You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘London’ tag.

Pam Hogg Fall/Winter 2015-2016

Pam Hogg Fall/Winter 2015-2016

Visions, fun and unusual interpretations of archetypes coming from the world of fairy tales – as the  one of Little Red Riding Hood – features in the Fall/Winter 2015-2016 collection by the brilliant British fashion designer – singer and artist –Pam Hogg. Fluid and skinny lines, visionary constructions, that are made more dramatic by using of crinoline, decorations and accessories as hats ad shoes, emphasize the silhouette and celebrate an assertive and theatrical femininity. The transparencies meet many combinations of materials as lame cloths, rubber, eco-leather, silk, tulle, velvet and leather along with many colors of the palette (including red, black, brown, pink, silver and white), paying homage to the rock glamour.

IL ROCK GLAMOUR DI PAM HOGG

Pam Hogg Fall/Winter 2015-2016

Pam Hogg Fall/Winter 2015-2016

Visioni, divertenti e insolite interpretazioni di archetipi provenienti dal mondo delle fiabe – come quella di Cappuccetto rosso – sono i protagonisti della collezione autunno/inverno 2015-2016 della brillante fashion designer – cantante e artista –Pam Hogg. Linee fluide e aderenti, visionarie costruzioni, che sono rese ancor più drammatiche dall’ uso della crinolina, decori e dagli accessori quali i cappelli e le scarpe, enfatizzano la silhouette e celebrano una femminilità assertiva e teatrale. Le trasparenze, un leitmotiv della sua opera, incontrano plurime combinazioni di materiali quali i tessuti laminati, il vinile, l’ eco-pelle, la seta, il tulle, il velluto e la pelle unitamente agli svariati colori della palette (che comprende rosso, nero, marrone, rosa, argento e bianco), rendendo omaggio al glamour rock.

Pam Hogg Fall/Winter 2015-2016

Pam Hogg Fall/Winter 2015-2016

http://pamhogg.com 

Ludique

Ludique

Intense, playful atmospheres under the sign of sensuality, eroticism and fetish suggestions give rise to a successful overlap of laces, strings and lace celebrating the female body. Assertiveness, grace and delicacy is the sign by Ludique, the brand of luxury lingerie created by the brilliant Romania fashion designer Ruxandra Gheorghe – of whose creations she made are available in the renowned London erotic emporium Coco de Mer and in other exclusive boutiques -, emphasized by unusual shapes and high-end materials.

LE INTENSE E GIOCOSE ATMOSFERE ALL’ INSEGNA DELLA SENSUALITDI LUDIQUE

Ludique

Ludique

Intense, giocose atmosfere all’ insegna della sensualità, dell’ erotismo e di suggestioni fetish danno vita a una felice sovrapposizione di lacci, stringhe e pizzo, celebrando il corpo della donna. Assertività, grazia e delicatezza è il segno di Ludique, il brand di lingerie di lusso creato dalla brillante fashion designer rumena Ruxandra Gheorghe – le cui creazioni da lei realizzate sono disponibili presso il rinomato emporio erotico di Londra Coco de Mer e in altre boutique esclusive -, enfatizzato da forme insolite e materiali di alta qualità.

Ludique

Ludique

Ludique

Ludique

Ludique

Ludique

Ludique

Ludique

Ludique

Ludique

www.ludique.ro

Justin Vivian Bond

Justin Vivian Bond

It successfully runs through 13th June 2015 in London at the Vitrine Gallery “My model/MySelf”, the solo exhibition of the iconic and eclectic artist – author, singer, visual artist and performer artist – Mx (word which means “Mix”, is an alternative to the genderized words “Mr”, “Miss”, “Mr.”, honors the trans people as well as the people who are gender fluid or rather the ones who does not wish to define by any particular gender and is officially entered into the Oxford English Dictionary, a bright result arising from the activism which has encouraged and made concrete by the artist) Justin Vivian Bond. The gallery becomes a performative exhibition space which includes a display of art – videos, performance, sculptures and watercolors -, gives rise to one installation and also presents a commercially produced, limited edition wallpapers (made in collaboration with designer George Venson). The show is focused on a collection of watercolors paintings, a series of diptychs, portrait of model Karen Graham, the testimonial of Estée Lauder Cosmetics from 1970 to 1985 along with self-portraits of Mx Bond that reflect and enhance the obsessive nature of the relationship with the model who V describes “as blank and perfect as the sphinx – only more modern and wearing lots of make-up”, which developed during V’s adolescence. A not to be missed happening to enjoy the work of a bright, vibrant individual who made his life a work of art.

MY MODEL/MYSELF, LA PERSONALE DI JUSTIN VIVIAN BOND ALLA VITRINE GALLERY DI LONDRA

Justin Vivian Bond

Justin Vivian Bond

Prosegue felicemente fino al 13 giugno 2015 a Londra presso la Vitrine Gallery “My model/MySelf”, la personale dell’ iconico ed eclettico artista – scrittore, cantante, artista e performer artist – Mx (lemma che sta a significare “Mix”, è un’ alternativa a termini genderizzati quali “Sig.ra”, “Sig.na”, “Sig.”, onora i trans come anche le persone fluide al gender o meglio coloro che non intendono essere definiti in termini di gender ed è ufficialmente entrata nell’ Oxford English Dictionary, un brillante risultato che deriva dall’ attivismo incoraggiato e concretizzato dall’ artista) Justin Vivian Bond. La galleria diventa uno spazio espositivo performativo che include una rassegna di arte – video, performance, sculture e acquerelli -, dà vita a un’ unica installazione e presenta anche una carta da parati, prodotta commercialmente in edizione limitata (realizzata in collaborazione con il designer George Venson). La mostra è incentrata su una collezione di acquerelli, una serie di dittici, i ritratti della modella Karen Graham, che è stata la testimonial di Estée Lauder Cosmetics dal 1970 al 1985 unitamente agli autoritratti di Mx Bond che riflettono ed esaltano la natura ossessiva della relazione con la modella, da lui descritta come “bianca e perfetta come la sfinge – soltanto più moderna e indossa tanto make-up”, che si è creata durante a sua adolescenza. Un evento imperdibile per apprezzare l’ opera di una brillante, vibrante individualità che ha reso la sua vita un’ opera d’ arte.

