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photo by N

photo by N

It’ s a modern day, a Sunday afternoon spent under the sign of fashion, high fashion and art. “To live with art”, categorical imperative of high fashion and Italy during the years 1945-1968. That is the core of “Bellissima. The Italy of high fashion 1945-1968”, exhibition opened on Sunday 30th November 2014 in Rome(where it was also held during the same day at the Auditorium della Musica the concert of legendary band of industrial music Einstuerzende Neubauten, a missed appointment) at the MAXXI Museum – running through 3rd May 2015 -, curated by Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi and Anna Mattirolo, organized in collaboration with Altaroma and Bulgari which is its main partner.

Roland Sejko, Simmetries of light Vol. III. courtesy Istituto Luce Cinecittà Srl

Roland Sejko, “Simmetries of light Vol. III”. Istituto Luce Cinecittà Srl, photo by N

Dresses by Germana Marucelli( Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Germana Marucelli archive),  and Roberto Capucci(1967, courtesy Roberto Capucci Archive) along with the artworks "Inter-ena-cubo", by Paolo Scheggi(1969, Carla and Cosimo Scheggi collection)

Dresses by Germana Marucelli( Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Germana Marucelli archive), and Roberto Capucci(1967, courtesy Roberto Capucci Archive) along with the artworks “Inter-ena-cubo”, by Paolo Scheggi(1969, Carla and Cosimo Scheggi collection), photo by N

Bulgari, the jewelry featuring in the "Snakes" collection(1965) Bulgari Heritage collection), photo by N

Bulgari, the jewelry featuring in the “Snakes” collection(1965) Bulgari Heritage collection), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( evening dress with bodice and belt in anodized aluminum, designed in collaboration with the artist Getulio Alviani, Alluminio collection, Spring/Summer 1969, private collection) and Emilio Pucci( lurex evening dress with jewelry clasp, Spring/Summer 1967, Emilio Pucci Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( evening dress with bodice and belt in anodized aluminum, designed in collaboration with the artist Getulio Alviani, Alluminio collection, Spring/Summer 1969, private collection) and Emilio Pucci( lurex evening dress with jewelry clasp, Spring/Summer 1967, Emilio Pucci Archive), photo by N

Getulio Alviani, "Forma"(1961, private collection, Pescara), photo by N

Getulio Alviani, “Forma”(1961, private collection, Pescara), photo by N

A story of art and poetry, the story of a nation, the Italy and its creativity, also impressed in the pages of a wonderful book which is much more than a catalogue of an exhibition, it’s an anthological work, full of documents, signs and visions that reorganize and rebuild an age in a syncretic way, giving rise to a red drop with the ready to wear from the following decades, the demi-couture and the contemporary creative language. And Rome, city which yesterday gave rise to these many creative alchemies, open dialogues and blends between art, film and fashion, becomes today its witness. All happens in an afternoon and finally in a museum. An important signal of a renovated sharing between art and fashion, representing a new way, a necessary dialogue between institutions and consequently a rediscovered dignity of fashion – emancipated from the prejudices, often considered only as consumer goods – which is a discipline, a source of culture having the same rank of the visual arts (a dignity recognized from a long time elsewhere or rather in many worldwide museums), hosted now by the place where it must be: the museum.

Federico Forquet( silk Evening jumpsuit with sequins owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, about 1967-1968, Courtesy Galleria del Costume di Palazzo Pitti - Donazione Tirelli), photo by N

Federico Forquet( silk evening jumpsuit with sequins owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, about 1967-1968, Courtesy Galleria del Costume di Palazzo Pitti – Donazione Tirelli) and Galitzine(Evening Pyjama, made of fringed jersey with braiding, crystals and glass beads, Fall/Winter 1960-1961, Label: Irene Galitzine Rome; label: Neiman Marcus), photo by N

Tiziani, designed by Karl Lagerfeld (evening dress made of silk crêpon, embroidered with glass beads, owned by Catherine Spaak, Fall/Winter 1967/1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti’s Galleria del Costume –Donazione Tirelli), photo by N

Tiziani, designed by Karl Lagerfeld (evening dress made of silk crêpon, embroidered with glass beads, owned by Catherine Spaak, Fall/Winter 1967/1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery –Donation by Tirelli), photo by N

Mila Schön, silk organza evening gown embroidered with medallions of pearls, rhinestones and sequins, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Fashion house Mila Schön’s Archive), photo by N

Mila Schön, (silk organza evening gown embroidered with medallions of pearls, rhinestones and sequins, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Fashion house Mila Schön’s Archive), photo by N

 Mila Schön (tulle evening dress, embroidered with beads, owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, courtesy  Palazzo Pitti  Costume Gallery- Tirelli donation), photo by N


Mila Schön (tulle evening dress, embroidered with beads, owned by Gioia Marchi Falck, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery- Donation by Tirelli), photo by N

Germana Marucelli(evening dress with sequins and silk embroidery from patterns by Pietro Zuffi, "Impero" collection, 1967, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive) and Jole Veneziani (organza short dress embroidered with stripes, sequins and jais, Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Veneziani Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli(evening dress with sequins and silk embroidery from patterns by Pietro Zuffi, “Impero” collection, 1967, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive) and Jole Veneziani (organza short dress embroidered with stripes, sequins and jais, Fall/Winter 1968-1969, courtesy Veneziani Archive), photo by N

It’s a present full of promises and energies, though it’s different from the past which exhibition tells about, from which it arises the modernity of signs, and emotions of the many stories impressed on the cloth. Shapes, spaces, colors and avant-garde suggestions, as well as craftsmanship tracing the DNA of Made in Italy and Italian fashion industry which is born yesterday as elitist and sartorial phenomenon. The couturier is the interpret and demiurge, decoding the suggestions coming from his time. Eternal works, iconic clothes, the ones by Germana Marucelli, Galitizine and Fontana Sisters, masterpieces of experimentation and irony as the lapin jumpsuit by Fendi, the dresses by Capucci and Emilio Schuberth show a fashion going beyond time. Architectures draw the femininity, made of matter, shape and colors becoming the references of exhibition. Black and white, cocktail and evening dresses, futuristic tensions and unusual lines. 80 are the clothes on show along with many accessories – including the celebrated creations by Roberta di Camerino, Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Dal Cò -, the jewelry by Bulgari and fashion jewelry by Coppola and Coppo telling about this vibrant age and do that by using other channels of communications: contemporary art, film and photography.

Galitzine( silk shantung Pyjama with shirt fully embroidered  with gold leaves and glass crystals, trousers with the same polka dot embroidered motif, 1962, label: Irene Galitzine, Rome, courtesy Galitzine Archive), photo by N

Galitzine( silk shantung Pyjama with shirt fully embroidered with gold leaves and glass crystals, trousers with the same polka dot embroidered motif, 1962, label: Irene Galitzine, Rome, courtesy Galitzine Archive), photo by N

Catalogues and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

Catalogues and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Fragiacomo( 1960, courtesy Fragiacomo) and Cavallera(1950, Courtesy City of Venice Museums - Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Fragiacomo( 1960, courtesy Fragiacomo) and Cavallera(1950, Courtesy City of Venice Museums – Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Valentino ( tulle short evening dress featuring drapes giving rise to roses, Spring/Summer 1959, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Valentino ( tulle short evening dress featuring drapes giving rise to roses, Spring/Summer 1959, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Alberto Burri, "Rosso plastica"(1961, private collection), photo by N

Alberto Burri, “Rosso plastica”(1961, private collection), photo by N

A wide setup of documents tells on film about the atmospheres of age, emphasized by the movies of legendary filmmakers as Luchino Visconti – “Bellissima”, the movie he made, is the title of exhibition -, Federico Fellini, film documentaries and photography by Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla and Ugo Mulas. The masterpieces by Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri highlight the thematic areas of exhibition path. The red dress by Valentino is matched to a work by Alberto Burri, the optical patterns by Alberto Biasi dialogue with the dress by Germana Marucelli and many others, creating a dynamic path made of lines, curves, successful asymmetries and divagations, made concrete by the set design of exhibition, a metallic path being at the wide room of MAXXI hosting it at the second floor, made by the bright architects  Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo and Guido Schinklert, makers of an experiential path, subverting the limits of space of a sole room and making usable and light an exhibition path which otherwise could become very hard and less intelligible.

Alberto Burri, "Ferro"(1960, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Alberto Burri, “Ferro”(1960, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Simonetta(two-pieces cocktail dress, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Simonetta(two-pieces cocktail dress, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Me,myself and I along wiith Adrien Yakimov, photo by N

Me,myself and I along wiith Adrien Yakimov, photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(cocktail dress,  owned by Lucy D' Albert, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(cocktail dress, owned by Lucy D’ Albert, about 1955, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection), photo by N

Marcello Mastroianni ft. in the movie "8 1/2" by Federico Fellini, photo by N

Marcello Mastroianni ft. in the movie “8 1/2” by Federico Fellini, photo by N

A motion featuring also in the mannequins by La Rosa, women – as it teaches the genius Diana Vreeland in her work as curator – and ideas on the move. Beauty and femininity, a complex talk, made of textures – as the fragments of cloths and embroideries by Fontana Sisters – and retraced by catalogues, magazines and a copious mail, precious documents telling about the relationships between the buyers, customers and ateliers, the rise of fashion industry, fashion show as event presenting and selling the fashion product (which happens for the first time on 22nd July 1952 in Florence at the Palazzo Pitti White Room).

