You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Nietzsche’ tag.

Edoardo Quarantelli introducing Francesco Roat at the Rome Aseq bookshop, photo by N

Edoardo Quarantelli introducing Francesco Roat at the Rome Aseq bookshop, photo by N

Desire, word defining – as it is evidences the Treccani Italian dictionary – “the intense feeling which pushes to look for the fulfillment of all that can satisfy a physical and spiritual need”, as well as the one of “lack of a thing being necessary to one’s own physical and spiritual interest”. It’s interesting to think about the etymology of this word which, considering the Etymological Dictionary of Italian Language (DELI) stands, as “to stop contemplating the stars for an augural purpose”. That, as the philosopher Umberto Galimberti says, refers to the “De Bello Gallico” by Gaius Iulius Caesar: the desiderantes (or the ones who desired) were the soldiers who were under the stars to wait for the ones who still didn’t come back after they fought during the day. It arises from that the meaning of the verb to desire: to stand under the star and wait. This meaning refers to an idea of communion of the man with universe, a dimension ruled by natural laws (also reminding me the quote by Immanuel Kant: “the starry sky above me and the moral law within me”) and at first seems it is not pertaining to the geographies of desire, its contorted paths, atavistic theme which is the quintessence of human condition, draws the ontology of individual and is bringer of many inputs and suggestions connected to contemporary times, phenomenon as the mass narcissism and hyper-hedonism of society, promoted and emphasized by the mainstream culture. It almost sounds like a hiatus, but it is not like that, considering these words are said by someone – the one who writes – who often spends a lot of them to draw the contemporary creativity – oriented to the kalokagathia, or to celebrate the beautiful and the good – embodied in fashion and its product, which doesn’t exist, gets any success if it isn’t sold. And this moment, the moment of sale is strictly linked to another moment, the presentation and communication of fashion, its product, which has the purpose to create an emotion, to light a fire, desire, rush to enter and belong to the universe depicted by that product and its consumption (in fact it often talks about the lifestyle products or those products drawing a certain lifestyle) These mainly sociological suggestions are the contextualization into a narrower and more specific theme or fashion, source of culture and commodities category, of a wider subject, brightly told by author and literary critic Francesco Roat in the book he wrote “Desiderare invano. Il mito di Faust in Goethe e altrove”( “To desire in vain. The mith of Faust in Goethe and elsewhere”, Moretti & Vitali, Euros 14,00) which has recently launched in Rome at the Aseq bookshop, (wonderful place to discover, where to stay and come back, of whose soul is tangible, a genuine cathedral of knowledge, created about forty years ago by Edoardo Quarantelli and Luca Nerazzini).

 “Desiderare invano. Il mito di Faust in Goethe e altrove”( “To desire in vain. The mith of Faust in Goethe and elsewhere”) by Francesco Roat, photo by N

“Desiderare invano. Il mito di Faust in Goethe e altrove”( “To desire in vain. The mith of Faust in Goethe and elsewhere”) by Francesco Roat, photo by N

I was pleased during this circumstance of meeting and facing before and during the event with the author of this book. Francesco was very generous with me and the audience which was at the book launch, of whose title refers to the legendary doctor Faust, the man, doctor and necromancer who lived in the late Middle Age and sold his soul to the devil to get in exchange for supernatural powers, being the personification of the excess of desire. I like reminding the play by Marlowe “The tragical history of Doctor Faustus”, though the literary revisitations of the persona are many, the one by Goethe is the most touching and human, a masterpiece of Romantic literature. A myth, the one of Faust, – as Burckhardt asserted -, “a primordial image into whose every human being can/must catch its own essence and destiny”. André Neher thinks this image represents the myth of modern man as well as Aldo Carotenuto, one of the most relevant persona of the Junghism, is oriented in the same sense, thinking it needs “consider Faust as a mythical image of collective unconscious which will embody time to time in the structure of contemporary man, having his features, absorbing his dramas and fears, thus turning into the most amazing archetype of modernity”. A man who wants having all and is punished because he wanted having all. This seems like the big drama of Faust, but it’s not like that. The myth depicts the human desire of totality, emancipating, as Roat clarifies in a clear, persuasive and intelligible way, “from divine/dogmatic rules, the urge of knowing/exploring reality in its deep cockles of the heart, being free from any ethical/religious boundaries, then the self-righteousness of tending in an overwhelming/obsessive way to go beyond any human limit” ( idea recalling the Übermensch, Superman by Nietzsche, enlivened by the will to power). Faust is also “the non-conformist who wants savoring any delight, satisfying any instinct or longing”. That – the author says – “represents an useful reading key of the post-late modern Western man who, is willing to the disenchantment and is disappointed by any ideological credo, seems more wrapped in his closing which is under the sign of a narcissism, tending to the reification of the other from self and is involved in an eternal desiring tension/fibrillation”, if he doesn’t falls in the depressive stasis, a tedium vitae (boredom of life) which lacks passions or worst a deadly nihilism of an individual who is disaffected, slothful and indifferent to the “you” and God, as well as to his own ego”.