Justin Vivian Bond

Justin Vivian Bond

 

Justin Vivian Bond

Justin Vivian Bond

 

Justin Vivian Bond

Justin Vivian Bond

 

Justin Vivian Bond

Justin Vivian Bond

 

www.vitrinegallery.co.uk  

Prem Sahib during the workshop which gave rise to "I am here but you've gone", photo courtesy of Fiorucci Art Trust

Prem Sahib during the workshop which gave rise to “I am here but you’ve gone”, photo courtesy of Fiorucci Art Trust

The alchemy of scents and art shines in “I am here but you’ve gone”, the group show featuring vibrant artists as Prem Sahib, Celia Hempton, Adam Christensen, Patrizio Di Massimo, Adham Faramawy, Ed Fornieles, Mary Ramsden, Magali Reus, curated by Milovan Farronato and Stella Bottai which is held in London at the Fiorucci Art Trust – established by Nicoletta Fiorucci – and runs through 9th May 2015. The exhibition has developed in partnership with the London perfume atelier Creative perfumers and results from a 10 months research in fragrances during which the artists had access to a huge oil library in order to explore the potential of employing the scent as a medium. Here it features the scents made by the artists along with new and site-specific installations. Sensuality and eroticism, wild recall which is embodied in the work by Prem Sahib, inspired by the context of gay clubs, with fragrances that remind of sweat, chewing-gum and sex. The same realm is emphasized by Celia Hempton, bright artist well known for painting close up of her model bodies, by the “vagina perfume” she created. Intuition, sanctity are some of the suggestions turned into scented drops as the ones by Magali Reus who has developed a scent that plays on the addictive, synthetic smell of freshly-boxed product, the Adam Christensen’s creation of the “Smell of intuition” which has suffered from a consequent, perhaps inevitable, loss. Patrizio Di Massimo invented the mysterious “Odour of sanctity”, a heavenly aroma of inexplicable origin emanating from the body of the dead Saint. Adham Faramawy’s “Hyperreal flower blossom” scent is displayed in a specially crafted bottle designed with Studio_Leigh and attempts to describe a video of vocaloid pop star Hatsunè Miku dancing in a garden. Following his recent solo show titled Modern Family, Ed Fornieles has continued an investigation in everyday family tropes, while Mary Ramsden’s research has stretched to the animal realm with the scent of “Panda sex”. A not to be missed happening to get more awareness on the senses and draw attention to the importance of smell in human psychology, imagination, knowledge an behaviour.

PROFUMI & ARTE: “I AM HERE BUT YOU’ VE GONE”, LA COLLETTIVA AL FIORUCCI ART TRUST DI LONDRA

The scents explored by the artist featuring in "I am here but you've gone", photo courtesy of Fiorucci Art Trust

The scents explored by the artist featuring in “I am here but you’ve gone”, photo courtesy of Fiorucci Art Trust

L’ alchimia di profumi e arte splende in “I am here but you’ve gone”, la collettiva di cui sono protagonisti vibranti artisti quali Prem Sahib, Celia Hempton, Adam Christensen, Patrizio Di Massimo, Adham Faramawy, Ed Fornieles, Mary Ramsden, Magali Reus, curata da Milovan Farronato e Stella Bottai che si tiene a Londra presso il Fiorucci Art Trust – fondato da Nicoletta Fiorucci – e prosegue fino al 9 maggio 2015. La mostra è stata creata in partnership con l’ atelier di profumi di Londra Creative perfumers ed è il risultato di una ricerca di profumi durata 10 mesi durante la quale gli artisti hanno avuto accesso ad una enorme biblioteca di oli al fine di esplorare il potenziale uso del profumo come medium. Ivi sono esposti i profumi realizzati dagli artisti unitamente a installazioni nuove e site-specific. Sensualità ed erotismo, selvaggio richiamo che è racchiuso nell’ opera di Prem Sahib che si ispira al contesto dei locali gay con fragranze che ricordano sudore, chewing-gum e sesso. Il medesimo ambito è rimarcato da Celia Hempton, brillante artista molto nota per i dipinti con il primo piano sul corpo delle sue modelle  artist, e dal “profumo di vagina” da lei creato. Intuizione, santità sono alcune delle suggestioni trasformate in gocce di profumo come quelle di Magali Reus che realizzato un profumo che interpreta l’ odore sintetico che dà assuefazione di un prodotto appena inscatolato, la creazione di Adam Christensen del “Profumo dell’ intuizione” che ha sofferto di una consequenza, forse inevitabile, la perdita. Patrizio Di Massimo ha inventato il misterioso “Odore di santità”, un celestiale aroma di origine inspiegabile che emana dal corpo morto di un Santo. Il profumo “Bocciolo di fiore iperreale” di Adham Faramawy è presentato in una bottiglia appositamente realizzata a mano, progettata con Studio_Leigh e prova a descrivere un video della pop star vocaloid Hatsunè Miku che danza in un giardino. In seguito alla sua mostra personale dal titolo Modern Family, Ed Fornieles ha continuato un’ indagine sui tropi della quotidianità familiari, mentre la ricerca di Mary Ramsden si è rivolta all’ ambito animale con il profumo di “Sesso del panda”. Un evento imperdibile per avere una maggiore consapevolezza sui sensi e prestare attenzione all’ importanza dell’ olfatto nella psicologia dell’ uomo, nell’ immaginazione, nella conoscenza e nel comportamento.

photo courtesy of Fiorucci Art Trust

photo courtesy of Fiorucci Art Trust

 

http://fiorucciartrust.com

Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015

Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015

Flowers, lace and transparencies, feature in the Spring/Summer 2015 collection by Marchesa, brand created by Georgina Chapman and Keren Craig (celebrating its 10th birthday) which has recently presented in London at the Banqueting House during the London Fashion Week. A gipsy Woodstock spirit is impressed in the dresses, skirts and shirts, enriched by 3d floral prints and  decorations as silk fringes. Elegance, romanticism and lightness is emphasized by the palette of colors including  a vibrant shade of coral along with rose, cream, light blue, black and white.