Evening dresses by Roberto Capucci(“Azalea rosa”dress, Roberto Capucci, first show,  Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, 1961,Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), Valentino(evening dress in hand-painted sillk satin, Spring/Summer 1968, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.) and Emilio Schuberth(evening gown in silk satin with silk embroidery and glass beads,1951, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private collection), photo by N

Evening dresses by Roberto Capucci(“Azalea rosa”dress, Roberto Capucci, first show, Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, 1961,Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), Valentino(evening dress in hand-painted sillk satin, Spring/Summer 1968, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.) and Emilio Schuberth(evening gown in silk satin with silk embroidery and glass beads,1951, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private collection), photo by N

Video documenting "La settimana Incom( 1947), photo by N

Video documenting “La settimana Incom( 1947), photo by N

Botti Sisters(Evening dress in silk faille and rebrodè lace, 1957, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection) and Fontana Sisters(evening dress in damask silk with rose motifs and panel secured to the back, inspired by the traditional Japanese clothes, owned by Palma Bucarelli, 1957, courtesy Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Botti Sisters(evening dress in silk faille and rebrodè lace, 1957, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection) and Fontana Sisters(evening dress in damask silk with rose motifs and panel secured to the back, inspired by the traditional Japanese clothes, owned by Palma Bucarelli, 1957, courtesy Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Bulgari ( gold necklace with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967,  gold earrings with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, "Melone" gold vanity case with diamonds, 1960, Bulgari Heritage Collection), photo by N

Bulgari ( gold necklace with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, gold earrings with emeralds, rubies, sapphires and diamonds, 1967, “Melone” gold vanity case with diamonds, 1960, Bulgari Heritage Collection), photo by N

Bulgari,  photo by N

Bulgari, photo by N

A happening enriched by the performance of artist Vanessa Beecroft, known for her semiotic affiliation with the fashion world, who staged exclusively for the event VB74, a tableau vivant made of women wrapped by veils, depicting and looking into femininity, the being and its clothing. A cooled, stripped idea which becomes abstract and embodies that catchy aesthetics which made famous the artist. An art which represents itself and answers to the questions of being through the silence of body and matter, the veil, lights and shadows. A “staged” idea revealing the essence by itself.

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft,  photo by N

VB74 by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Vanessa Beecroft talking with the professor Monica Bolzoni, photo by N

Vanessa Beecroft talking with the professor Monica Bolzoni, photo by N

Essence of the non-existent, that being non-existent which represents the individual seen by Carmelo Bene, though it’s not obscene, out of the stage, but it is and stays in the stage for three hours, the duration of performance which was also held on 28th November at the MAXXI for the gala dinner of exhibition for the MAXXI’s fund-raising, event where generously fashion supported art, calling its most famous features along with a plethora of more and less famous personas, known in the socialite news sections who, happy and cash, contributed to the success of evening – widely told by the website Dagospia of brilliant and ironic journalist Roberto D’ Agostino -, a fund-raising amounting to about 600.000 Euros (for an institution which – as many others Italian museums is not very well -, suffering since months, circumstances which is often told by news, resulting from the moment of precariousness and uncertainty the culture in Italy, its country and people experience).

Fontana Sisters( embroideries on cloth, 1949, 1964, 1953, Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Fontana Sisters( embroideries on cloth, 1949, 1964, 1953, Historical Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation), photo by N

Fernanda Gattinoni( short evening dress in moiré silk with velved and satin, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, evening cape in velvet with satin lining, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, two pieces evening dress, trousers in marocain crêpe silk  and blouse in silk organza, work by Anna Magnani, 1956, Historical Archive Fernanda and Raniero Gattinoni), photo by N

Fernanda Gattinoni( short evening dress in moiré silk with velved and satin, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, evening cape in velvet with satin lining, worn by Anna Magnani, 1951, two pieces evening dress, trousers in marocain crêpe silk and blouse in silk organza, work by Anna Magnani, 1956, Historical Archive Fernanda and Raniero Gattinoni), photo by N

Ava Gardner wearing the “Pretino” dress, (created for her by the Fontana Sisters, "Pretino" dress, 1955, courtesy Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Ava Gardner wearing the “Pretino” dress, (created for her by the Fontana Sisters, “Pretino” dress, 1955,
courtesy Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Salvatore Ferragamo( décolleté shoe made in glided kid, made for Marylin Monroe for the movie by Joshua Logan "Bus stop", 1967,  décolleté shoe in satin with rhinestones appliques and stiletto heel,owned by Marylin Monroe, 1958-1959, décolleté show made of crocodile leather created for Marilyn Monroe, 1958-1959, "Damigella" ankle boot in stretch brocade-effect silk fabric, created for Sophia Loren, 1957, "Madonna", closed-toe sandal with vamp bearing flowers embroidered in silk, glass beads and rhinestones, created for Sophia Loren, 1955, "Ranina" sandal with upper in Tavernelle lace and sequin appliqués, lining in transparent vinilite, flared  Louis XV heel, made for Anna Magnani, 1955, Courtesy Salvatore Ferragamo Museum), photo by N

Salvatore Ferragamo( décolleté shoe made in glided kid, made for Marylin Monroe for the movie by Joshua Logan “Bus stop”, 1967, décolleté shoe in satin with rhinestones appliques and stiletto heel,owned by Marylin Monroe, 1958-1959, décolleté show made of crocodile leather created for Marilyn Monroe, 1958-1959, “Damigella” ankle boot in stretch brocade-effect silk fabric, created for Sophia Loren, 1957, “Madonna”, closed-toe sandal with vamp bearing flowers embroidered in silk, glass beads and rhinestones, created for Sophia Loren, 1955, “Ranina” sandal with upper in Tavernelle lace and sequin appliqués, lining in transparent vinilite, flared Louis XV heel, made for Anna Magnani, 1955, Courtesy Salvatore Ferragamo Museum), photo by N

Mingolini Guggenheim, short evening dress in organza, owned by Silvana Pampanini, late 1960, Courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery - Tirelli Donation) and Fausto Sarli ( short evening dress in fabric embroidered with pearls, Swarovski crystals and glass baguettes designed for Mina ft. in the "Studio Uno" TV program, mid-1960, courtesy Atelier Sarli Couture), photo by N

Mingolini Guggenheim, short evening dress in organza, owned by Silvana Pampanini, late 1960, Courtesy Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery – Tirelli Donation) and Fausto Sarli ( short evening dress in fabric embroidered with pearls, Swarovski crystals and glass baguettes designed for Mina ft. in the “Studio Uno” TV program, mid-1960, courtesy Atelier Sarli Couture), photo by N

That is also a positive sign, I hope it’s the beginning of a new dialogue being more productive, deep and solid between the museums and the fashion world to develop in a long term period and build new ways, sow ideas looking at the culture as food for Italy and its minds, what makes us thinking, autonomous and free, a kind of food being necessary and universal. I also wish that is the first step for making a series of exhibitions on fashion that are – not set up sporadically and hopefully not set up in a sole, though it’s wide, room – set up in the Italian museums (telling that I think about the exhibition which during this year celebrated the Made in Italy in London, at the Victoria & Albert Museum and I also think about the new technologies to use to make more complete and understandably the tale of an exhibition).

UNA GIORNATA MODERNA: L’ INAUGURAZIONE DI “BELLISSIMA. L’ ITALIA DELL’ ALTA MODA 1945-1968” AL MUSEO MAXXI DI ROMA

Federico Garolla(two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking in steps of Central State Archive, Rome, 1958), photo by N

Federico Garolla(two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking in steps of Central State Archive, Rome, 1958), photo by N

Una giornata moderna, una domenica pomeriggio passata all’ insegna della moda, dell’ alta moda e dell’ arte. “Vivere con arte”, imperativo categorico dell’ alta moda e l’ Italia durante gli anni 1945-1968. Questo il cuore di “Bellissima”, mostra inaugurata domenica 30 novembre 2014 a Roma (in cui si è anche tenuto nello stesso giorno all’ Auditorium della Musica il concerto della leggendaria band di musica industrial Einstuerzende Neubauten, un appuntamento mancato) presso il MAXXI – che prosegue fino al 3 maggio 2015 -, curata da Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi e Anna Mattirolo, organizzata in collaborazione con Altaroma e Bulgari che ne è il main partner.