A memory from over a decades ago, me, myself and I in Staufen (the town of Frederick II), at the roadhouse where the legend tells Faust sold his soul to Mephistopheles, photo by Diana Illing

A memory from over a decade ago, me, myself and I in Staufen (the town of Frederick II), at the  roadhouse where the legend tells Faust sold his soul to Mephistopheles, photo by Diana Illing

Youth, love, money, power are the gifts given by Mephistopheles to Faust, desires that also enliven the contemporary times, one of all, the desire of extending one’s own life, because the drama of individual, as the writer asserts, arises from the finitude of human condition, the consciousness of having a start and an end or to die, instead of the animals that aren’t conscious of their own death, but they are just only conscious of the other animals’ death. Instead that, it’s a fact, a reality before or after we face with that or rather with the death, should be a mere invite to live joyfully, reconciled with our soul and the world surrounding us during this short life, without repressing or annihilating the desire, being a human quality and propulsive motion of life and its dynamism, connecting it to the principle of reality, freeing it from the illusions or the desiring in vain – with the surrenders which it implies behind the principle of pleasure – where sensitivity and reason is one next to the other and invites the individual to its crossing”. “To contemplate the sky and the order of universe – and tend at the same time to elevate ourselves for the time we have – means to make ours a vision of life which pays less attention to the death as law of the life, means to become conscious of the impossibility of any absolute, eternal delight. It means to endorse the light and dark contrasts of a lasting shadiness”. This is the core, the invite and lesson arising from the reading of this book – precious pearl of wisdom to think about and rethink about oneself – and the myth of Faust who is not punished by God, who distances at the moment of death his soul from Mephistopheles and makes him ascend in the sky, because “errs the man until he looks for”, thus God asserted in the Prologue in the sky included in the beginning of Faust. Therefore God is indulgent towards who – like Faust – “made the overwhelming and never satisfied rush towards the fullness of life, absolute, knowledge or the otherness/ulteriority going beyond all that is ordinary, finished and known, his own reason to live.

 

LE GEOGRAFIE DEL DESIDERIO: LA PRESENTAZIONE DI “DESIDERARE INVANO. IL MITO DI FAUST IN GOETHE E ALTROVE” DI FRANCESCO ROAT ALLA LIBRERIA ASEQ DI ROMA