FIORI, PIZZO & TRANSPARENZE: LO SPIRITO GIPSY DI WOODSTOCK DI MARCHESA

Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015

Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015

Fiori, pizzo e trasparenze sono protagonisti della collezione primavera/estate 2014 di Marchesa, brand creato da Georgina Chapman e Keren Craig (che celebra il suo 10° compleanno) che è stata recentemente presentata a Londra presso la Banqueting House durante la London Fashion Week. Lo spirito gipsy di Woodstock è impresso in abiti, gonne e camicie, arricchiti da stampe floreali tridimensionali e decorazioni quali le frange di seta. Eleganza, romanticismo e leggerezza enfatizzata dalla palette di colori che include un’ accesa nuance di corallo unitamente a rosa, crema, celeste, bianco e nero.

Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015

Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015

 

Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015

Marchesa Spring/Summer 2015

 

 

Lily James in Marchesa at the fashion show

Lily James in Marchesa at the fashion show

 

Olivia Palermo in Marchesa at the fashion show

Olivia Palermo in Marchesa at the fashion show

 

www.marchesa.com

Cillian Murphy, Stephen Rea

Cillian Murphy, Stephen Rea

Ballyturk” is the new play by the acclaimed Irish playwright Enda Walsh, a bitter-sweet comedy telling about the lives of two man unraveling quickly over the course of 90 minutes. Where are they, who are they, what room is this and what might be beyond the wall?. These are some of the questions embodied in this work which will be premiered on on 14th July in Galway, during the Galway International Arts Festival, featuring Cillian Murphy, Stephen Rea (both of them starred in the smashing film by Neil Jordan “Breakfast on Pluto”) and Mikel Murfi. A bright cast of artists along with a suggestive music which will be composed by the genius Teho Teardo and will be also turned into an album. Later the play will be staged from 11th September to 11th October 2014 in London at the National Theatre. A not to be missed happening to enjoy the work by vibrant artists.

“BALLYTURK”: ALCHIMIE CREATIVE IN SCENA

Cillian Murphy and Stephen Rea

Cillian Murphy and Stephen Rea

Ballyturk” è la nuova pièce teatrale dell’ acclamato commediografo irlandese Enda Walsh, una commedia agrodolce che racconta le vite di due uomini che  vanno a rotoli nel corso di 90 minuti. Dove si trovano, chi sono, quale stanza è quella e cosa potrebbe esserci oltre il muro? Questi sono alcuni egli interrogativi racchiusi in quest’ opera che sarà presentata in anteprima il 14 luglio a Galway, in occasione del Galway International Arts Festival, di cui saranno protagonisti Cillian Murphy, Stephen Rea (entrambi protagonisti della formidabile pellicola di Neil Jordan “Breakfast on Pluto”) e Mikel Murfi. Un brillante di artisti insieme alla suggestiva musica che sarà composta dal geniale Teho Teardo e sarà anche trasformata in un album. Successivamente la pièce sarà messa in scena dall’ 11 settembre all’ 11 ottobre a Londra presso il National Theatre. Un evento imperdibile per apprezzare l’ opera di vibranti artisti.

http://ballyturk.com

Kamal by Celia Hempton, photo courtesy of Galleria Lorcan O' Neill

Kamal (oil on canvas), Celia Hempton, photo courtesy of Galleria Lorcan O’ Neill

Expressionist dynamism, sensuality, eroticism along with the exploration of privacy and intimacy idea, their meaning in contemporary times connected to the redefinition of modesty, prudence and discretion shines on the canvas by Celia Hempton, who depicts landscapes, the bodies of friends and models (some of them sourced via internet and chat-rooms), focusing on their “private parts”. The young, brilliant and renowned London based artist – I was pleased to know many years ago and share with her joyful interludes – will open her first solo exhibition on 20th February 2014 in Rome at the Galleria Lorcan O’ Neill in Via Orti di Alibert and will run through 19th April 2014. A not to be missed happening to enjoy a vibrant artist.


LA PRIMA PERSONALE DI CELIA HEMPTON ALLA GALLERIA LORCAN O’ NEILL DI ROMA

Caspar, oil on canvas by Celia Hempton, photo courtesy of Galleria Lorcan O' Neill

Caspar (oil on canvas),Celia Hempton, photo courtesy of Galleria Lorcan O’ Neill

Dinamismo espressionista, sensualità, erotismo unitamente all’ esplorazione dell’ idea di privacy e intimità, il significato da loro assunto nella contemporaneità, connesso alla ridefinizione di modestia, prudenza e discrezione, splende sulle tele di Celia Hempton, la quale dipinge paesaggi, i corpi di amici e modelli (alcuni dei quali ricercati via internet e chat-rooms), concentrandosi sulle loro “parti intime”. La giovane, brillante e rinomata artista residente a Londra – mi ha rallegrato incontrare diversi anni fa e condividere con lei gioiosi intermezzi – aprirà la sua prima collettiva il 20 febbraio 2014 a Roma alla Galleria Lorcan O’ Neill in Via Orti di Alibert e proseguirà fino al 19 aprile 2014. Un evento imperdibile per apprezzare una vibrante artista.