Emilio Schuberth(tulle dress, decorated with beads and sequins in floral motifs, worn by Gina Lollobrigida, about 1953, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection), photo by N

Emilio Schuberth(tulle dress, decorated with beads and sequins in floral motifs, worn by Gina Lollobrigida, about 1953, courtesy Gabriella Lo Faro Private Collection), photo by N

Fendi (Jumpsuit in black rabbit, with diagonally symmetric pattern, adorned with jewel buttons, chiffon and lace on the collar and wrists, Fall/Winter 1067-1968, Fendi Historical Archive) and Valentino (ensemble in cotton mikado, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Fendi (Jumpsuit in black rabbit, with diagonally symmetric pattern, adorned with jewel buttons, chiffon and lace on the collar and wrists, Fall/Winter 1067-1968, Fendi Historical Archive) and Valentino (ensemble in cotton mikado, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A.), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Fendi (mink coat, 1960, Fendi historical archive), photo by N

Fendi (mink coat, 1960, Fendi historical archive), photo by N

"Bellissima", fashion and the art by Lucio Fontana( "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli)" 1968, private collection, Rome), photo by N

“Bellissima”, fashion and the art by Paolo Scheggi (“Zone riflessse”, 1963,  National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Paolo Scheggi “Zone riflesse”( 1963, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome),

Una storia d’ arte e di poesia, la storia di una nazione, l’ Italia e della sua creatività, impressa anche nelle pagine di un libro che è più di un catalogo di una mostra,opera antologica da avere, colma di documentazioni, segni, visioni che riordinano e costruiscono un’ epoca in chiave sincretica, dando vita a un “fil rouge” con il prêt à porter dei decenni successivi, il demi-couture e il linguaggio creativo contemporaneo. E Roma, città che ha dato vita ieri a queste plurime alchimie creative, dialoghi aperti e contaminazioni tra arte, cinema e moda, ne diventa oggi la testimone. Accade tutto in un pomeriggio e finalmente in un museo. Un segnale importante di una rinnovata condivisione tra arte e moda, simbolo di una nuova strada, un necessitato dialogo tra istituzioni e conseguentemente una ritrovata dignità della moda – emancipata dai pregiudizi, sovente considerata unicamente quale bene di consumo -, la quale è una disciplina, una fonte di cultura di egual rango a quello delle arti visive(una dignità riconosciuta da tempo altrove ovvero in plurime istituzioni museali di tutto il mondo), ospite adesso del luogo in cui deve stare: il museo.

Enzo( dress, early 1960,  courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli collection) and Capucci ( Sculpture-dress in satin organza, Box line, 1958, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Enzo( dress, early 1960, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli collection) and Capucci ( Sculpture-dress in satin organza, Box line, 1958, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Lucio Fontana( "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli)" 1968, private collection, Rome), photo by N

Paolo Scheggi “Zone riflesse”( 1963, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Giuseppe Capogrossi, "Superficie 294"( 1958, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

Giuseppe Capogrossi, “Superficie 294″( 1958, National Gallery of Modern Art, Rome), photo by N

The magazines and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

The magazines and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Un presente ricco di promesse e di energie, di certo diverso dal passato che la mostra racconta, da cui però si evince l’ attualità di segni ed emozioni di tante storie impresse su tessuto. Forme, spazi, colori e suggestioni avveniristiche, ma anche artigianalità che traccia il dna del Made in Italy e dell’ industria della moda italiana che nasce ieri quale fenomeno elitario e sartoriale. Il couturier è l’ interprete e il demiurgo del suo tempo, decodifica in segni e visioni le suggestioni del suo presente. Opere immortali, abiti iconici, quelli di Germana Marucelli, Galitizine e delle Sorelle Fontana, capolavori di sperimentazione e di ironia come la tuta di lapin di Fendi, gli abiti di Capucci e di Emilio Schuberth, che testimonia una moda che va al di là del tempo. Architetture disegnano la femminilità fatta di materia, forma e colori che diventano i riferimenti della mostra. Il bianco e nero, gli abiti da cocktail e da gran sera, le tensioni futuristiche e le forme insolite. 80 sono gli abiti unitamente a plurimi accessori – che comprendono le celebri creazioni di Roberta di Camerino, Gucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Dal Cò -, i gioielli di Bulgari e la bigiotteria di Coppola e Coppo che raccontano questa vibrante epoca e lo fanno avvalendosi di altri canali di comunicazione: l’ arte contemporanea, il cinema e la fotografia.

The catalogues and documents ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

The catalogues and documents ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Fontana Sisters( 1960, A.N.G.E.L.O Vintage Archive) and Mila Schön ( 1960, private collection), photo by N

Fontana Sisters( 1960, A.N.G.E.L.O Vintage Archive) and Mila Schön ( 1960, private collection), photo by N

 Pasquale De Antonis(1947), photo by N

Pasquale De Antonis(1947), photo by N

Roberta di Camerino( early and mid 1960. courtesy A.N.G.E.L.O. Vintage Archive), photo by N

Roberta di Camerino( early and mid 1960. courtesy A.N.G.E.L.O. Vintage Archive), photo by N

Un ampio apparato documentaristico racconta su pellicola le atmosfere di un epoca e le visioni, enfatizzate dal segno di leggendari registi quali Luchino Visconti – il cui film “Bellissima” è il titolo della mostra -, Federico Fellini, da documentari e dalle fotografie di Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla e Ugo Mulas. I capolavori di Fontana, Burri enfatizzano le aree tematiche del percorso della mostra. L’ abito rosso di Valentino abbinato a un’ opera di Burri, i motivi optical di Alberto Biasi dialogano con l’ abito di Germana Marucelli e molti altri, creando un percorso dinamico, fatto di linee e curve, felici asimmetrie e divagazioni, concretizzate dal set design della mostra, un sentiero metallico presso la grande sala del MAXXI che la ospita al secondo piano, realizzato dai brillanti architetti Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo e Guido Schinklert, fautori di un cammino esperienziale che sovverte i limiti dello spazio ovvero di un’ unica sala e rende fruibile e lieve un percorso espositivo che altrimenti sarebbe potuto divenire oltremodo arduo e poco intellegibile.

Gucci ( Courtesy Gucci Archive), photo by N

Gucci ( courtesy Gucci Archive), photo by N

Alberto Fabiani(reversible wool day overcoat, Spring/Summer 1961, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection) and Pino Lancetti( Wool coat with silk liningm Spring/Summer 1965, City of Venice Museums Foundation- Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Alberto Fabiani(reversible wool day overcoat, Spring/Summer 1961, courtesy Enrico Quinto and Paolo Tinarelli Collection) and Pino Lancetti( Wool coat with silk liningm Spring/Summer 1965, City of Venice Museums Foundation- Fortuny Museum- G. Pallavicini Collection), photo by N

Magazines ft. in "Bellissima", photo by N

Magazines ft. in “Bellissima”, photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (1950 and 1960, courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(turban in Zoagli silk velvet decorated with pearl and rhinestone embroidery, 1945, courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Hats and hairdresses by Clemente Cartoni (courtesy of Palazzo Pitti Costume Gallery -Tornabuoni-Lineapiù donation) and Gallia and Peter(courtesy Gallia and Peter Milan), photo by N

Un moto impresso anche nei manichini di La Rosa, donne – come insegna Diana Vreeland nelle vesti di curatrice – e idee in movimento. Bellezza e femminilità, un discorso complesso, fatto di molteplici textures – come i frammenti di tessuti e ricami delle Sorelle Fontana – e rievocate da cataloghi, riviste e da una fitta corrispondenza, preziosa documentazione che racconta i rapporti tra i buyer, i clienti e gli atelier, la nascita dell’ industria della moda, della sfilata quale evento di presentazione e vendita del prodotto moda (che avviene per la prima volta il 22 luglio 1952 a Firenze nella Sala Bianca di Palazzo Pitti).

Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Cocktail dress in silk twill with optical motifs, designed by teaming with Getulio Alviani, "Optical collection", Spring/Summer, 1965, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Cocktail dress in silk twill with optical motifs, designed by teaming with Getulio Alviani, “Optical collection”, Spring/Summer, 1965, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Lucio Fontana  "Concetto Spaziale - Attese (bianco e due tagli) -1968, private collection, Rome,- and Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Lucio Fontana
“Concetto Spaziale – Attese (bianco e due tagli) – 1968, private collection, Rome – and Alberto Biasi (1964-1965, National Gallery of Modern Art), photo by N

Valentino( silk evening pyjama, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A,) and Roberto Capucci, "Omaggio a Vasarely", sculpture-dress inspired by the artist's works with interwoven optical effect satin ribbons and ostrich feathers, 1965, Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Valentino( silk evening pyjama, Spring/Summer 1966, courtesy Valentino S.P.A,) and Roberto Capucci, “Omaggio a Vasarely”, sculpture-dress inspired by the artist’s works with interwoven optical effect satin ribbons and ostrich feathers, 1965, Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Un happening arricchito dalla performance dell’ artista Vanessa Beecroft, nota per le sue affiliazioni semiotiche con il mondo della moda, che ha messo in scena per l’ occasione VB74, un tableau vivant fatto di donne avvolte da veli che ritrae e indaga la femminilità, l’ essere e il suo vestimentum. Un’ idea refrigerata, scarnificata che diventa astratta e racchiude in sé quell’ accattivante estetica che ha reso famosa l’ artista. Un’ arte che rappresenta sé stessa e risponde agli interrogativi dell’ essere con il silenzio di corpo e materia, il velo, luci e ombre. Un concetto “staged” che svela in sé la sua essenza.

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Giampiero Mughini, photo by N

Me, myself and I along with Giampiero Mughini, photo by N

L’ essenza dell’ inesistente, di quell’ inesistente essente che rappresenta l’ individuo visto da Carmelo Bene, che però non è osceno, fuori scena, ma è e resta in scena per tre ore, durata della performance che si è tenuta anche il 28 novembre al Maxxi in occasione della cena di gala della mostra per la raccolta fondi del MAXXI, evento in cui la moda ha generosamente sostenuto l’ arte, chiamando a sé i suoi più famosi protagonisti unitamente a una pletora di personaggi più e meno noti nelle cronache mondane che, felici e contanti, hanno contribuito al successo della serata – ampiamente raccontata dal sito web Dagospia del brillante e ironico giornalista Roberto D’ Agostino -, una raccolta fondi pari a circa 600.000 Euro (per una istituzione che – come tante altre istituzioni museali italiane – non versa in condizioni felici, soffrendo da mesi, circostanza raccontata da cronache giornalistiche, per il periodo di precarietà e incertezza in cui versa la cultura in Italia, la stessa nazione e la sua popolazione).

