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photo by N

photo by N

It follows my tale in reverse, made by words and images featuring “Art and food”, the exhibition curated by Germano Celantrunning through 1st November 2015 – recently opened at the Milan Triennale Design Museum. A lapse of time going mostly from Fifties to Eighties is told the exhibition’s path second section. A suggestive showcase which exhibits many objects, talking about the relationship between food and art, a theme explored through the photography by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ugo Mulas, pop-art by Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Mimmo Rotella, Roy Lichtenstein and other artists, enriched by the creations made by the fashion designer Ken Scott( though fashion is a delicate presence, just murmured into the exhibition, evidence of a culture eradicate in Italy which still considers fashion as a secondary discipline and gives the primacy to the visual arts), the commercials by Armando Testa (bright creative who made the commercial saga of Carmensita for the Paulista coffee by Lavazza ) and impressed also on music, embodied in the cover albums of celebrated bands as Rolling Stones.

L’ INAUGURAZIONE DELLA MOSTRA “ART & FOOD” AL MUSEO DEL DESIGN DELLA TRIENNALE DI MILANO(2)

Henri Cartier Bresson, Sunday on the sanks of the Seine river, 1938, Collection Henri Cartier- Bresson Foundation, photo by N

Henri Cartier Bresson, Sunday on the sanks of the Seine river, 1938, Collection Henri Cartier- Bresson Foundation, photo by N

Prosegue il mio racconto a ritroso, fatto di parole e immagini di cui è protagonista “Art and food”, la mostra curata Germano Celant – che prosegue fino all’ 1 novembre 2015 – recentemente inaugurata al Museo del Design della Triennale di Milano. Un lasso di tempo che va principalmente dagli anni Cinquanta agli anni Ottanta è raccontato dalla seconda sezione del percorso espositivo. Una suggestiva rassegna che espone plurimi oggetti che parlano della relazione tra cibo e arte, un tema esplorato attraverso la fotografia di Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ugo Mulas, la pop-art Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Mimmo Rotella, Roy Lichtenstein, arricchita dalle creazioni del fashion designer Ken Scott(benché la moda sia una presenza delicata, appena sussurrata all’ interno della mostra, dimostrazione di una cultura da sradicare in Italia che ancora considera la moda come una disciplina secondaria rispetto alla primazia data alle arti visive), dalle pubblicità di Armando Testa (brillante creativo che ha realizzato la saga pubblicitaria di Carmensita per il caffè Paulista di Lavazza) e impressa anche nella musica, racchiusa negli album delle copertine di celebri band quali i Rolling Stones.

Nino Migliori, Bread delivery boy, 1956, Bologna, Nino Migliori archive, photo by N

Nino Migliori, Bread delivery boy, 1956, Bologna, Nino Migliori archive, photo by N

 

Robert Indiana. the electric eat, 1964, courtesy of Galerie Gmurzynska AG, photo by N

Robert Indiana. the electric eat, 1964, courtesy of Galerie Gmurzynska AG, photo by N

 

Ugo Mulas, photo by N

Ugo Mulas, photo by N

 

Ugo Mulas, The Warhol factory,  photo by N

Ugo Mulas, The Warhol factory, photo by N

 

Ugo Mulas, Andy Warhol at the Warhol factory,  photo by N

Ugo Mulas, Andy Warhol at the Warhol factory, photo by N

 

Andy Warhol, Campbell's soup| Portfolio, 1968, private collection, New York

Andy Warhol, Campbell’s soup| Portfolio, 1968, private collection, New York

 

Andy Warhol, Del Monte  peach halves, 1964, Mugrabi Collection, 1964, Kellog's corn flakes box, 1964,  courtesy of the Brant Foundation, Greenwich, photo by N

Andy Warhol, Del Monte peach halves, 1964, Mugrabi Collection, 1964, Kellog’s corn flakes box, 1964, courtesy of the Brant Foundation, Greenwich, photo by N

 

Robert Rauschenberg, Hungry weeds, 1969, Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, New York, photo by N

Robert Rauschenberg, Hungry weeds, 1969, Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, New York, photo by N

 

Commercial by Armando Testa, photo by N

Commercial by Armando Testa, photo by N

 

 

Roy Lichtenstein, Apple with black and blue blackground, 1982, the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation and courtesy of the Castell Gallery, New York, photo by N

Roy Lichtenstein, Apple with black and blue blackground, 1982, the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation and courtesy of the Castell Gallery, New York, photo by N

 

Roy Lichtenstein, Ceramic sculpture, 1965, private collection, Switzerland, photo by N

Roy Lichtenstein, Ceramic sculpture, 1965, private collection, Switzerland, photo by N

 

Carmensita and Caballero, the main features of commercials by Armando Testa for Paulista coffee by Lavazza, photo by N

Carmensita and Caballero, the main features of commercials by Armando Testa for Paulista coffee by Lavazza, photo by N

 

 

Another iconic persona still existing from food commercial Susanna, brand of cheese triangles by Kraft, photo by N

Another iconic persona still existing from food commercial Susanna, brand of cheese triangles by Kraft, photo by N

 

 

The cover albums by celebrated artists, photo by N

The cover albums by celebrated artists, photo by N

 

Andy Warhol, The last supper (Camel/57), 1986, Mugrabi collection, New York, photo by N

Andy Warhol, The last supper (Camel/57), 1986, Mugrabi collection, New York, photo by N

 

Mimmo Rotella, Point and a half, 1962, private collection, courtesy of Marconi Foundation, photo by N