Kajsa, oil on canvas, Celia Hempton, photo courtesy of Galleria Lorcan O' Neill

Kajsa, oil on canvas, Celia Hempton, photo courtesy of Galleria Lorcan O’ Neill

Celia Hempton, oil on canvas, photo courtesy of Galleria Lorcan O' Neill

Celia Hempton, oil on canvas, photo courtesy of Galleria Lorcan O’ Neill

Installation photo of a Wall painting, Celia Hempton, photo Installation photo of courtesy of Galleria Lorcan O' Neill

Installation photo of a Wall painting, Celia Hempton, photo Installation photo of courtesy of Galleria Lorcan O’ Neill

www.lorcanoneill.com

Isabella Blow, photo courtesy of Somerset House

Isabella Blow, photo courtesy of Somerset House

It touched me to read the piece by Andrew O’ Hagan, appeared today on T magazine, the blog by New York Times, announcing the exhibition “Isabella Bow, Fashion Galore!”, organized by the Isabella Blow Foundation in collaboration with the Central Saint Martins which will be held in London at the Somerset House from the 20th November 2013 to 2nd March 2014. The article I am glad to share with you dear FBFers features a private memory of Isabella Blow told by Jeremy Langmead along with precious remarks about the essence of eccentricity, its core, what separates style and uniqueness from fashion, what represents an icon, a dandy and distinguishes it from an aesthete, modern Des Esseintes (leading character of “Against the grain”, the novel by Joris-Karl Huysmans) with more or less successful results in terms of surface(though the surface often justifies and substitutes the lack of contents and ideas). Genuineness in the way of being, thinking, acting and doing. That is the way I remember and celebrate Isabella Blow, a real eccentric, her work, as well as the one made by others legendary eccentrics as Vivienne Westwood, Leigh Bowery, Anna Piaggi, Yves Saint Laurent and Quentin Crisp who gave us a lot in terms of emotions and ideas, ways to look at reality, to be, by considering another side, using another point of view, nullifying the clichés of conventional way of thinking.

The meaning of a true eccentric isn’t in the costume — it’s in the soul.

Jeremy Langmead tells a memorable story about Isabella Blow. “Imagine the office at News International, all the male journalists sitting around in shirt sleeves,” Langmead says. Now the editor in chief of the online men’s wear retailer Mr Porter, Langmead was the editor who hired Isabella Blow as fashion director of the Sunday Times Style Magazine in London in 1997. “In comes Isabella wearing giant mink antlers sticking out from the top of a coat. It was absolutely about who she was in her soul. At lunchtime she would sit among all the printers, eating her roast beef dressed like that, as if it was the most natural thing in the world.”

The outlandish, deeply unusual former assistant at Vogue who became mentor to a generation of fashion designers, editors and photographers, Isabella Blow is the subject of a new exhibition set amid the Neo-Classical splendor of London’s Somerset House. The surroundings are appropriate, for this is not just a show but an acknowledgement of how her sense of style opened the minds of her peers. She is hereby raised into the pantheon, lauded for the very personal vision that once disgusted the establishment.

Blow was eccentric from her top feathers to the paint that adorned her toes. I used to see her at parties sometimes, and she was a fantastically alarming person; when she smiled, throwing her head back, you saw a sneering mouth so red with lipstick that it was like an open wound. She never seemed like just another one of the fashion crowd: she was a visionary who ripened with new ideas every morning, not every season, and was a genuine muse in a world of phonies.

Leigh Bowery, photo by Nick Knight

Leigh Bowery, photo by Nick Knight

Yves Saint Laurent, photo by Richard Avedon

Yves Saint Laurent, photo by Richard Avedon

Quentin Crisp, photo courtesy of  Crisperanto: the Quentin Crisp Archives (crisperanto.org)

Quentin Crisp, photo courtesy of Crisperanto: the Quentin Crisp Archives (crisperanto.org)

True eccentrics — the Isabella Blows, the Vivienne Westwoods, the Anna Piaggis and the Stephen Tennants, as if there could ever be more than one of each — are the kind of people whose entire existence is devoted to individuality and innovation. That’s what makes a real eccentric: they really mean it, and they’re willing to suffer for it. Their social function is to explode our preconceptions about what beauty is and what good taste means. Eccentrics raise the bar on the impossible.

Yet, unfortunately, there are a few too many fake ones out there now. These are the imitators, the publicity scavengers, the ones who think it’s merely about fame or attention. They seem to be working not from a brilliant fund of ideas or from a conviction that their outer selves must be used to express a fascinating inner landscape. On the contrary, they’re just showoffs who dress up for the cameras. For people interested in our contemporary times, this is an important distinction: the true eccentric gives us more mystery, more wonder about being human, a new side to beauty, while the faux-eccentric gives us less of everything.

ECCENTRICITÀ & AUTENTICITÀ COME STILE DI VITA: ISABELLA BLOW

Isabella Blow, photo by Sean Ellis, courtesy of tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/

Isabella Blow, photo by Sean Ellis, courtesy of tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/

Mi ha emozionato leggere il pezzo di Andrew O’ Hagan, apparso oggi su T magazine, il blog del New York Times che annuncia la mostra “Isabella Bow, Fashion Galore!”, organizzata dalla Isabella Blow Foundation in collaborazione con la Central Saint Martins che si terrà a Londra presso la Somerset House dal 20 novembre 2013 al 2 marzo 2014. L’ articolo che sono lieta di condividere con voi, cari FBFers, ha quale protagonista un ricordo Isabella Blow raccontato Jeremy Langmead unitamente a preziose delucidazioni sull’ essenza dell’ eccentricità, il suo cuore, ciò che separa lo stile e l’ unicità dalla moda, ciò che rappresenta un icona, un dandy e lo distingue da un esteta, dai moderni Des Esseintes ( protagonista di “A ritroso”, il romanzo di Joris-Karl Huysmans) con più o meno felici risultati in termini di superficie (benché la superficie spesso giustifichi e sostituisca la mancanza di contenuti ed idee). Genuinità nell’ essere, pensare, agire e fare. Così mi piace ricordare e celebrare Isabella Blow, una vera eccentrica, il suo lavoro e quello di altri leggendari eccentrici quali Vivienne Westwood, Leigh Bowery, Anna Piaggi, Yves Saint Laurent e Quentin Crisp che ci hanno dato tanto in termini di emozione ed idee, modi di guardare la realtà, di essere, considerando un’ altra dimensione, avvalendosi di un altro punto di vista, vanificando i clichés del pensiero convenzionale.

Il significato di un vero eccentrico non si trova nell’ abito – è nell’ anima.