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

VB74 , performance by Vanessa Beecroft, photo by N

Stefano Tonchi and Maria Luisa Frisa talking with a friend, photo by N

Stefano Tonchi and Maria Luisa Frisa talking with a friend, photo by N

Anche questo è un segnale positivo, che spero sia l’ inizio di un nuovo dialogo più costruttivo, profondo e solido tra le istituzioni museali e il mondo della moda che si sviluppi nel lungo periodo e costruisca nuove vie, semini idee che guardino al lungo periodo e alla cultura, come nutrimento dell’ Italia e delle sue menti, ciò che ci rende pensanti, autonomi e liberi, una forma di cibo necessaria e universale. Mi auguro anche che questo sia il primo passo per realizzare una serie di mostre in materia di moda allestite – non più sporadicamente e sperabilmente non in un’ unica, seppur ampia, sala – nei musei italiani (dicendo ciò penso alla mostra che quest’ anno ha celebrato il made in Italy a Londra, presso il Victoria & Albert Museum e penso anche alle nuove tecnologie di cui dotarsi per render ancor più esaustivo e fruibile il racconto di una mostra).

Mila Schön,  coat in plain-weave double wool with intarsia inspired by Lucio Fontana's cuts, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Giorgio Schön) and Roberto Capucci, "Omaggio a Burri", georgette coat with applied wool elements, inspired by the artist's works, 1969, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Mila Schön, coat in plain-weave double wool with intarsia inspired by Lucio Fontana’s cuts, Spring/Summer 1969, courtesy Giorgio Schön) and Roberto Capucci, “Omaggio a Burri”, georgette coat with applied wool elements, inspired by the artist’s works, 1969, courtesy Historical Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation), photo by N

Coppola and Toppo, photo by N

Coppola and Toppo, photo by N

Germana Marucelli( 1962. 1967-1968, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

Germana Marucelli( 1962. 1967-1968, courtesy Germana Marucelli Archive), photo by N

 

www.fondazionemaxxi.it

Anna Magnani, still image from the movie "Bellissima" by Luchino Visconti

Anna Magnani, still image from the movie “Bellissima” by Luchino Visconti, 1951, courtesy National Film Library – Film Experimental Centre

Fashion dialogues with art, telling about the fashion in the atelier and the Italian fashion history, the haute couture from its rise to the late Sixties. That is the core of “Bellissima. The Italy of high fashion 1945-1968”, exhibition curated by Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi and Anna Mattirolo, organized in collaboration with Altaroma and in main partnership with Bulgari which will be opened on 30th November 2014  at 7:30 pm and will be held from 2nd December 2014 to 3rd May 2015 in Rome at the MAXXI Museum. The exhibition talks about high fashion, Italy and its creative synergies, by using photography and art, giving rise to an open dialogue between different disciplines.

A model at the Rome Capitol Museums, behind the Constantine monument,  wearing a dress by Fontana Sisters (1952), photo by Regina Relang (courtesy of Münchner Stadtmuseum, Sammlung Fotografie, Archiv Relang)

A model at the Rome Capitol Museums, behind the Constantine monument, wearing a dress by Fontana Sisters, 1952, photo Regina Relang (courtesy of Münchner Stadtmuseum, Sammlung Fotografie, Archiv Relang)

Fendi Fall/Winter 1967-1968

Fendi Fall/Winter 1967-1968

Original sketch by Karl Lagerfeld, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, photo   © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

Original sketch by Karl Lagerfeld, Fall/Winter 1967-1968, photo © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

The photography by Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla, Ugo Mulas catchs the most important moments of this tale and the artworks by Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri, Paolo Scheggi, Massimo Campigli, Getulio Alviani, Carla Accardi and Giuseppe Capogrossi – coming from the National Gallery of Modern Art – evidence the vital creativity which marked Italy and an age. The creations by couturiers as Germana Marucelli emphasizes the connection existing between art and fashion. It’s a detailed display of fashion, featuring the garnments by Maria Antonelli, Renato Balestra, Biki, Carosa, Roberto Capucci, Gigliola Curiel, Fendi, FontanaSorelle Sisters(as the “Pretino” dress they created in 1955 for Ava Gardner), Irene Galitzine, Fernanda Gattinoni, Mingolini-Guggenheim, Fausto Sarli, Mila Schön, Emilio Schuberth, Simonetta and Fabiani, Valentino, Jole Veneziani along with the accessories by Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Gucci, Roberta di Camerino, jewelry by Bulgari – including the iconic creations “Snakes”- and fashion jewelry by Coppola and Toppo.

Model of Sorelle Botti, photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1947

Dress by Botti Sisters, photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1947

Two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking  in steps of Central State Archive, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1958

Two models wearing dresses by Valentino walking in steps of Central State Archive, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1958

Ugo Mulas, Lungo i Navigli, 1958 photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas,  courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

Ugo Mulas, Lungo i Navigli, 1958,
photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas, courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

The tale of exhibition is embodied in a marvelous catalogue (Electa, € 55.00) opening with a photograph by Garolla, combined with the words by Maria Luisa Frisa revealing what is the core of exhibition, the portrait of couturier and its role, being not just only “a creator, but an individual who observes the society where he lives, questions its many moods, …kneaded by the energy of his time” or bringer and interpret of “Volksgeist”, “The Spirit of people”, in a certain place and time.

Ivy Nicholson wearing a dress by Gattinoni at the Imperial Fora, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1954

Ivy Nicholson wearing a dress by Gattinoni at the Imperial Fora, photo Federico Garolla, Rome, 1954

 Giovannelli-Sciarra, photo Fortunato Scrimali published in the magazine Bellezza, n. 9, September 1953

Giovannelli-Sciarra, photo Fortunato Scrimali
ft. in the magazine “Bellezza”, n. 9, September 1953

 Ava Gardner wearing the  “Pretino"  dress, (created for her by the Sorelle Fontana  for a film the actress had to play but the film was never made. The  cassock apparel's idea was later taken over by director Federico Fellini for Anita Ekberg in "La Dolce Vita", 1960), 1955, photo Pierluigi Praturlon, courtesy of Historical Archive  Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Ava Gardner wearing the “Pretino” dress, (created for her by the Fontana Sisters for a film the actress had to play but the film was never made. The cassock apparel’s idea was later taken over by Federico Fellini for Anita Ekberg in  the movie “La Dolce Vita”, 1960), 1955, photo Pierluigi Praturlon,
courtesy Archive of Micol Fontana Foundation, Rome

Anita Ekberge ft. in "La dolce vita" by Federico Fellini, 1960, photo Pierluigi Praturlon, courtesy Archivio Fotografico della Cineteca Nazionale - Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia. Fondo Reporters Associati

Anita Ekberg ft. in “La dolce vita” by Federico Fellini, 1960, photo Pierluigi Praturlon, courtesy  Photo Archive of National Film Library – Experimental Film Centre. Fondo Reporters Associati

Bulgari, snake bracelet watch gold, red and green enamel and diamonds, ca1965

Bulgari, snake bracelet watch gold, red and green enamel and diamonds, 1965

Salvatore Ferragamo, Damigella ankle boots (created for Sofia Loren), 1957, photo Christofer Broadbent

Salvatore Ferragamo, Damigella ankle boots (created for Sofia Loren), 1957, photo Christofer Broadbent

Bulgari, Tubogas gold bracelet-watch, ca 1965

Bulgari, Tubogas gold bracelet-watch, 1965

The binomial between art and fashion will be also enriched by VB74, the performance created by Vanessa Beecroft exclusively for the exhibition which will be held during its opening. That makes “Bellissima” a not to be missed event and precious, as it dignifies fashion as source of culture and art, bringing again it in the place where it has to be: the museum. I tell that, thinking that can be a first step towards the path giving rise to a Fashion Museum in Italy or – considering also what it happens in other museums as the New York MET Museum the London Victoria & Albert Museum – of specific areas focused on fashion being into a museum.

LA MODA NELL’ ATELIER: LA MOSTRA “BELLISSIMA. L’ ITALIA DELL’ ALTA MODA 1945-1968” AL MUSEO MAXXI DI ROMA

Still image from the movie "The Barefoot Countess" by  Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1954, photo Osvaldo Civirani, courtesy Archivio Fotografico della Cineteca Nazionale - Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia. Fondo Civirani

Still image from the movie “The Barefoot Countess” by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1954,
photo Osvaldo Civirani, courtesy Photo Archive from the National Film Library – Film Experimental Centre. Fondo Civirani

La moda dialoga con l’ arte, raccontando la moda nell’ atelier, la storia della moda italiana e l’ alta moda dalla sua nascita alla fine degli anni Sessanta. Questo è il cuore di “Bellissima. L’ Italia dell’ alta moda 1945-1968”, mostra curata da Maria Luisa Frisa, Stefano Tonchi ed Anna Mattirolo, organizzata in collaborazione con Altaroma e in main partnership con Bulgari che sarà inaugurata il 30 novembre 2014 alle ore 19.30 e si terrà dal 2 dicembre 2014 al 3 maggio 2015 al Museo MAXXI di Roma. Il percorso espositivo della mostra parla dell’ alta moda, dell’ Italia e delle sue sinergie creative avvalendosi della fotografia e dell’ arte, dando vita un dialogo aperto tra diverse discipline.

