ alta moda e l’ Italia durante gli anni 1945-1968. Questo il cuore di “Bellissima”, mostra inaugurata domenica 30 novembre 2014 a Roma (in cui si è anche tenuto nello stesso giorno all’ Auditorium della Musica il concerto della leggendaria band di musica industrial Einstuerzende Neubauten, un appuntamento mancato) presso il MAXXI – che prosegue fino al 3 maggio 2015 -, curata da Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi e Anna Mattirolo, organizzata in collaborazione con Altaroma e Bulgari che ne è il main partner.

Emilio Schuberth(tulle dress, decorated with beads and sequins in floral motifs, worn by Gina Lollobrigida, about 1953, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection), photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(tulle dress, decorated with beads and sequins in floral motifs, worn by Gina Lollobrigida, about 1953, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection), photo by N

Fendi (Jumpsuit in black rabbit, with diagonally symmetric pattern, adorned with jewel buttons, chiffon and lace on the collar and wrists, Fall/Winter 1067-1968, Fendi Historical Archive) and Valentino (ensemble in cotton mikado, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Fendi (Jumpsuit in black rabbit, with diagonally symmetric pattern, adorned with jewel buttons, chiffon and lace on the collar and wrists, Fall/Winter 1067-1968, Fendi Historical Archive) and Valentino (ensemble in cotton mikado, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Fendi (mink coat, 1960, Fendi historical archive), photo by N

Fendi (mink coat, 1960, Fendi historical archive), photo by N

"Bellissima", fashion and the art by Lucio Fontana( "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli)" 1968, private collection, Rome), photo by N

“Bellissima”, fashion and the art by Paolo Scheggi (“Zone riflessse”, 1963,  National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Paolo Scheggi “Zone riflesse”( 1963, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome),

Una storia d’ arte e di poesia, la storia di una nazione, l’ Italia e della sua creatività, impressa anche nelle pagine di un libro che è più di un catalogo di una mostra,opera antologica da avere, colma di documentazioni, segni, visioni che riordinano e costruiscono un’ epoca in chiave sincretica, dando vita a un “fil rouge” con il prêt à porter dei decenni successivi, il demi-couture e il linguaggio creativo contemporaneo. E Roma, città che ha dato vita ieri a queste plurime alchimie creative, dialoghi aperti e contaminazioni tra arte, cinema e moda, ne diventa oggi la testimone. Accade tutto in un pomeriggio e finalmente in un museo. Un segnale importante di una rinnovata condivisione tra arte e moda, simbolo di una nuova strada, un necessitato dialogo tra istituzioni e conseguentemente una ritrovata dignità della moda – emancipata dai pregiudizi, sovente considerata unicamente quale bene di consumo -, la quale è una disciplina, una fonte di cultura di egual rango a quello delle arti visive(una dignità riconosciuta da tempo altrove ovvero in plurime istituzioni museali di tutto il mondo), ospite adesso del luogo in cui deve stare: il museo.

Enzo( dress, early 1960,  courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli collection) and Capucci ( Sculpture-dress in satin organza, Box line, 1958, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Enzo( dress, early 1960, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli collection) and Capucci ( Sculpture-dress in satin organza, Box line, 1958, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Lucio Fontana( "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli)" 1968, private collection, Rome), photo by N

Paolo Scheggi “Zone riflesse”( 1963, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Giuseppe Capogrossi, "Superficie 294"( 1958, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Giuseppe Capogrossi, “Superficie 294″( 1958, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

The magazines and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

The magazines and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Un presente ricco di promesse e di energie, di certo diverso dal passato che la mostra racconta, da cui però si evince l’ attualità di segni ed emozioni di tante storie impresse su tessuto. Forme, spazi, colori e suggestioni avveniristiche, ma anche artigianalità che traccia il dna del Made in Italy e dell’ industria della moda italiana che nasce ieri quale fenomeno elitario e sartoriale. Il couturier è l’ interprete e il demiurgo del suo tempo, decodifica in segni e visioni le suggestioni del suo presente. Opere immortali, abiti iconici, quelli di Germana Marucelli, Galitizine e delle Sorelle Fontana, capolavori di sperimentazione e di ironia come la tuta di lapin di Fendi, gli abiti di Capucci e di Emilio Schuberth, che testimonia una moda che va al di là del tempo. Architetture disegnano la femminilità fatta di materia, forma e colori che diventano i riferimenti della mostra. Il bianco e nero, gli abiti da cocktail e da gran sera, le tensioni futuristiche e le forme insolite. 80 sono gli abiti unitamente a plurimi accessori – che comprendono le celebri creazioni di Roberta di Camerino, Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Dal Cò -, i gioielli di Bulgari e la bigiotteria di Coppola e Coppo che raccontano questa vibrante epoca e lo fanno avvalendosi di altri canali di comunicazione: l’ arte contemporanea, il cinema e la fotografia.