Edoardo Quarantelli and Francesco Roat at the Rome Aseq bookshop, photo by N

Edoardo Quarantelli and Francesco Roat at the Rome Aseq bookshop, photo by N

Il desiderio, lemma che definisce – come evidenzia il dizionario della lingua italiana Treccani – l’ “intenso sentimento che spinge a cercare l’ attuazione di quanto possa appagare un bisogno fisico e spirituale”, come anche quello della “mancanza di cosa necessaria al proprio interesse fisico e spirituale”. È interessante riflettere sull’ etimologia di questa parola che per il Dizionario Etimologico della Lingua Italiana (DELI) equivale a “cessare di contemplare le stelle a scopo augurale”. Ciò, come afferma il filosofo Umberto Galimberti, rimanda al “De Bello Gallico” di Caio Giulio Cesare: i desiderantes (ovvero coloro che desideravano) erano i soldati che stavano sotto le stelle ad aspettare quelli che dopo aver combattuto durante il giorno non erano ancora tornati. Da qui deriva il significato del verbo desiderare: stare sotto le stelle ed attendere. Tale significato fa riferimento a un concetto di comunione dell’ uomo con l’ universo, a una dimensione regolata da leggi di natura (mi richiama alla mente anche l’ aforisma di Immanuel Kant: “il cielo stellato sopra di me, la legge morale dentro me”) e sembra prima facie non essere del tutto pertinente con le geografie del desiderio, le sue tortuose vie, tema atavico che è la quintessenza della condizione umana, disegna l’ ontologia dell’ individuo ed è foriero di plurimi spunti e riflessioni connesse alla contemporaneità, a fenomeni quali il narcisismo di massa e l’ iperedonismo della società, promosso ed enfatizzato dalla cultura di mainstream. Sembra quasi uno iato e non lo è, che queste parole provengano da chi – colei che scrive – sovente ne spende tante per disegnare la creatività contemporanea – orientata alla kalokagathia, ovvero a celebrare il bello e il buono -, racchiusa nella moda e nel suo prodotto, che non esiste, non riscuote alcun consenso ove non sia venduto. E questo momento, quello della vendita è strettamente legato a un altro momento, quello della presentazione e comunicazione della moda, del suo prodotto, finalizzato a creare un’ emozione, accendere un fuoco, desiderio, moto, per entrare e appartenere all’ universo dipinto da quel prodotto e dal suo consumo (spesso si parla infatti di prodotti di lifestyle ovvero quei prodotti che disegnano un determinato stile di vita). Queste suggestioni eminentemente sociologiche, sono la contestualizzazione in un tema più ristretto e specifico ovvero la moda, fonte di cultura e categoria merceologica, di un discorso molto più ampio, brillantemente affrontato dallo scrittore e critico letterario Francesco Roat nel suo libro “Desiderare invano. Il mito di Faust in Goethe e altrove”(Moretti & Vitali, Euro 14,00) che è stato recentemente presentato a Roma presso la libreria Aseq, (luogo meraviglioso da scoprire, in cui sostare e tornare, la cui anima è tangibile, un’ autentica cattedrale del sapere creata circa quaranta anni fa da Edoardo Quarantelli e Luca Nerazzini).

The Staufen roadhouse where the legend tells Faust sold his soul to Mephistopheles, into that room which is now wrapped by the leaves of a tree, photo by N

The Staufen roadhouse where the legend tells Faust sold his soul to Mephistopheles, into that room (n. 5) which is now wrapped by the leaves of a tree, photo by N