Creations by De Gasperi Zezza, Fernanda Gattinoni and Sorelle Fontana - Fontana Sisters -, photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1948,  published in the magazine I Tessili Nuovi. Estate, n. 37, July – August - September 1948

Creations by De Gasperi Zezza, Fernanda Gattinoni and Fontana Sisters,
photo Pasquale De Antonis, 1948,
ft. in the magazine I Tessili Nuovi. Summer, n. 37, July – August – September 1948

Fendi, vison, mink coat, 1960. photo © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

Fendi, mink coat, 1960. photo © Pierluigi Praturlon/Reporters Associati & Archivi

Fendi, mink coat, 1960

Fendi, mink coat, 1960

La fotografia di Pasquale De Antonis, Federico Garolla, Ugo Mulas cattura i momenti più salienti di questo intenso racconto e le opere di Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri, Paolo Scheggi, Massimo Campigli, Getulio Alviani, Carla Accardi e Giuseppe Capogrossi – provenienti dalla Galleria Nazionale di Arte Moderna – testimoniano la vitale creatività che ha segnato un’ epoca e l’ Italia. Le creazioni di couturiers quali Germana Marucelli enfatizzano il legame tra arte e moda. Una dettagliata rassegna di moda di cui sono protagonisti i capi di Maria Antonelli, Renato Balestra, Biki, Carosa, Roberto Capucci, Gigliola Curiel, Fendi, Sorelle Fontana (come l’ abito “Pretino” da loro creato nel 1955 per Ava Gardner), Irene Galitzine, Fernanda Gattinoni, Mingolini-Guggenheim, Fausto Sarli, Mila Schön, Emilio Schuberth, Simonetta e Fabiani, Valentino, Jole Veneziani unitamente agli accessori di Ferragamo, Fragiacomo, Gucci, Roberta di Camerino, i gioielli di Bulgari – comprensivi delle iconiche creazioni “Serpenti” – e la bigiotteria di Coppola e Toppo.

Two creations by De Gasperi Zezza at Museum of the  Baths of Diocletian, photo Pasquale De Antonis, Rome, 1948

Two creations by De Gasperi Zezza at Museum of the Baths of Diocletian, photo Pasquale De Antonis, Rome, 1948

Gina Lollobrigida,  still image from the movie "Come September" (1961) by Robert Mulligan, ©Universal Pictures

Gina Lollobrigida, wearing jewelry by Bulgari, still image from the movie “Come September” by Robert Mulligan, 1962
©Universal Pictures

Anita Ekberg, wearing Bulgari jewelry, still image from the movie "Call me Bwana" by Douglas Gordon, 1962

Anita Ekberg, wearing Bulgari jewelry, still image from the movie “Call me Bwana” by Douglas Gordon, 1962

Il racconto della mostra è racchiuso anche in uno splendido catalogo (Edizioni Electa, € 55.00) che si apre con una foto di Garolla, accompagnato dalle parole di Maria Luisa Frisa che svelano ciò che è il nucleo fondante della mostra, il ritratto del couturier e del suo ruolo, il quale non è soltanto “ un creatore, ma un individuo che scruta la società in cui vive, ne interroga i molteplici umori,..impastato dall’ energia del proprio tempo” ovvero portatore e interprete del “Volksgeist”, lo “Spirito del popolo, in un determinato luogo e tempo.

Creations by Fercioni, photo Elsa Robiola,  ft. in the magazine Bellezza, n. 5, May 1951

Creations by Fercioni, photo Elsa Robiola,
ft. in the magazine Bellezza, n. 5, May 1951

 'Azalea Rosa',  Roberto Capucci, first show: Sala Bianca Palazzo Pitti in Florence, 1961, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive Roberto Capucci Foundation

“Azalea rosa”dress, Roberto Capucci, first show,  Florence Palazzo Pitti White, 1961, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation

1969 'Omaggio a Burri' "Homage to Burri", Roberto Capucci, first show at the Rome Capucci atelier in Via Gregoriana, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive Roberto Capucci Foundation

“Homage to Burri”, Roberto Capucci, first show at the Rome Capucci atelier in Via Gregoriana, 1969, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation

Roberto Capucci, first show, Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, photo Claudia Primangeli, Archive of  Roberto Capucci Foundation

Roberto Capucci, first show, Florence Palazzo Pitti White Room, photo Claudia Primangeli,  1959, Archive of Roberto Capucci Foundation

Salvatore Ferragamo, "Decolletè",shoes created for Maliryn Monroe in the movie “Bus Stop” by Joshua Logan, 1965, photo Roberto Quagli

Salvatore Ferragamo, “Decolletè”,shoes created for Maliryn Monroe in the movie “Bus Stop” by Joshua Logan, 1965, photo Roberto Quagli

Bulgari, necklace, earrings, gold and platinum with turquoises, sapphires, diamonds, 1961-1962

Bulgari, necklace, earrings, gold and platinum with turquoises, sapphires, diamonds, 1961-1962

Venice, 1966, photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas,  courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

Venice, 1966, photo Ugo Mulas © Eredi Ugo Mulas, courtesy Ugo Mulas Archive, Milao – Lia Rumma Gallery, Milan/Neaples

Il binomio tra arte e moda sarà anche arricchito da VB74, la performance creata esclusivamente per la mostra dall’ artista Vanessa Beecroft che si terrà durante la opening. Ciò rende “Bellissima” un evento imperdibile e prezioso, poiché dignifica la moda quale fonte di cultura e di arte, riportandola nel luogo in cui deve stare: il museo. Dico ciò, pensando che questo possa essere un primo passo per il cammino che dia luogo alla nascita di un Museo della Moda in Italia oppure – considerando anche ciò che accade in altre istituzioni museali quali il MET Museum di New York ed il Victoria & Albert Museum di Londra – di specifiche aree dedicate alla moda all’ interno di un museo.

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The Boldi Pezzoli Museum

The Boldi Pezzoli Museum, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

It has recently opened the exhibition “Thayhat. Between art & fashion” at the Milan Boldi Pezzoli museumwich runs until 25th February 2013 -, event organized by the fashion house Vionnet in collaboration with W magazine, featuring 61 sketches made by the Florentine genius artist, designer and inventor Ernesto Michahelles aka Thayaht who made the logo of Vionnet and reproduced by sketches, turned in illustrations, appeared on the Gazette du Bon Ton the creations by Vionnet. The exhibition focused on a successful collaboration between the two creatives who shared that libertarian yearning to make the body free, thinking – as Madeleine Vionnet asserted – “there is nothing more graceful than seeing the garment float freely on the body”.

“THAYAHT. TRA ARTE & MODA” PRESSO IL MUSEO BOLDI PEZZOLI DI MILANO

Thayaht

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

È stata recentemente inaugurata la mostra “Thayhat. Between art & fashion” presso il Museo Boldi Pezzoli di Milanoche prosegue fino al 25 febbraio 2013 -, evento organizzato dalla casa di moda Vionnet con W magazine di cui sono protagonisti 61 disegni realizzati dal geniale artista fiorentino, designer e inventore Ernesto Michahelles aka Thayaht che ha realizzato il logo di Vionnet e riprodotto in disegni, trasformati in illustrazioni, apparse sulla Gazette du Bon Ton, le creazioni di Vionnet. La mostra si sofferma sulla felice collaborazione tra i due creativi che hanno condiviso quell’ anelito libertario rivolto a liberare il corpo, ritenendo  – come Madeleine Vionnet affermava – che “ non c’è niente di più aggraziato che vedere la materia fluttuare libera sul corpo”.

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Thayaht, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Goga Ashkenazi, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Goga Ashkenazi, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Goga Ashkenazi & Stefano Tonchi, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