Jeremy Langmead racconta una memorabile storia su Isabella Blow. “Immagina l’ufficio di News International, tutti i giornalisti uomini che bighellonano in camicia,” Langmead racconta. Adesso l’ editor in chief del rivenditore di abbigliamento uomo Mr Porter, Langmead era l’ editore che ha assunto Isabella Blow come fashion director del Sunday Times Style Magazine a Londra nel 1997. “Entra Isabella che indossa  gigantesche corna di visone che spuntano fuori dalla parte superiore di un cappotto. Assolutamente era tutta una questione di chi ella fosse nella sua anima. All’ ora di pranzo stava seduta in mezzo a tutti i tipografi, a mangiare il suo roast beef condito in quel modo, come se fosse la cosa più naturale al mondo.”

La stravagante, profondamente fuori dal comune ex assistente di Vogue che è diventata il mentore di una generazione di fashion designers, editori e fotografi, Isabella Blow è il soggetto di una nuova mostra allestita tra lo splendore neoclassico della Somerset House di Londra. Gli ambienti sono appropriati, per ciò che non è soltanto una mostra, ma un riconoscimento di come il suo senso di stile abbia aperto le menti dei suoi pari. È con questo elevata all’ interno del pantheon, lodata per la sua personale visione che una volta disgustava l’ establishment.

La Blow era una eccentrica dalla cima delle sue piume al colore che adornava le dita dei piedi.  Ero solito incontrarla alle feste qualche volta ed era una persona fantasticamente allarmante, quando sorrideva, sbattendo indietro la testa, vedevi una bocca beffarda talmente rossa di rossetto che sembrava una ferita aperta. Non era mai simile a nessun altro della gente della moda: era una visionaria che maturava nuove idee ogni giorno, non ogni stagione, ed era una musa vera in un mondo di falsi.

Vivienne Westwood, photo courtesy viviennewestwood.co.uk

Vivienne Westwood, photo courtesy viviennewestwood.co.uk

Anna Piaggi, photo by N

Anna Piaggi, photo by N

I veri eccentrici — le Isabella Blow, le Vivienne Westwood, le Anna Piaggi e gli Stephen Tennant, come se ci potesse mai essere più di uno di loro – sono il tipo di persone la cui intera esistenza è dedicata all’ individualità e all’ innovazione. Questo è ciò che rende tale un vero eccentrico: essi intendono davvero ciò e sono disposti a soffrire per questo. La loro funzione sociale è distruggere i nostri preconcetti su ciò che la bellezza sia e su ciò che si intenda per buon gusto. Gli eccentrici alzano il tiro sull’ impossibile.

Finora, sfortunatamente, ce ne è qualcuno, troppi i finti che sono adesso là fuori. Questi sono gli imitatori, i predatori di pubblicità, quelli che pensano che sia meramente una questione di fama o attenzione. Sembrano intenti a operare non partendo da un brillante deposito di idee o dalla convinzione che la loro esteriorità debba essere usata per esprimere un affascinante panorama interiore. Al contrario sono soltanto gente che si esibisce, si veste per esporsi dinanzi ai flash delle macchine fotografiche. Per la gente interessata alla nostra contemporaneità, questo è un importante tratto distintivo: il vero eccentrico ci regala più mistero, più meraviglia riguardo all’ essere umano, una nuova dimensione di bellezza, mentre i finti eccentrici ci regalano meno di tutto.”

http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com

http://www.somersethouse.org.uk

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

The brilliant milliner Shilpa Chavan, creator of brand Little Shilpa, who recently featured in London in the Fashion Scout, event which was held at the Freemasons’ Hall during the London Fashion Week and soon will feature along with other smashing creatives in the event “Creativity from FBF to White” – which will be held from 21st to 23rd September 2013 in Milan at the White Suite – to present “Grey matter”, the Spring/Summer 2014 collection she made, inspired by the suggestions coming from its native city, Bombay along with the interpretation of traditional sari. The suggestive accessories she created embody a bright combination of materials as Perspex, tulle, silk, lace and even fabrics from brocade saris, evidence the successful use of a conceptual approach which connects Western and Eastern imagery and gives rise to an unique aesthetics and enchanting accessories under the sign of a flamboyant charm.

IL FASCINO FLAMBOYANT DI LITTLE SHILPA 

Little Shilpa

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

La brillante designer di cappelli Shilpa Chavan, creatrice del brand Little Shilpa, che è stata recentemente protagonista a Londra del Fashion Scout, evento che si è tenuto alla Freemasons Hall durante la London Fashion Week e presto sarà protagonista unitamente ad altri formidabili creativi dell’ evento “Creativity from FBF to White” – che si terrà dal 21 al 23 settembre 2013 a Milano presso la White Suite – per presentare “Grey matter”, la collezione primavera/estate 2014 da lei realizzata che si ispira alle suggestioni provenienti dalla sua città natia, Bombay e reinterpreta il tradizionale sari. I suggestivi accessori da lei creati racchiudono una brillante combinazioni di materiali quali perspex, tulle, seta, pizzo e anche tessuti dei sari di broccato, evidenziano felicemente un approccio concettuale che unisce l’ immaginario occidentale e quello orientale e dà vita a una estetica unica ed incantevoli creazioni all’ insegna di un fascino flamboyant.

Little Shilpa

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

Little Shilpa

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

Little Shilpa

Little Shilpa

Little Shilpa

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

Little Shilpa

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Emmanuel Balayer

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Ashley Simmons

Little Shilpa, photo courtesy of Ashley Simmons

www.littleshilpa.com

 

Marko Matisyk, photo by Philip Suddick

Marko Matisyk, photo by Philip Suddick

Emotions, a powerful creative energy, humility, genius, modesty and positivity, a generous and bright personality shines in Marko Matysik, special individual and smashing eclectic creative with whom I was pleased of talking about, amazed and happy of sharing ideas about fashion, creativity and contemporary times. To talk about Marko and introducing him and the works he make properly it’s not so easy, being Marko a volcano of creativity, arisen since his childhood – age when he passed the time making paper princesses as gift to his mother’s friends, spent travelling around the world with his Anglo-German hotelier parents and absorbing the minutiae of jet-set life. Later he graduated with honors at the London St. Martin’s school of Art and started dressing princesses, working at the Victor Edelstein atelier ( the preferred couturier of Diana, the Princess of Wales). Then he established his own label “Marko Matysik” in 1995, working in Paris and London in the realm which is his passion, the couture and continuing  working for many private haute couture clients internationally under this label – including the making wedding dress for Tamara Beckwith and an accessories collection presented every season in Paris at Colette, belts being something which goes beyond belts, about whose I recently talked, created by joining antique ribbons, fabrics and buckles from the 15th to 18th century, giving rise to luxury creations collected by personas as Madonna, Donatella Versace, Karl Lagerfeld and Daphne Guinness.