In questa occasione mi ha rallegrato incontrare e confrontarmi prima e durante l’ evento con l’ autore di questo libro. Francesco è stato molto generoso con me e con il pubblico che ha presenziato alla presentazione del libro, il cui titolo rimanda al leggendario dottor Faust, l’ uomo, medico e negromante che è vissuto nel tardo Medioevo e ha venduto la sua anima al diavolo in cambio di poteri soprannaturali, personificazione dell’ eccesso del desiderio. Mi piace ricordare il dramma di Marlowe “La storia tragica del dottor Faust” (“The tragical history of Doctor Faustus”), pur essendo plurime le rivisitazioni letterarie del personaggio, quella di Goethe resta però la più struggente e umana, un capolavoro della letteratura romantica. Un mito, quello di Faust, – come affermava Burckhardt -, “un’ immagine primordiale nella quale ogni essere umano può/deve saper cogliere la sua essenza e il suo destino”. Secondo André Neher tale immagine rappresenta il mito dell’ uomo moderno e anche Aldo Carotenuto, uno dei personaggi più rappresentativi dello junghismo, si orienta nel medesimo senso, ritenendo che sia opportuno “considerare quella di Faust come un’ immagine mitica dell’ inconscio collettivo che si incarnerà, di volta in volta nella struttura dell’ uomo contemporaneo, assumendone le sembianze, assorbendone i drammi e le inquietudini, trasformandosi così nel più stupefacente archetipo della modernità”. Un uomo che vuole avere tutto ed è punito perché voleva avere tutto. Questo sembrerebbe il grande dramma di Faust, ma non è così. Il mito dipinge il desiderio umano di totalità, di affrancarsi, come illustra Roat in modo chiaro, persuasivo e intellegibile, “da decreti divini/dogmatici, l’ urgenza di conoscere/esplorare la realtà nei suoi più intimi recessi, senza vincoli etici/religiosi di alcun genere, infine la tracotanza di tendere in modo inesausto/ossessivo a superare ogni limite dell’ umano”(idea che richiama l’ Übermensch, il Superuomo di Nietzsche, animato dalla volontà di potenza). Faust è anche “l’ anticonformista che vuole ogni piacere delibare, ogni istinto o voglia appagare”. Ciò – prosegue l’ autore – “rappresenta una utile chiave di lettura dell’ uomo occidentale post/tardo moderno che, incline al disincanto e deluso da ogni credo ideologico, appare sempre più individualista: monade imbozzolata nella sua chiusura all’ insegna di un narcisismo tendente alla reificazione dell’ altro da sé e tutto preso da una perenne tensione/fibrillazione desiderante”, ove non scivoli nella stasi depressiva, in un tedium vitae privo di passioni o peggio ancora in un nichilismo mortifero di un soggetto disamorato, ignavo e indifferente non solo al tu e a Dio, ma anche al proprio io”.

historie_gasthaus-zum-loewen-staufen

A memory impressed in the wall of Staufen Zum Löwen roadhouse telling about the deal between Faust and Mephistopheles

Giovinezza, amore, denaro, potere, questi i doni concessi da Mefistofele a Faust, desideri che animano anche la contemporaneità, uno tra tutti, il desiderio di prolungare la propria vita, poiché il dramma dell’ individuo, come afferma lo scrittore, nasce dalla finitudine della condizione umana, la consapevolezza di avere un inizio e una fine ovvero di morire, diversamente dagli animali, che non hanno consapevolezza della propria morte, ma soltanto di quella altrui. Ciò, un fatto, una realtà con cui tutti prima o dopo ci confrontiamo ovvero con la morte, dovrebbe essere invece un monito a vivere con gioia, pacificati con il nostro animo e con il mondo che ci circonda in questa breve vita, senza reprimere o annichilire il desiderio, prerogativa umana e moto propulsore della vita e del suo dinamismo, ma ancorandolo al principio di realtà, emancipandolo dalle illusioni ovvero dal desiderare invano – con le rinunce rispetto al principio del piacere che esso implica -, in cui “sensibilità e ragione restano l’ una a fianco dell’ altra e invitano l’ individuo al suo superamento”. “Contemplare il cielo e l’ ordine dell’ universo – e in pari tempo tendere a sollevarci per il tempo che ci è concesso – vuol dire abbracciare una visione della vita che sposti l’ accento sulla morte come legge di vita; vuol dire prendere consapevolezza dell’ impossibilità di ogni assoluto, eterno piacere. Vuol dire abbracciare i chiaroscuri di una persistente umbratilità”. Questo il cuore, il monito e insegnamento che si trae dalla lettura di questo libro – preziosa perla di saggezza per pensare e ripensarsi – e dal mito di Faust che non è punito da Dio, il quale sottrae al momento della morte la sua anima a Mefistofele e lo fa ascendere al cielo, poiché nonostante tutto “erra l’ uomo finché cerca”, affermava il Signore nel Prologo in cielo all’ inizio del Faust. E Dio pertanto è indulgente verso chi – come Faust – “ha fatto della tensione inesausta e mai paga verso la pienezza vitale, l’ assoluto, la conoscenza o in altri termini verso l’ alterità/ulteriorità rispetto a tutto quanto è ordinario, finito e noto la propria ragione di vita”.