Goga Ashkenazi & Stefano Tonchi, photo by Giorgio Miserendino

www.museoblodipezzoli.it

http://vionnet.com

Louise Wallenberg, Maria Luisa Frisa and Judith Clark

It has been held in Venice at Aula Tafuri of Iuav University of Venice the international meeting “Diana Vreeland after Diana Vreeland, the discipline of fashion between museum and fashion curating” event coinciding with the recently opening of the exhibition “Diana Vreeland after Diana Vreeland” at the Venice Fortuny Museum, curated by Maria Luisa Frisa and Judith Clark – following until 26th June 2012 – which tells about the visual world of Diana Vreeland as fashion editor, editor-in-chief and fashion curator (and made me think about the poetry of Peter Greenaway – director of whose works implies an interactive experience for the viewer, loved and hated by many ones -, an exploration on the vanishing world of fashion suggestions and exhibition setting under the sign of the visionary world of an iconic persona. Maybe it’s a not easily understanding exhibition for the ones who expect to getting a mere synopsis by the exhibition path, successful evidence of the talent of fashion curators in making concrete a vision, something going beyond the materiality of objects, clothes, photographs, artworks, magazines, catalogues and books here exhibited). An intense day where the 29 panelists – Miren Arzalluz, Benedetta Barzini, Gloria Bianchino, Judith Clark, Becky Conekin, Frances Corner, Laurent Cotta, Amy de la Haye, Marco De Michelis, Kaat Debo, Alberto Ferlenga, Maria Luisa Frisa, Akiko Fukai, Francesca Granata, Harold Koda, Mario Lupano, Anna Mattirolo, Gabriele Monti, Alexandra Palmer, Marco Pecorari, Johannes Reponen, Amerigo Restucci, Marie Riegels Melchior, Jenna Rossi-Camus, Raffaella Sgubin, Fiona Thyssen-Bornemisza, Stefano Tonchi, Annamari Vӑnskӑ and Louise Wallenbergtold their experience as fashion curators, directors of museums as well as people who worked directly connected to Diana Vreeland, as Harold Koda – who talked about the approach, determination of Diana Vreeland in the storytelling while she was setting up an exhibition and included a nice story concerning the setting up of an exhibition where he wanted using of pearls put on a man and Diana Vreeland strongly opposed to that, replying him: “men doesn’t wear pearls” -, Benedetta Barzini who talked about her experience as model working for Diana Vreeland and marked on her work as editor-in-chief of Vogue, asserting Diana Vreeland wanted “women consume fashion, consume beauty” – interesting reflection drawing up the work of Diana Vreeland on paper to the core of Pop-art by Andy Warhol, the cult of celebrities, icons and products, the first step toward the rise and maximization of consumerism, something which followed inside out the realm of fashion magazines later in the years and has been quite different from her pioneer approach during the past years, more dandy as well as emancipating and assertive towards the women, paradoxically it subsided when women were going to start their emancipation. However Diana Vreeland held the visionary approach based on visual culture of whose she was a strong promoter as fashion curator. It could be told many things about her, but it has to recognize she was a bright mind and a pioneer. I like to think today if Diana Vreeland would has been still alive, she would be enamored for sure of the fashion film, a media emphasizing the importance of visual culture and she would used this media as editor-in-chief and fashion curator -, Laurent Cotta and Kaat Debo who talked about their experience in setting up the exhibitions featuring Madame Grès and Stephen Jones(“the Accenture of Fashion”, held at the Antwerp Momu), Marco De Michelis who focused on the theme of museology and answered to my question about the chance of creating a national fashion museum in Italy, telling me it’s hard at yet, but it needs to promote the fashion as culture, a gap still existing in Italy along with – what I think – the leaving of provincialisms of cities, thinking as nation and considering the history and the culture of Italy as a whole. The talk ended with the discussion – another laudable initiative, due act to discover the ideas of young curators and professors and knowing the new things that are happening in this realm, as well as the connection of past, Diana Vreeland’s legacy to contemporary times – of young curators, professors and experts as Gabriele Monti and Francesca Granata who talked about their experience as professors and fashion curators, marking on the idea to give shape to ideas. A laudable event to promote and increase culture in realm of fashion and I wish during the forthcoming times it is followed by another similar event for facing with the issue of Italian fashion museum and encouraging its rise.

“DIANA VREELAND AFTER DIANA VREELAND, LA DISCIPLINA DELLA MODA TRA MUSEO E FASHION CURATING”, UN CONVEGNO INTERNAZIONALE ALLA UNIVERSITÀ IUAV DI VENEZIA

Benedetta Barzini and Mario Lupano

Si é recentemente tenuta a Venezia presso l’ Aula Tafuri della Università Iuav di Venezia il convegno internazionale “Diana Vreeland after Diana Vreeland, la disciplina della moda tra museo e fashion curating” evento che coincide con la recente inaugurazione della mostra “Diana Vreeland after Diana Vreeland” al Museo Fortuny di Venezia, curato da Maria Luisa Frisa e Judith Clark – che prosegue fino al 26 giugno 2012 – che racconta il mondo visivo di Diana Vreeland nelle vesti di fashion editor, direttore editoriale e fashion curator (e mi ha fatto pensare alla poesia di Peter Greenaway – regista le cui opere implicano un’ esperienza interattiva per lo spettatore, amato e odiato da molti -, un’ esplorazione sull’ evanescente mondo delle suggestioni moda e l’ allestimento delle mostre all’ insegna del mondo visionario di un personaggio iconico. Probabilmente una mostra non facilmente comprensibile per coloro che si aspettano di avere una mera sinossi dal percorso espositivo, felice dimostrazione del talento dei fashion curator nel concretizzare una visione, qualcosa che và oltre la materialità degli oggetti, abiti, fotografie, opere d’ arte, riviste, cataloghi e libri ivi esposti). Una giornata intensa in cui i 29 relatori – Miren Arzalluz, Benedetta Barzini, Gloria Bianchino, Judith Clark, Becky Conekin, Frances Corner, Laurent Cotta, Amy de la Haye, Marco De Michelis, Kaat Debo, Alberto Ferlenga, Maria Luisa Frisa, Akiko Fukai, Francesca Granata, Harold Koda, Mario Lupano, Anna Mattirolo, Gabriele Monti, Alexandra Palmer, Marco Pecorari, Johannes Reponen, Amerigo Restucci, Marie Riegels Melchior, Jenna Rossi-Camus, Raffaella Sgubin, Fiona Thyssen-Bornemisza, Stefano Tonchi, Annamari Vӑnskӑ e Louise Wallenberg – hanno raccontato la loro esperienza nelle vesti di fashion curator, direttori di museo come anche individui che hanno lavorato con Diana Vreeland, quali Harold Koda – che ha parlato dell’ approccio e la determinazione di Diana Vreeland nella narrazione di una storia quando stava allestendo una mostra ed ha incluso una simpatica storia inerente l’ allestimento di una mostra in cui costui voleva usare le perle su un uomo e Diana Vreeland si era opposta fortemente a ciò,replicando a lui più volte: “gli uomini non indossano le perle” -, Benedetta Barzini che ha parlato della sua esperienza di lavoro come modella per Diana Vreeland e si é concentrata sul suo lavoro di direttore editoriale di Vogue, affermando che Diana Vreeland voleva che “le donne consumassero moda, consumassero bellezza” – interessante riflessione che avvicina l’ opera di Diana Vreeland su carta al nucleo della Pop-art di Andy Warhol, basata sul culto di celebrità, icone e prodotti, il primo passo verso la nascita e massimizzazione del consumismo, qualcosa che ha avuto seguito dentro e fuori dall’ ambito delle riviste di moda negli anni a venire ed è stato abbastanza diverso dal suo pionieristico approccio del passato, più dandy e rivolto allo stile come anche emancipante e assertivo verso le donne e la femminilità che paradossalmente si è attenuato nel momento in cui le donne stavano per iniziare la loro emancipazione. Diana Vreeland ha comunque mantenuto l’ approccio visionario, basato sulla cultura visiva di cui è stata una strenua assertrice nelle vesti di fashion curator. Si potrebbe dire tanto su di lei, ma si deve riconoscere e ricordare che é stata una brillante mente e una pioniera. Mi piace pensare che se Diana Vreeland fosse stata ancora in vita, si sarebbe di certo innamorata del fashion film, un mezzo di comunicazione che enfatizza l’ importanza della cultura visiva e avrebbe usato questo supporto mediatico nel suo lavoro di direttore editoriale e fashion curator -, Laurent Cotta e Kaat Debo che hanno parlato della loro esperienza nell’ allestimento delle mostre su Madame Grès e Stephen Jones(“the Accenture of Fashion”, mostra tenutasi al Momu di Anversa), Marco De Michelis che si è dedicato al tema della museologia ed ha risposto alla mia domanda inerente la possibilità di creare un museo nazionale della moda in Italia, affermando che al momento è duro, ma per arrivare a ciò bisogna promuovere la moda come cultura, una lacuna tuttora esistente in Italia unitamente – ciò che penso – all’ abbandono dei provincialismi di singole città, pensando come nazione e considerando la storia, la cultura dell’ Italia nella sua totalità. Il convegno si è concluso con la discussione – un’ altra felice iniziativa, atto dovuto per scoprire le idee dei giovani curatori e docenti e conoscere quanto di nuovo sta accadendo in questo ambito, nonché il legame del passato, dell’ eredità di Diana Vreeland con la contemporaneità – di giovani curatori, docenti ed esperti quali Gabriele Monti e Francesca Granata che hanno parlato della loro esperienza da docenti e fashion curator, sottolineando l’ idea di dare forma alle idee. Un lodevole evento per promuovere ed accrescere la cultura nell’ ambito della moda che spero sia seguita nei tempi a venire da un’ altro evento per confrontarsi con la questione del museo italiano della moda e incoraggiarne la nascita.

Benedetta Barzini

Diane Pernet and me at the Iuav University of Venice, photo by Diane Pernet

Maria Luisa Frisa and Stefano Tonchi

My nice companions during the meeting Deanna Ferretti Veroni and our friend

The exhibition about Madame Grès at the Paris Galliera Museum told by Laurent Cotta

Stephen Jones, photo from the exhibition Stephen Jones, the Accenture of Fashion at the Antwerp Momu, told by Kaat Debo

Barbra Streisand, an icon of Diane Vreeland on Vogue

Penelope Tree on Vogue

Gabriele Monti

www.iuav.it

It will be opened on 9th March 2012 in Venice at the Fortuny Museum from 12 am to 8 pm – by invitation only – the exhibition “Diana Vreeland after Diana Vreeland – which will follow from 10th March to 25th June 2012, promoted by the Venice Civic Museums Foundation and Diana Vreeland Estate, organized in collaboration with IUAV University of Venice and Mauro Grifoni, curated by Maria Luisa Frisa and Judith Clark which tells about the genius of – legendary fashion editor of Harper’s Bazaar, editor-in-chief of Vogue and consultant of New York Metropolitan Museum of the arts Costume Institute – Diana Vreeland. A smashing event under the sign of fashion culture as well asDiana Vreeland after Diana Vreeland, the discipline of fashion between museum and fashion curatingthe international meeting which will be held on the day after, 10th March 2012 from 9 am to 7 pm in Venice at Ca’ Badoer, organized by the Iuav University of Venice in collaboration with the London College of Fashion-University of the Arts London, the Centre for Fashion Studies of Stockholm University, International Talent Support and Confindustria Veneto, featuring the most celebrated fashion curators and fashion experts, coming from all over the world as Miren Arzalluz, Benedetta Barzini, Gloria Bianchino, Judith Clark, Becky Conekin, Frances Corner, Laurent Cotta, Amy de la Haye, Marco De Michelis, Kaat Debo, Alberto Ferlenga, Maria Luisa Frisa, Akiko Fukai, Francesca Granata, Harold Koda, Mario Lupano, Anna Mattirolo, Gabriele Monti, Alexandra Palmer, Marco Pecorari, Johannes Reponen, Amerigo Restucci, Marie Riegels Melchior, Jenna Rossi-Camus, Raffaella Sgubin, Fiona Thyssen-Bornemisza, Stefano Tonchi, Annamari Vӑnskӑ and Louise Wallenberg. A not to be missed event to think about fashion, fashion publishing, museum and fashion curating, celebrating an iconic persona.