Mimmo Rotella, Point and a half, 1962, private collection, courtesy of Marconi Foundation, photo by N

 

 

Mimmo Rotella, photo by N

Mimmo Rotella, photo by N

 

Ken Scott, Cereghino dress and cape, "Ken Scott cooks something new" Spring/Summer 1970, Piper club, January 1970, Ken Scott Foundation, Rome, photo by N

Ken Scott, Cereghino dress and cape, “Ken Scott cooks something new” Spring/Summer 1970, Piper club, January 1970, Ken Scott Foundation, Rome, photo by N

 

Ken Scott, Ruspante dress and cape, "Ken Scott cooks something new" Spring/Summer 1970, Piper club, January 1970, Ken Scott Foundation, Rome, photo by N

Ken Scott, Ruspante dress and cape, “Ken Scott cooks something new” Spring/Summer 1970, Piper club, January 1970, Ken Scott Foundation, Rome, photo by N

 

 Dieter Roth, Schokoladenplätzchenbild, 1969, Kem collection, Germany, photo by N


Dieter Roth, Schokoladenplätzchenbild, 1969, Kem collection, Germany, photo by N

 

Michelangelo Pistoletto, Bottle, 1963, Cittadellarte-Pistoletto Foundation, Biella, photo by N

Michelangelo Pistoletto, Bottle, 1963, Cittadellarte-Pistoletto Foundation, Biella, photo by N

 

Alain Jaquet, Dèjeuner sur l' herbe, 1964, Kem collection, Germany, photo by N

Alain Jaquet, Dèjeuner sur l’ herbe, 1964, Kem collection, Germany, photo by N

 

 

www.triennale.org

Sherry Vine as Lady Gaga in the video parody she made

Sherry Vine as Lady Gaga in the Marina Abramovic video parody she made

The brilliant New York artist Sherry Vine recently released a new parody on video, a smashing, hilarious and flatulent version of the video featuring the pop-star Lady Gaga who practices the Abramovic method which has included in the Kickstarter page by the Abramovic Institute to ask for people to contribute in order to give rise to the Abramovic Institute, place where the celebrated performer artist Marina Abramovic will teach and practice her method (though this project seems like the rise of a kind of ashram, a cathedral of a new orthodoxy, the performance art, which should be just art, but it doesn’ t seem very connected to the art, instead it sounds like an art marketing operation by a mainstream artist who uses an independent circuit or rather a virtual platform supporting independent projects for giving rise to a project which maybe other renowned mainstream institutions, foundations working in the realm of art could support. Thus it sounds a little bit out of context. I wish to Marina Abramovic, an artist I respect, to get the success she deserves and I thank her as this video made me think about different issues – as the status quo of art, the connection of art, real art and art marketing as well as to what is named and considered as art during the contemporary times, as well as the Gagosianizations, the way of developing art marketing in the mainstream today, considering one of its famous personas, Larry Gagosian, the way of being and making the art dealer in the contemporary times, comparing his way and Leo Castelli’s way, the celebrated art dealer who hosted in his art gallery artists as Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Liechtenstein, Andy Warhol, Cy Twombly, Richard Serra and many others -, topics I will talk during the forthcoming times). A fun video which make think about and evokes the ethic of Molière, who made fun of the more controversial and tragic sides of humanity.

L’ ARTE DELLA FLATULENZA: LA VIDEO PARODIA DEL METODO ABRAMOVIC DI SHERRY VINE

La brillante artista newyorkese Sherry Vine ha recentemente pubblicato una nuova parodia su video, una formidabile, ilare e flatulenta versione del video di cui è protagonista la pop-star Lady Gaga che pratica il metodo Abramovic che è stato incluso nella pagina di Kickstarter dell’ Abramovic Institute per chiedere alla gente di contribuire per dar vita all’ Abramovic Institute, luogo in cui la celebre performer artist Marina Abramovic insegnerà e praticherà il suo metodo ( benchè questo progetto appaia come la nascita di una sorta di ashram, una cattedrale di una nuova ortodossia, la performance art, che dovrebbe essere soltanto arte, ma non sembra molto legata all’ arte, appare invece come una operazione di marketing dell’ arte di un’ artista del mainstream che usa un circuito indipendente o meglio una piattaforma virtuale che sostiene progetti indipendenti per dar vita a un progetto che magari altre celebri istituzioni, fondazioni di mainstream che operano nell’ ambito dell’ arte avrebbero potuto supportare. Pertanto ciò mi sembra alquanto fuori contesto. Auguro a Marina Abramovic, un’ artista che rispetto, di ottenere il successo che merita e la ringrazio, poiché questo video mi ha fatto pensare a svariate problematiche – quali lo status quo dell’ arte, il legame dell’ arte, la vera arte e il marketing dell’ arte, come anche a ciò che è chiamato e considerato arte nella contemporaneità e alle Gagosianizzazioni, il modo di consolidare il marketing dell’ arte nel mainstream oggi, considerando uno dei suoi personaggi più famosi, Larry Gagosian, il modo di essere e fare il gallerista nella contemporaneità, comparando ciò con quello di Leo Castelli, il celebre gallerista che ha ospitato nella sua galleria artisti quali Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Liechtenstein, Andy Warhol, Cy Twombly, Richard Serra e molti altri -, tematiche di cui parlerò nei tempi a venire). Un divertente video che fa pensare ed evoca l’ etica di Molière che si prendeva gioco degli aspetti più discutibili e tragici dell’ umanità.

http://sherryvine.com/