The catalogues and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

The catalogues and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Fontana Sisters( 1960, A.N.G.E.L.O Vintage Archive) and Mila Schön ( 1960, private collection), photo by N

Fontana Sisters( 1960, A.N.G.E.L.O Vintage Archive) and Mila Schön ( 1960, private collection), photo by N

 Pasquale De Antonis(1947), photo by N

Pasquale De Antonis(1947), photo by N

Roberta di Camerino( early and mid 1960. courtesy A.N.G.E.L.O. Vintage Archive), photo by N

Roberta di Camerino( early and mid 1960. courtesy A.N.G.E.L.O. Vintage Archive), photo by N

Un ampio apparato documentaristico racconta su pellicola le atmosfere di un epoca e le visioni, enfatizzate dal segno di leggendari registi quali Luchino Visconti – il cui film “Bellissima” è il titolo della mostra -, Federico Fellini, da documentari e dalle fotografie di Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla e Ugo Mulas. I capolavori di Fontana, Burri enfatizzano le aree tematiche del percorso della mostra. L’ abito rosso di Valentino abbinato a un’ opera di Burri, i motivi optical di Alberto Biasi dialogano con l’ abito di Germana Marucelli e molti altri, creando un percorso dinamico, fatto di linee e curve, felici asimmetrie e divagazioni, concretizzate dal set design della mostra, un sentiero metallico presso la grande sala del MAXXI che la ospita al secondo piano, realizzato dai brillanti architetti Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo e Guido Schinklert, fautori di un cammino esperienziale che sovverte i limiti dello spazio ovvero di un’ unica sala e rende fruibile e lieve un percorso espositivo che altrimenti sarebbe potuto divenire oltremodo arduo e poco intellegibile.

Gucci ( Courtesy Gucci Archive), photo by N

Gucci ( courtesy Gucci Archive), photo by N

Alberto Fabiani(reversible wool day overcoat, Spring/Summer 1961, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection) and Pino Lancetti( Wool coat with silk liningm Spring/Summer 1965, City of Venice Museums Foundation- Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Alberto Fabiani(reversible wool day overcoat, Spring/Summer 1961, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection) and Pino Lancetti( Wool coat with silk liningm Spring/Summer 1965, City of Venice Museums Foundation- Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Magazines ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

Magazines ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Un moto impresso anche nei manichini di La Rosa, donne – come insegna Diana Vreeland nelle vesti di curatrice – e idee in movimento. Bellezza e femminilità, un discorso complesso, fatto di molteplici textures – come i frammenti di tessuti e ricami delle Sorelle Fontana – e rievocate da cataloghi, riviste e da una fitta corrispondenza, preziosa documentazione che racconta i rapporti tra i buyer, i clienti e gli atelier, la nascita dell’ industria della moda, della sfilata quale evento di presentazione e vendita del prodotto moda (che avviene per la prima volta il 22 luglio 1952 a Firenze nella Sala Bianca di Palazzo Pitti).

Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Cocktail dress in silk twill with optical motifs, designed by teaming with Getulio Alviani, "Optical collection", Spring/Summer, 1965, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Cocktail dress in silk twill with optical motifs, designed by teaming with Getulio Alviani, “Optical collection”, Spring/Summer, 1965, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Lucio Fontana  "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli) -1968, private collection, Rome,- and Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Lucio Fontana
“Concetto Spaziale – Attese (bianco e due tagli) – 1968, private collection, Rome – and Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Valentino( silk evening pyjama, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A,) and Roberto Capucci, "Omaggio a Vasarely", sculpture-dress inspired by the artist's works with interwoven optical effect satin ribbons and ostrich feathers, 1965, Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Valentino( silk evening pyjama, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A,) and Roberto Capucci, “Omaggio a Vasarely”, sculpture-dress inspired by the artist’s works with interwoven optical effect satin ribbons and ostrich feathers, 1965, Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Un happening arricchito dalla performance dell’ artista Vanessa Beecroft, nota per le sue affiliazioni semiotiche con il mondo della moda, che ha messo in scena per l’ occasione VB74, un tableau vivant fatto di donne avvolte da veli che ritrae e indaga la femminilità, l’ essere e il suo vestimentum. Un’ idea refrigerata, scarnificata che diventa astratta e racchiude in sé quell’ accattivante estetica che ha reso famosa l’ artista. Un’ arte che rappresenta sé stessa e risponde agli interrogativi dell’ essere con il silenzio di corpo e materia, il velo, luci e ombre. Un concetto “staged” che svela in sé la sua essenza.