 

“DIANA VREELAND AFTER DIANA VREELAND”, DUE GIORNATE ALL’ INSEGNA DELLA MODA & FASHION CURATING A VENEZIA

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Sarà inaugurata il 9marzo 2012 a Venezia presso il Museo Fortuny, dalle 12:00 alle ore 20:00 – solo su invito – la mostra “Diana Vreeland after Diana Vreeland – che proseguirà dal 10 marzo al 25 giugno 2012 promossa dalla Fondazione Musei Civici Veneziani ed il Diana Vreeland Estate, organizzata in collaborazione con la Università IUAV di Venezia e Mauro Grifoni, curata da Maria Luisa Frisa e Judith Clark che racconta la genialità della leggendaria – fashion editor di Harper’s Bazaar, direttrice di Vogue e consulente del Costume Institute del Metropolitan Museum of the arts di New York – Diana Vreeland. Un formidabile evento all’ insegna della cultura della moda come ancheDiana Vreeland after Diana Vreeland, la disciplina della moda tra museo e fashion curating il convegno internazionale che si terrà il giorno successivo, il 10 marzo 2012 dalle 9:00 alle ore 19:00 a Venezia presso Ca’ Badoer, organizzato dalla Università Iuav di Venezia in collaborazione con ilLondon College of Fashion-University of the Arts London, il Centre for Fashion Studies della Università di Stoccolma, International Talent Support e Confindustria Veneto di cui saranno protagonisti i più celebri fashion curator ed esperti di moda, provenienti da tutto il mondo quali Miren Arzalluz, Benedetta Barzini, Gloria Bianchino, Judith Clark, Becky Conekin, Frances Corner, Laurent Cotta, Amy de la Haye, Marco De Michelis, Kaat Debo, Alberto Ferlenga, Maria Luisa Frisa, Akiko Fukai, Francesca Granata, Harold Koda, Mario Lupano, Anna Mattirolo, Gabriele Monti, Alexandra Palmer, Marco Pecorari, Johannes Reponen, Amerigo Restucci, Marie Riegels Melchior, Jenna Rossi-Camus, Raffaella Sgubin, Fiona Thyssen-Bornemisza, Stefano Tonchi, Annamari Vӑnskӑ e Louise Wallenberg. Un evento imperdibile per riflettere su moda, editoria della moda, musealità e fashion curating, celebrando un personaggio iconico.

www.museiciviciveneziani.it

A sketch by Judith Clark depticting the setting of exhibition at Venice Fortuny Museum

Maria Luisa Frisa, eclectic and bright individual who is the Director of Fashion Design Faculty of Iuav University of Venice, fashion critic, author and fashion curator recently tells about the new project involving her, a fashion exhibition she curated along with Judith Clark promoted by the Venice Civic Museums Foundation and Diana Vreeland Estate which will be held in Venice from 9th March to 26th June 2012 at the Fortuny Museum, paying homage, reconstructing and telling about the genius of Diana Vreeland – legendary fashion editor of “Harper’s Bazaar” and editor-in-chief of Vogue who influenced the way to perceive and catch fashion yesterday and today as well as the way to display fashion in the Museums, being been consultant at Costume Institute of the New York Metropolitan Museum of the arts -, a successful chance to talk about fashion and fashion curating, being also the theme of an international meeting – organized during the opening of exhibition by the The Iuav University of Venice in collaboration with the London College of Fashion-University of the Arts London and the Centre for Fashion Studies of Stockholm University – which will be held on 10th March 2012 as well as exploring the fashion grammar and its imagery, Diana Vreeland contributed yesterday to develop and showcase and Maria Luisa Frisa today researches, defines, tells and showcase at best.

What is the path did you choose to tell in the exhibition you curated about the charismatic Diana Vreeland?

“I’m really very bound to the persona Diana Vreeland as fashion editor at editor at “Harper’s Bazaar” (1936-1962) and later visionary editor-in-chief of “Vogue America” (1962-1971), as well as curator of fashion exhibition, during her time spent at the Costume Institute of Metropolitan Museum from 1972 to 1989, year of her death. I started working on the Vreeland’s legacy in 2008, during the installation Vreelandesque, organized by Class Editors and curated by me that celebrated the Vreeland style and her visionary approach to fashion by a display of magazine for whose she worked as well as by editing of pictures of the exhibitions she curated. It has arisen since that project the will of bringing on more complex level the reflection about the fashion exhibitions and fashion curating and the fundamental role of Diana Vreeland in the evolution of these two aspects of that complex discipline that is fashion.

The exhibition, curated by Judith Clark and me, promoted by the Venice Civic Museum Foundation and Diana Vreeland Estate, will be held at the Fortuny Museum from 9th March to 26th June 2012. It’s the first exhibition explicitly reflecting on the complexity of Vreeland’s work, who has been simultaneously editor and curator and on her ability to use fashion as extraordinary flywheel for the imagination. It’s not only a fashion exhibition, but a chance to understand how and when many of imaginaries of contemporary fashion have arisen.

The exhibition tries to put a focus on the magnificent, imaginative journey that Diana Vreeland went through during the Nineties: the exhibition will be divided between the noble floor and the second floor of Fortuny Museum, a journey through 3 cores that – I believe – can tell very much about Diana Vreeland. It starts from elements of her personal style and obsessions, being fundamental to define her approach as a curator in the display and interpretation of fashion. Then it follows with the exploration of Diana Vreeland as a curator through her innovative exhibition projects: a series of typical museum cases, will emphasize the elements that featured in exhibitions by Diana Vreeland. Obviously the mannequins will have a central role, alluding to the original installations by Diana Vreeland and ideated exclusively for the exhibition by Judith Clark along with the La Rosa company. The magazines (original issues of “Harper’s Bazaar” and “Vogue America”), the catalogues and the books released during the exhibitions she curated will be the last core of the exhibition: a complex editorial work reflecting her ability to catch in advance tastes and trends through the Nineties.

The exhibitions by Diana Vreeland also includes a series of dresses, many of them to be seen for the first time in Italy as items of Saint Laurent and Givenchy worn by Diana Vreeland and coming from the archives of the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, in addition to some extraordinary Balenciaga items lent from the Balenciaga Museum, recently opened in Getaria, the most iconic creations by Saint Laurent from the Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent Foundation, precious items that marked the Nineties fashion coming from important private and institutional collections, including items of Chanel, Schiaparelli, Missoni, Pucci and the costumes of Russian Ballets.”

Are there an satellite events you organized around the exhibition?

The Iuav University of Venice – where I head the degree course in Fashion Design – organizes on 10th March 2012 during the opening of exhibition, an international meeting in collaboration with the London College of Fashion-University of the Arts London and the Centre for Fashion Studies of Stockholm University. The meeting, focused on the discipline of fashion curating features the most important names in International realm of fashion museum and curating of fashion exhibition as Harold Koda, Akiko Fukai, Kaat Debo, Alexandra Palmer, Amy de la Haye, Becky Conekin, Stefano Tonchi, Miren Arzalluz. It starts from the experience of Diana Vreeland at the Met and continues with a series of reflections about the topic of fashion curating and the relationship between fashion, installations and museums. I am involved in the day of studies which is part of the Curatorial Practices and fashion museography. The project in fashion, came out of the Department for research at the Iuav University of Venice. One more advance towards a better fashion presence between the academic disciplines in Italy”.

Do you think in our times there are other icons in the fashion system or publishing as powerful as Diana Vreeland?

“All of the stylists today are already genuine celebrities. They are photographed, featured on the blogs, editors of blogs where they show themselves and show their point of view about fashion. I think this genuine cult of personality is an evolution of what was already suggested by Diane Vreeland when she was a fashion editor at “Harper’s Bazaar” and later on as the editor-in-chief at “Vogue”. Now that the stylist has moved from the backstage to the center stage: it makes it more difficult (but maybe more interesting) to be unique and influential. The path towards a conscious self-styling, simultaneously detailed as well as visionary, makes it more difficult to rule”.

“Never fear being vulgar, just boring”, to which extent do you agree with the assertion of Diana Vreeland?

“The genius of Diana Vreeland was expressed above all by creating a grammar of excess. The exhibition and the release of the book – which coincides with the exhibition – is curated by me and Judith Clark and has the intention – of being naturally difficult – in order to reconstruct this visual and conceptual grammar. The intention is for the exhibition to create a setting for Diana Vreeland’s flamboyant vision of fashion, Diana talked about excess, allure, chic, pizazz, all terms that are now part of the fashion vocabulary. Naturally there is no fear of being vulgar, but there is still a need to measure the elements that give rise to excess. There is intuition, but also a specific algebraic system, allowing (or rather looking for) the mistake without losing sight of an equation of style, combining the natural with the artifice. A fashion algebra, which reminds me a lot of what Anna Piaggi tells us on her double pages” in Italian Vogue”.