Marko Matysik and the reportage he made featuring in Vogue China October 2005 issue

Marko Matysik and the reportage he made featuring in Vogue China October 2005 issue

Luxury, a luxury idea which is quite far away from the idea of luxury embodied in most of luxury brands’ commercials and in their logos impressed on the items they made, it’s the genuine idea of luxury which is the one developed through his work, connected to the idea of uniqueness, timeless elegance and style, embodies a refined craftsmanship and precious materials and successfully makes concrete creativity under the sign of its free expression and experimentation. In fact art is the main feature of Marko’s creative process in the realm of fashion as well as in other realms connected to that he explores as fashion consulting (for companies as Belmacz, Boudicca, Krizia, and also as creative director for Marie-Helen de Taillac) styling, fashion illustration, and fashion journalism (as editor in chief for Big Show, contributing fashion editor for World of Interiors, Drama and Vogue worldwide magazine, including a monthly page in Vogue Japan and Vogue China) by using of an emotional approach and care for detail. That is the exploration of the same field, the haute couture and luxury by using another medium and holding the same artistic approach.

Marko Matysik and the illustrations he made featuring in Vogue China April 2006 issue

Marko Matysik and the illustrations he made featuring in Vogue China April 2006 issue

That is what shines in the series of painting he made, works commissioned by Vogue China, turned into illustrations featuring along with photographs and interviews he made in an editorial on couture fashion week, genuine artworks that were exhibited by the London Fashion Illustration Gallery,  an agency owned by William Lyng ( Marko’s agent) at the London Mayor Gallery (in 22A Cork Street). A smashing creative energy and the beauty of an precious individual who celebrates and successfully makes concrete fashion and elegance as an artwork it is what is embodied in the following interview, arisen from a marvelous conversation with Marko Matysik where he generously talked about himself, telling about the core of is work, its creative path and forthcoming projects.

Christian Lacroix seen by Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

How did you start working in the realm of fashion?

“Since I was a child, at age of 4 I was obsessed with princesses since I was a child, at age of 4, I designed dresses having bows, I loved everything which shined. One day a friend of my mother who saw my sketches told me: “you will become and you will make my dresses”, but I still wasn’t conscious of that, of what I would wanted to do when I would has been older. I was fascinated by suggestions, colors when I go out, walking on the street, I looked at the shops windows and I set up a shop window for a boutique at the age of 11-12, a fantastic experience I continued doing for two years. Later, I showed at the age of 13 my sketch book to Manfred Schneider, a very famous couturier in Munich, I landed my first job as design assistant and I became a luxury addict. Then I studied at the London St. Martin’s School of Art and after I graduated I started working for Victor Edelstein and later I created my own brand.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Beyond that I started working in the realm of fashion journalism and illustration. That has happened for random. Since I ended the St. Martin’s, a friend of mine I saw during a party, a fashion journalist told me he had to cover fashion week, go to the fashion shows, make a reportage and he didn’t feel like doing that, therefore I told him: don’t worry, if you want I can do that. Thus all that started. Having already my clients I felt myself like outside reality, therefore that has been a successful chance for me to enter into the reality. Resulting also from that I made illustrations for Vogue”.

Marko Matysik on Vogue China

Marko Matysik on Vogue China

What is the leitmotiv – if there is a leitmotiv or rather an element – joining your different creative expression you make concrete as illustrator, fashion writer and fashion designer?

“It’s the creativity, the freedom of experiment creativity without limits. That is one of the reasons for which I love the realm of haute couture. Here I am not responsible for a huge office, a huge staff, I don’t deal with a big pr office, I have less limits in terms of creativity and designing. Nevertheless I never desired getting a huge studio, I prefer being selfish in this sense and standing alone, the collaboration is important, but I prefer – it’s a privilege – working by myself, as I don’t want being responsible to manage a big team. Thus it has also happened with the work which has commissioned to me by Vogue China concerning the haute couture fashion week. It has been a privilege for me after the hectic rhythm of haute couture fashion week and its magic working for a month on the paintings and spending my time at the Nicholas Bernstein’s studio – placed in the area of Hammersmith – with whom I collaborated where he would painted then I would painted on top or viceversa. He – who hasn’t a classical background –  inspired very much my work which has been something spiritual, to paint has been a kind of escapism, having spent one month alone painting, a medium which is more different than drawing. To use oil on canvas, instead of drawing, also reaches the spread of color in the studio where you work, as the Nicholas’ studio which is full of color spread in the room. Anyway to paint has emphasized the magic atmosphere of haute couture fashion show I had the privilege of seeing. An escapism which make you feel safe. There is a big magic and creativity in the dream-provoking couture and also in its backstage. In fact the backstage is what I cover in my reportages, as I like to look at a garment, touch it, feel how it’s a dress, the movement it makes and it is a magic and the sound a fabric makes as the paper taffeta is an emotion. I consider myself as a privileged one, having the chance of seeing periodically my little fashion family and being able of enjoying all that.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Coming back to the theme of fashion, I am focused on the field of couture and luxury, as this realm has many potentialities in the free creative expression and experimentation, instead the ready-to-wear reaches more compromises in order to create something which pleases to more people. And it’s a big pressure for me having more people to satisfy, I have my commissions that make all that more spontaneous, fun and free, having just only two or three women on mind, one client to satisfy who is happy for what I make and makes me happy for what I make.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Concerning my collection of belts – as the silver chatelaine, which is available at giftlab.com -, it has arisen spontaneously, it is also connected to something emotional, though is the result of a detailed search for textiles, materials and ancient and contemporary decorating elements in the realm of belts. It’s an emotional experiences as it arises from going out and visiting Carol Graves Johnson, specialized in belts and owner of company Cingular, going to her house which is on the other bank of Thames. That is connected to something emotional, the joy which arises from seeing Carol and working together on the belts.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Considering the leitmotiv of my work and its designing process, the main purpose is to give a deep, meaningful dimension, something having a soul, it’s not only about to give something which is new, it’ s all about that, it’s about many global influences and it’s about it’s all about being part of this mélange of periods of times and of details. I am incredibly curious, I research on the background of my project to get the happier result. I am more connected to the art environment and I think the most enjoyable thing is to inspire others. Instead thinking about what I create the leitmotiv is being feel appeal considered I tend to specialize in items for people that already have everything”.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