6

Me, myself and I along with Edoardo Quarantelli and his wife at the Rome Aseq bookshop, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

 

www.aseq.it

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Torpedo the Ark, philosophy blog by Stephen Alexander featuring me

Torpedo the Ark, philosophy blog by Stephen Alexander featuring me

I recently ran into Stephen Alexander and the philosophy blog he made Torpedo the Ark, that yesterday featured a post about the six reasons why fashion is fabulous and the question of style is philosophically crucial, giving rises to many thoughts (as the notion of fashion as method for consummation of nihilism) and questions – especially the one concerning the superficiality of fashion, as I always believed fashion is a serious, relevant issue, considered the art of geniuses like Mariano Fortuny, Madeleine Vionnet, Elsa Schiaparelli, Yves Saint Laurent, Cristobal Balenciaga, Gianni Versace, Alexander Mc Queen who made fashion a work of art, others like Vivienne Westwood, Moschino who criticized and mocked the contemporary times and its pathologies, bringer of a healthy ethic who gave rise to genuine revolutions in the realm of fashion and recently also other ones as the illuminated fashion designer Ilaria Venturini Fendi, creator of ethical fashion brand Carmina Campus promoting the sustainability and the culture of re-use -, focusing on interesting themes as dandyism, queer and camp culture I observe, explore and celebrate and in the end including me, circumstance which amazes, touches and honors me. Here to you the post I am glad to feature and share with you.

Mariano Fortuny

Mariano Fortuny

Six reasons why fashion is fabulous and the question of style is philosophically crucial:

1) Because Professor Teufelsdröckh, despite being a typical German Idealist in many respects, is right to suggest that in the “one pregnant subject of clothes, rightly understood, is included all that men have thought, dreamed, done, and been” [Sartor Resartus].

Madeleine Vionnet

Madeleine Vionnet

2) With its obsessive desire for the New as a value in and of itself, the logic of fashion is the determining principle of modernity. To his credit, Kant, who was often mocked by his friends for his fine silk shirts and  silver-buckled shoes, was one of the first to identify this irrational principle and note that fashion therefore has nothing to do with aesthetic criteria (i.e. it’s not a striving after beauty, but novelty, innovation, and constant change). Designers seek to make their own creations as superfluous as quickly as possible; they don’t seek to improve on anything and there is no progress, purpose, or ultimate goal within the world of fashion (a short skirt is not an advance on a long dress). If it can be said to have any aim at all, it is to be a potentially endless proliferation of forms and colors.

Elsa Schiaparelli wearing the hat she made (1937)

Elsa Schiaparelli wearing the hat she made (1937)

3) It’s true that many philosophers regard fashion as something trivial and beneath their attention. Doubtless this is why the most interesting work written on the subject has tended to come from the pens of our poets and novelists including Baudelaire, Wilde, Mallarmé, Edgar Allan Poe, Proust, and D. H. Lawrence. But there are notable exceptions to this: Nietzsche, Barthes and Baudrillard, for example, all concerned themselves with the language of fashion and the question of style. And they did so because they understood that once the playful and promiscuous indeterminacy of fashion begins to affect the ‘heavy sphere of signs’ then the liquidation of values associated with the order of referential reason is accelerated to a point of rupture. Fashion, in other words, is a method for the consummation of nihilism.

Charles Baudelaire, photo by Félix Nadar

Charles Baudelaire, photo by Félix Nadar

4) Closely associated with fashion is the practice of dandyism: whilst primarily thought of as a late eighteenth and early nineteenth century phenomenon, dandyism can in fact be traced back as an ethos or way of living to the Classical world of ancient Greece, where techniques of the self and arts of existence were accorded singular importance amongst all those who wished to give style to their lives (i.e. that one needful thing which, in all matters, is the essential thing rather than sincerity).

Lord George Bryan Brummell known as "The Beau"

Lord George Bryan Brummel known as “The Beau”

5) The world of fashion also understands and perpetuates ideas of camp and queer. The first of these things, thought of somewhat problematically as a sensibility by Susan Sontag, taught us how to place quotation marks around certain artefacts and actions and thereby magically transform things with previously little or no worth into things with ironic value and perversely sophisticated appeal. Camp thus challenges conventional notions of good taste and high art and also comes to the defence of those forms and, indeed, those individuals, traditionally marginalized and despised.