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Giampiero Mughini, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Giampiero Mughini, photo by N

L’ essenza dell’ inesistente, di quell’ inesistente essente che rappresenta l’ individuo visto da Carmelo Bene, che però non è osceno, fuori scena, ma è e resta in scena per tre ore, durata della performance che si è tenuta anche il 28 novembre al Maxxi in occasione della cena di gala della mostra per la raccolta fondi del MAXXI, evento in cui la moda ha generosamente sostenuto l’ arte, chiamando a sé i suoi più famosi protagonisti unitamente a una pletora di personaggi più e meno noti nelle cronache mondane che, felici e contanti, hanno contribuito al successo della serata – ampiamente raccontata dal sito web Dagospia del brillante e ironico giornalista Roberto D’ Agostino -, una raccolta fondi pari a circa 600.000 Euro (per una istituzione che – come tante altre istituzioni museali italiane – non versa in condizioni felici, soffrendo da mesi, circostanza raccontata da cronache giornalistiche, per il periodo di precarietà e incertezza in cui versa la cultura in Italia, la stessa nazione e la sua popolazione).

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Stefano Tonchi and Maria Luisa Frisa talking with a friend, photo by N

Stefano Tonchi and Maria Luisa Frisa talking with a friend, photo by N

Anche questo è un segnale positivo, che spero sia l’ inizio di un nuovo dialogo più costruttivo, profondo e solido tra le istituzioni museali e il mondo della moda che si sviluppi nel lungo periodo e costruisca nuove vie, semini idee che guardino al lungo periodo e alla cultura, come nutrimento dell’ Italia e delle sue menti, ciò che ci rende pensanti, autonomi e liberi, una forma di cibo necessaria e universale. Mi auguro anche che questo sia il primo passo per realizzare una serie di mostre in materia di moda allestite – non più sporadicamente e sperabilmente non in un’ unica, seppur ampia, sala – nei musei italiani (dicendo ciò penso alla mostra che quest’ anno ha celebrato il made in Italy a Londra, presso il Victoria & Albert Museum e penso anche alle nuove tecnologie di cui dotarsi per render ancor più esaustivo e fruibile il racconto di una mostra).

Mila Schön,  coat in plain-weave double wool with intarsia inspired by Lucio Fontana's cuts, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Giorgio Schön) and Roberto Capucci, "Omaggio a Burri", georgette coat with applied wool elements, inspired by the artist's works, 1969, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Mila Schön, coat in plain-weave double wool with intarsia inspired by Lucio Fontana’s cuts, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Giorgio Schön) and Roberto Capucci, “Omaggio a Burri”, georgette coat with applied wool elements, inspired by the artist’s works, 1969, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Coppola and Toppo, photo by N

Coppola and Toppo, photo by N

Germana Marucelli( 1962. 1967-1968, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( 1962. 1967-1968, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

 

www.fondazionemaxxi.it

Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

It was recently held at Penelope, the renowned Brescia cathedral of conceptual fashion of the one and only Roberta Valentini, a Christmas party, successful event to wish each other a happy Christmas wishes. It was celebrated the new entry, the brand Marques Almeida, as well as the heart-shaped jewelry by See me – embodying a vibrant message: a chain of love to stop the chain of violence against women. Each creation is handcrafted in Tunisia by women trained as artisans, coming for the shelter home run by the Amal Association – and a cornerstone of boutique, the brand of bags and accessories Carmina Campus promoting the culture of re-use , created by the bright fashion designer and social activist Ilaria Venturini Fendi who attended at the event. A smashing chance to enjoy signs and visions of contemporary fashion where ethics joins to aesthetic, giving rise to a new way to make fashion.

IL PARTY NATALIZIO DI PENELOPE A BRESCIA

The bags by Carmina Campus ft. in Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

The bags by Carmina Campus ft. in Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

Si è recentemente tenuto da Penelope, la rinomata cattedrale di moda concettuale di Brescia della sola e unica Roberta Valentini, un party natalizio, felice evento per scambiarsi gli auguri di Natale. Si è anche festeggiata la new entry, il brand Marques Almeida, come anche i gioielli a forma di cuore di See me – che racchiudono in sé un vibrante messaggio: una catena dell’ amore per fermare la catena di violenza contro le donne. Ogni creazione è realizzata a mano in Tunisia dalle donne avviate al lavoro di artigiano, provenienti dalla casa-rifugio gestita dall’ Associazione Amal –  e un caposaldo della boutique, il marchio di borse e accessori Carmina Campus che promuove la cultura del riuso, creato dalla brillante fashion designer e attivista del sociale Ilaria Venturini Fendi che ha presenziato all’ evento. Una formidabile occasione  per apprezzare segni e visioni di moda contemporanea in cui l’ etica si unisce all’ estetica, dando vita a un nuovo modo di fare moda.

The one and only Roberta Valentini along with Ilaria Venturini Fendi, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

The one and only Roberta Valentini along with Ilaria Venturini Fendi, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

 

The one and only Roberta Valentini at Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

The one and only Roberta Valentini at Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

 

Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

 

Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

 

Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

Penelope, photo by Alessandro Boccingher

 

The heart-shaped jewelry by See me

The heart-shaped jewelry by See me

 

The heart-shaped jewelry by See me

The heart-shaped jewelry by See me

 

 

www.penelope-store.it