What are the forthcoming projects you are working on?

“I am art directing a video, styling two shoots, making an Haute Couture soft trouser suit with coat and blouse and starting up super chic accessories collection (gloves, hats and other items) created by upcycling and I am making the monthly diary page for Vogue Japan”.

ARTE, MODA, CREATIVITÀ & SARTORIALITÀ: IL RACCONTO EMOZIONALE DI MARKO MATYSIK

Marko Matysik, photo by Philip Suddick

Marko Matysik, photo by Philip Suddick

Emozioni, passione, una ponderosa energia creativa, umiltà, genialità, modestia e positività, una generosa e brillante personalità splende in Marko Matysik, speciale individualità e formidabile, eclettico creativo con cui sono stata lieta di parlare, piacevolmente sorpresa e felice di condividere idee in tema di moda, creatività e contemporaneità. Parlare di Marko e presentare lui ed il suoi lavori in modo appropriato non è facile, essendo Marko un vulcano di creatività, nata sin dall’ infanzia, epoca in cui passava il tempo a fare principesse di carta da regalare alle amiche della madre, trascorsa viaggiando per il mondo con i suoi genitori, albergatori anglo-americani e assorbendo le minuzie della vita del jet-set. Successivamente si è diplomato con lode presso la St. Martin’s school of Art di Londra ed ha cominciato a vestire le principesse, lavorando all’ atelier Victor Edelstein (il couturier preferito di Diana, la Princesss del Galles). Ha poi creato il proprio marchio “Marko Matysik” nel 1995, lavorando a Parigi e Londra nell’ ambito che è la sua passione, l’ alta moda e continuando a lavorare internazionalmente con la sua etichetta per plurimi clienti privati di altamoda – che include la realizzazione dell’ abito da sposa per Tamara Beckwith and una collezione di accessori presentata ogni stagione a Parigi da Colette, cinture che sono qualcosa che va oltre le cinture, di cui ho recentemente parlato, create unendo nastri antichi, tessuti e fibbie dal 15° al 18° secolo, dando vita a creazioni di lusso, collezionate da personaggi quali Madonna, Donatella Versace, Karl Lagerfeld e Daphne Guinness.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Il lusso, un idea di lusso che è ben lungi dall’ idea di lusso racchiusa nelle pubblicità dei brand di lusso e nei loro loghi impressi nei capi da loro realizzati, è l’ autentica idea del lusso che è quella consolidata attraverso la sua opera, connessa all’ idea di unicità, eleganza e stile senza tempo, racchiude in sé una raffinata artigianalità e preziosi materiali e concretizza felicemente la creatività all’ insegna di una libera espressione e sperimentazione. Infatti l’ arte è il tratto principale dell’ processo creativo di Marko nell’ ambito della moda come anche in altri ambiti ad essa connessi che esplora nelle vesti di consulente di moda (per aziende quali Belmacz, Boudicca, Krizia ed anche nelle vesti di direttore creativo per Marie-Helen de Taillac) styling, illustrazione e giornalismo di moda (quale direttore editoriale di Big Show, contributing fashion editor per World of Interiors, Drama ed i Vogue magazines di tutto il mondo, che comprende una pagina mensile su Vogue Japan e Vogue China) avvalendosi di un approccio emozionale e della cura per il dettaglio. È l’ esplorazione del medesimo ambito, l’ alta moda e il lusso mediante l’ uso di un altro mezzo di comunicazione e conservando il medesimo approccio artistico.

Marko Matysik on Vogue China

Marko Matysik on Vogue China

Ciò è quel che splende bella serie di dipinti da lui realizzati, lavori commissionati da Vogue China, trasformati in illustrazioni che sono protagoniste unitamente a fotografie ed interviste da lui realizzate di un editoriale sulla settimana dell’ alta moda, autentiche opere d’ arte che sono state esposte dalla Fashion Illustration Gallery di Londra , agenzia di proprietà di William Lyng ( l’ agente di Marko) resso la Mayor Gallery (in 22A Cork Street) di Londra. Una formidabile energia creativa e la bellezza di una preziosa individualità che celebra e concretizza felicemente la moda ed eleganza quale opera d’ arte è quel che è racchiuso nella intervista che segue, nata da una meravigliosa conversazione con Marko Matysik in cui si è generosamente raccontato, parlando del nucleo centrale della sua opera, del suo iter creativo e dei progetti futuri.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Come hai iniziato a lavorare nell’ ambito della moda?