As for queer, it’s never easy or advisable to try and summarize this notion; it’s a necessarily mobile and ambiguous concept that resists any fixed definition. Indeed, it’s technically impossible to say what queerness ‘is’ as isness is precisely what’s at issue in its rejection of all forms of onto-essentialism: it refers to nothing in particular and demarcates a transpositional positionality in relation to the normative. In other words, queer is a critical movement of resistance at odds with the legitimate and the dominant; it challenges the authority of those who would keep us all on the straight and narrow and wearing sensible shoes.

Nunzia Garoffolo

Nunzia Garoffolo

6) Finally, fashion matters because, without it, figures such as Nunzia Garoffolo would not exist and without women such as this in the world, clothed in the colours of the rainbow, life would be as ugly and as dull as it would be without flowers. We do not need priests all in black, or politicians all in grey. But we do need those individuals who bring a little splendour and gorgeousness into the world, otherwise there is only boredom and uniformity.

 MODA & FILOSOFIA: “PHILOSOPHY ON THE CATWALK” SU THE TORPEDO THE ARK, IL BLOG DI STEPHEN ALEXANDER

Yves Saint Laurent, photo by Richard Avedon

Yves Saint Laurent, photo by Richard Avedon

Mi sono recentemente imbattuta in Stephen Alexander e nel suo blog di filosofia Torpedo the Ark che ieri ha presentato un post sulle sei ragioni per cui la moda è splendida e la questione dello stile è filosoficamente rilevante, dando vita a plurime riflessioni (quali la nozione di moda quale metodo di attuazione del nichilismo) e interrogativi – specialmente quello inerente la superficialità della moda, avendo sempre creduto che la moda sia una cosa seria, importante, considerando  l’ arte di geni quali Mariano Fortuny, Madeleine Vionnet, Elsa Schiaparelli, Yves Saint Laurent, Cristobal Balenciaga, Gianni Versace, Alexander Mc Queen che hanno reso la moda un’ opera d’ arte, altri quali Vivienne Westwood, Moschino che hanno criticato e beffeggiato la contemporaneità e le sue patologie, portatori di una salubre etica che ha dato vita ad autentiche rivoluzioni nell’ ambito della moda e recentemente anche altri quali l’  illuminata fashion designer Ilaria Venturini Fendi, creatrice del brand di moda ethical Carmina Campus che promuove la sostenibilità e la cultura del riuso -, affrontando interessanti tematiche quali il dandismo, la cultura camp e queer che osservo, esploro e celebro e alla fine include me, circostanza che mi emoziona, commuove e onora. Eccovi il post che sono lieta di presentare e condividere con voi.

Cristobal Balenciaga

Cristobal Balenciaga

Sei ragioni per cui la moda è fantastica e il problema dello stile è filosoficamente determinante:

Ilaria Venturini Fendi

Ilaria Venturini Fendi

1) Stante il Professore Teufelsdröckh, nonostante sia per molti aspetti un tipico idealista tedesco, é ragionevole suggerire che in “qualsiasi tema significativo di abiti, ragionevolmente inteso, è incluso tutto ciò che gli uomini hanno pensato, sognato, fatto e che sono stati” [Sartor Resartus].

Gianni Versace, photo by Nancy Ellison

Gianni Versace, photo by Nancy Ellison

2) Con il suo ossessivo desiderio di nuovo quale valore in sé e di sé, la logica della moda è il determinante principio di modernità. Per merito suo, Kant, che è stato sovente preso in giro dai suoi amici per le sue raffinate camicie di seta e le scarpe con le fibbie d’ argento, è stato uno dei primi a identificare questo principio irrazionale e notare che la moda non ha pertanto nulla a che fare con il criteri estetici (n.b. non è protesa verso la bellezza, ma la novità, l’ innovazione e il cambiamento costante). I designers cercano di realizzare le proprie creazioni tanto superficialmente quanto più velocemente possibile, non cercano di migliorare qualcosa e non c’è alcun progresso, scopo o fine ultimo all’ interno del mondo della moda ( una gonna corta non è un anticipazione di una gonna lunga). Semmai potrà ritenersi per avere una qualsiasi finalità che dovrà essere una potenziale proliferazione senza fine di forme e colori.

Vivienne Westwood, photo by Juergen Teller

Vivienne Westwood, photo by Juergen Teller

3) É vero che plurimi filosofi guardano la moda come qualcosa di triviale e al di sotto della loro attenzione. Senza dubbio ciò è il motivo per cui la più interessante opera scritta sull’ argomento è spesso provenuta dalle penne dei nostri poeti e scrittori che includono Baudelaire, Wilde, Mallarmé, Edgar Allan Poe, Proust e D. H. Lawrence. Ma ci sono illustri eccezioni a ciò: Nietzsche, Barthes e Baudrillard, per esempio, tutti si interessavano del linguaggio della moda e della questione dello stile. E costoro hanno effettuato ciò avendo compreso che quando la ludica e promiscua indeterminatezza della moda comincia a toccare “la pesante sfera dei segni”,poi la liquidazione di valori associati con l’ ordine della ragione referenziale è accelerata verso un punto di rottura. La moda in altre parole è un metodo di attuazione del nichilismo.

Alexander McQueen

Alexander McQueen

4)Strettamente associate alla moda è la pratica del dandismo: benché primariamente ritenuto fenomeno del tardo diciottesimo secolo e degli inizi del diciannovesimo secolo, il dandismo può infatti essere rimesso a fuoco quale un ethos o modo di vivere del mondo classico dell’ antica Grecia, in cui era data rilevante importanza alle tecniche del sé e arti di esistenza tra tutte quelle cose che gli individui ritenevano di dessero stile alle proprie vite (ossia quella qualsiasi cosa indispensabile che, in tutte le questioni, è la cosa essenziale invece della sincerità).

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde

5) II mondo della moda comprende e perpetua anche idee di camp e queer. La prima di queste cose, ritenuta in qualche misura problematicamente una sensibilità da Susan Sontag, ci ha insegnato il modo in cui porre le virgolette intorno a certi artefatti e azioni e in tal modo trasformare magicamente le cose come prima erano senza alcun significato o valore in cose di valore ironico e dal fascino perversamente sofisticato. Camp pertanto cambia nel nozioni convenzionali di buon gusto e arte di pregio ed giunge anche alla difesa di quelle forme e, realmente, degli individui che tradizionalmente sono marginalizzati e disprezzati.

Moschino

Moschino

Mentre per il queer, non è mai facile o consigliabile provare a sintetizzare questa nozione, essendo un concetto necessariamente mobile e ambiguo che resiste a ogni definizione fissa. È davvero tecnicamente impossibile dire ciò che la queerness ‘sia’ quale “isness” sia precisamente, ciò che è il tema centrale nel suo rifiuto di tutte le forme dell’ essenzialismo ontologico: fa riferimento a niente in particolare e demarca una posizionalità transposizinale in relazione a ciò che è normativo. In altre parole queer é un movimento critico di resistenza in conflitto con ciò che è legittimo e dominante; si muta il potere di quelli che vigilerebbero su tutti noi in modo leale e angusto.

 

6) Infine, la moda è importante, poichè senza di lei, personalità quali Nunzia Garoffolo non esisterebbero e senza donne come lei nel mondo, vestite dei colori dell’ arcobaleno, la vita sarebbe tanto terribile e tanto noiosa come si starebbe se non ci fossero i fiori. Non abbiamo bisogno di preti tutti in nero o politici tutti in grigio. Abbiamo invece bisogno di quegli individui che portano un pò di splendore e bellezza nel mondo, altrimenti esiste soltanto  noia e uniformità.

Nunzia Garoffolo

Nunzia Garoffolo

 

http://torpedotheark.blogspot.co.uk