“Da bambino, all’ età di quattro anni ero ossessionato dalle principesse, disegnavo vestiti con i fiocchi, amavo tutto ciò che brillava. Un giorno un’ amica di mia madre che ha visto i miei disegni mi ha detto: “diventerai couturier e mi farai i vestiti”, ancora però non ero consapevole di ciò che avrei voluto fare da grande. Ero affascinato dalle suggestioni, dai colori, quando uscivo per strada osservavo le vetrine dei negozi e all’ età di undici-dodici anni ho allestito una vetrina per una boutique, una esperienza fantastica che ho fatto per circa due anni. In seguito all’ età di tredici anni ho mostrato il mio libro di schizzi a Manfred Schneider, un couturier molto famoso a Monaco, ho avuto il mio primo lavoro avuto il mio primo lavoro nelle vesti di design assistant e sono divenuto un patito del lusso. Ho poi studiato alla St. Martin’s School of Art di Londra e non appena mi sono diplomato ho iniziato a lavorare per Victor Edelstein e ho creato il mio brand.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Oltre a ciò ho iniziato a lavorare nell’ ambito del giornalismo di moda e nell’ illustrazione. Ciò è avvenuto casualmente. Una volta conclusa la St. Martin’s un mio amico incontrato in occasione di un party, un giornalista di moda, mi diceva che doveva effettuare un reportage della fashion week, andare alle sfilate, fare un reportage e non ne aveva per nulla voglia, sicché gli ho detto: non preoccuparti se vuoi potrei farlo io. Così è cominciato tutto ciò”. Avendo già i miei clienti mi sentivo avulso dalla realtà, pertanto questa per me è stata una felice occasione per entrare nella realtà. Anche in ragione di ciò ho realizzato le illustrazioni per Vogue”.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Qual è il leitmotiv – se esiste un leitmotiv o meglio un elemento – che accomuna la tua diversa espressione creativa che concretizzi nelle vesti di illustratore, giornalista di moda e fashion designer?

“E’ la creatività, la libertà di sperimentare la creatività senza limiti. Questa è una delle ragioni per cui amo l’ ambito dell’ alta moda. Ivi non sono responsabile di un grande ufficio, un grande staff, non ho a che fare con un grande ufficio di pubbliche relazioni, ho meno limitazioni in termini di creatività e progettazione. Peraltro non ho mai desiderato disporre di un ampio studio, preferisco essere egoista in questo senso e bastare a me stesso, la collaborazione è importante, ma preferisco – è un privilegio – operare da solo non volendo essere responsabile di gestire un grande team. Così è accaduto anche con il lavoro a me commissionato da Vogue China inerente la settimana dell’ alta moda. Dopo il ritmo frenetico della settimana dell’ alta moda e la sua magia è stato un privilegio per me, lavorare per un mese ai dipinti e passare il mio tempo presso lo studio – ubicato nei dintorni di Hammersmith – dell’ artista Nicholas Bernstein con cui ho collaborato precedentemente dipingendo prima l’ uno e poi l’ altro a vicenda. Costui – che non ha un background classico – ha ispirato molto il mio lavoro che è stato qualcosa di spirituale, dipinge è stato una sorta di escapismo, avendo passato un mese da solo a dipingere, una modalità ben diversa dal disegnare. Usare l’ olio su tela, diversamente dal disegno, implica la dispersione del colore anche nello studio in cui lavori, come lo studio di Nicholas, pieno di colore sparso per gli ambienti. Peraltro dipingere ha enfatizzato la magica atmosfera delle sfilate di alta moda che ho avuto il privilegio di vedere. Un escapismo che fa sentire al sicuro. C’è grande magia e creatività nella couture che provoca il sogno e anche nel suo backstage. Infatti il backstage è l’ ambito che documento nei miei reportage, poiché mi piace vedere un capo, toccarlo, sentire come è un abito, il movimento che esso fa ed è di per sé una magia ed il il suono che fa un tessuto quale il taffetà ad effetto carta è un emozione. Mi considero un privilegiato, avendo la possibilità di incontrare la mia piccola famiglia della moda periodicamente e potere apprezzare tutto ciò.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Tornando alla moda, sono concentrato sul settore della couture e del lusso, poiché questo ambito ha maggiori potenzialità di libera espressione creativa e sperimentazione, mentre con il pret â porter si devono fare maggiori compromessi al fine di creare qualcosa che piaccia a più persone. E per me è una grande pressione avere più persone da soddisfare, ho le mie commissioni che rendono tutto ciò più spontaneo divertente e libero, avendo soltanto due, tre donne in testa, una cliente da soddisfare che è felice di ciò che faccio e rende felice me per ciò che faccio.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Riguardo alla mia collezione di cinture  – quali la silver chatelaine che è disponibile su giftlab.com – è nata spontaneamente, anche essa è legata a qualcosa di emozionale, pur essendo frutto di una ricerca dettagliata di tessuti, materiali ed elementi di decoro antichi e recenti in materia di cinture. È un esperienza emozionale, poiché nasce dall’ uscire e far visita a Carol Graves Johnson, specialista di cinture e proprietaria dell’ azienda Cingular, andando a casa sua che si trova dall’ altra parte della riva del Tamigi. Ciò è connesso a qualcosa di emozionale, alla gioia di vedere Carol e insieme lavorare alle cinture.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Considerando il leitmotiv del mio lavoro e la sua progettazione, la principale finalità è offrire una dimensione profonda, densa di significato, qualcosa che abbia un anima, non è soltanto offrire qualcosa che sia nuovo, è ciò su cui esso verte, è una questione di molteplici influenze globali e dell’ essere parte di questo mélange di epoche e di dettagli. Sono incredibilmente curioso, faccio ricerche considerando il background del mio progetto al fine di ottenere il risultato più felice. Sono più connesso all’ ambiente dell’ arte e ritengo che la cosa più gradevole sia ispirare gli altri. Pensando invece ciò che creo il leitmotiv sono l’ essere sostenibile, la sensazione di appeal, considerando che tendo a specializzarmi in oggetti per gente che ha già tutto”.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Quali sono i progetti futuri a cui stai lavorando?

“Sto curando la direzione artistica di un video, lo styling per due servizi fotografici, realizzando un completo di alta moda composto di morbidi pantaloni, cappotto e camicia e avviando una collezione super chic di accessori creati mediante surciclo (guanti, cappelli e altro) e lavorando alla mie cronache sulla pagina mensile di Vogue Japan“.

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik

Marko Matysik on Drama, photo by Ram Shergill

Marko Matysik on Drama, photo by Ram Shergill

Marko Matysik on Drama, photo by Ram Shergill

Marko Matysik on Drama, photo by Ram Shergill

Marko Matysik

the silver chatelaine by Marko Matysik, available at Giftlab.com