What has changed in fashion print publishing, what stays from the past and what do we disguard?

“The magazine is here to stay. The double page is a fundamental unit for the construction of an issue and is an important element in expressing visual tales. We will always have the legacy left behind by great visionaries such as Alexey Brodovitch who was a graphic designer and art director of Harper’s Bazaar for nearly a quarter of a century including Diana Vreeland’s “Bazaar” years. He is the one that designed the mythological column by Vreeland, “Why don’t you…”.

What is your opinion about Diana Vreeland as a consultant to the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (who wanted the exhibitions to look like a part of the present instead of the past)?

“It’s the force of interpretation the risk always assumed by a curator. It’s an approach that doesn’t question the rigorous and fundamental work of curator (reconstruction the history of an object, dress, describing that in its own materiality and inserting in the age it came from), but it uses these views to make arising further reflections about the culture and fashion history, with a view starting from the past to develop new stories and catch never explored path”.

“The trouble with this country is that they want to give the public what it wants. Well, the public wants what it can get, and it‘s up to the museum to teach them what to want public”, said Diana Vreeland, is this assertion still contemporary?

“The answer is a complex one as it needs to take into consideration different types of museums (decorative arts, contemporary art, fashion, etc.). It must be said that still in Italy we do not have a genuine fashion museum that is of a level that it can compete with the big International museums and institutions. There are a few significant realities, but it still lacks, for example, a workable mechanism of connection. I think this has more to do with the outdated status of Italian reflection about the fashion culture. With this exhibition we are trying to bring a higher level of the discussion of these themes with Italian fashion. One must be very contemporary and it is urgent to resolve this problem with an Italian fashion museum”.

Considering the eclecticism of your work, what is your approach to define, observe, dialogue and promote art, fashion, culture and innovation?

“To act as a curator means that we must give rise to reflections about the visual contemporary culture which embodies fashion and art works. In acting as the director of a fashion school, the degree Course in Fashion Design at the Iuav University of Venice: my intention is to create a place that is a fertile ground for academic research and which helps to form a new generation of fashion designers”.

GRAMMATICA DELLA MODA & CURATELA DI MODA: IL GENIO DI DIANA VREELAND RACCONTATO DA MARIA LUISA FRISA

Veruschka in Yves Saint Laurent, photo by Irving Penn, Vogue 1st September 1965

Maria Luisa Frisa, eclettica e brillante individualità che é il Direttore della Facoltà di Fashion Design della Università Iuav di Venezia, critico di moda, scrittrice fashion curator, parla recentemente dell’ ultimo progetto che la coinvolge, una mostra di moda da lei curata unitamente a Judith Clark, promossa dalla Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia ed il Diana Vreeland Estate che si terrà a Venezia dal 9marzo al 26 giugno 2012 presso il Museo Fortuny che rende omaggio, ricostruisce e racconta il genio di Diana Vreeland – leggendaria fashion editor di “Harper’s Bazaar” e direttore editoriale di “Vogue” che ha influenzato il modo di percepire e catturare la moda ieri ed oggi come anche il modo di esporre la moda nei Musei, essendo stata curatrice al Costume Institute del Metropolitan Museum of the Arts di New York -, una felice occasione per parlare di moda e curatela di moda che è il tema di un convegno internazionale – organizzato in occasione della mostra dalla Università Iuav di Venezia in collaborazione con il London College of Fashion-University of the Arts London ed il Centre for Fashion Studies of Stockholm University – che si terrà il 10marzo 2012 come anche per esplorare la grammatica della moda ed il suo immaginario che Diana Vreeland ha contribuito ieri a consolidare ed esporre e che oggi Maria Luisa Frisa ricerca, definisce, racconta ed espone al meglio”.

Quale percorso hai scelto per ricostruire e raccontare nella mostra da te curata la carismatica Diana Vreeland?

“Sono particolarmente legata alla figura di Diana Vreeland, sia in quanto fashion editor ad “Harper’s Bazaar” (1936-1962) e poi visionario direttore a “Vogue America” (1962-1971), sia in quanto curatore di mostre di moda durante il suo periodo al Costume Institute del Metropolitan dal 1972 al 1989, anno della sua morte. Ho iniziato a lavorare sull’ eredità di Vreeland nel 2008 in occasione dell’installazione Vreelandesque, organizzata da Class Editori e da me curata che celebrava lo stile Vreeland e il suo approccio visionario alla moda attraverso una esposizione delle riviste a cui ha lavorato, come anche montaggi di immagini delle mostre che ha curato. Da quel progetto è nato il desiderio di portare a un livello più complesso la riflessione sulle mostre di moda e sul fashion curating e sul ruolo centrale di Diana Vreeland nell’evoluzione di questi due aspetti di quella complessa disciplina che è la moda.

La mostra, curata da Judith Clark e da me, promossa dalla Fondazione dei Musei Civici di Venezia e dal Diana Vreeland Estate, sarà allestita al Museo Fortuny, dal 9 marzo al 26 giugno 2012. Si tratta della prima mostra che riflette in modo esplicito sulla complessità del lavoro di Diana Vreeland, simultaneamente editor e curator e sulla sua capacità di usare la moda come straordinario volano per l’immaginazione. Non solo una mostra di moda, quindi, ma l’occasione per capire come e quando sono stati messi a fuoco buona parte degli immaginari della moda contemporanea.

La mostra cerca di restituire l’incedere immaginifico con cui Diana Vreeland ha attraversato la moda del Novecento: il percorso espositivo sarà articolato fra il piano nobile e il secondo piano del Museo Fortuny, un viaggio attraverso tre nuclei che crediamo possano raccontare Diana Vreeland molto bene. Si parte dagli elementi del suo stile personale e dalle sue ossessioni, fondamentali nel definire il suo atteggiamento curatoriale rispetto alla messa in scena e all’interpretazione della moda. Poi si prosegue nell’esplorazione di Vreeland come curatore attraverso i suoi innovativi progetti allestitivi: un serie di teche, elemento museale per eccellenza, enfatizzerà gli elementi che hanno caratterizzato le mostre di Diana Vreeland; ovviamente un ruolo centrale avranno i manichini che alludono agli allestimenti originali di Vreeland e sono progettati appositamente da Judith Clark insieme alla ditta La Rosa. Ultimo nucleo in mostra saranno le riviste (numeri originali di “Harper’s Bazaar” e “Vogue America”) e i cataloghi e i libri usciti in occasione delle mostre da lei curate: un complesso lavoro editoriale che attraverso il Novecento e riflette la sua capacità  di intercettare e anticipare gusti e tendenze.

Le mostre di Diana Vreeland includono da una serie di abiti, molti dei quali saranno visti per la prima volta in Italia quali i capi di Saint Laurent e Givenchy indossati da Diana Vreeland e provenienti dal Metropolitan Museum of Art di New York, alcuni straordinari pezzi di Balenciaga prestati dal Cristóbal Balenciaga Museum, recentemente inaugurato a Getaria, le creazioni più iconiche di Saint Laurent dalla collezione della Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, preziosi esemplari che hanno segnato la moda del Novecento provenienti da prestigiose collezioni private e aziendali fra cui capi di Chanel, Schiaparelli, Missoni, Pucci e costumi dei Balletti Russi”.

Hai organizzato altri eventi collaterali ad essa?

L’Università Iuav di Venezia – presso la quale dirigo il Corso di Laurea in Design della moda – in occasione dell’inaugurazione della mostra organizza il 10 marzo 2012 un convegno internazionale in collaborazione con il London College of Fashion-University of the Arts London e con il Centre for Fashion Studies della Stockholm University. Il convegno, dedicato alla disciplina del fashion curating, prevede la partecipazione dei nomi più importanti nel panorama internazionale dei musei della moda e della cura delle mostre di mode quali Harold Koda, Akiko Fukai, Kaat Debo, Alexandra Palmer, Amy de la Haye, Becky Conekin, Stefano Tonchi, Miren Arzalluz. Il convegno parte dall’ esperienza di Diana Vreeland al Met e continua con una serie di riflessioni sul tema del fashion curating ed il rapporto fra moda, allestimenti e musei. Ho allestito una giornata di studi che fa parte della ricerca Pratiche curatoriali e museografia della moda. Il progetto nella moda che rientra nelle attività dell’unità di ricerca del Dipartimento per la ricerca dell’Università Iuav di Venezia. Un altro passo verso una maggiore presenza in Italia della moda fra le discipline accademiche”.

Ritieni che oggi esistano altre icone nel fashion system o nell’ editoria della moda talmente formidabili come Diana Vreeland?

“Tutti gli stylist di oggi sono ormai delle vere e proprie celebrities. Sono fotografati, sono protagonisti dei blog, sono autori a loro volta di blog in cui si espongono ed espongono il loro punto di vista sulla moda. Credo che questo vero e proprio culto della personalità abbia che fare con una delle possibili evoluzioni di quello che ha suggerito Vreeland al tempo in cui era fashion editor a “Bazaar” e successivamente nelle vesti di come direttore editoriale a “Vogue”. Adesso gli stylist sono passati dal backstage al centro della scena: questo però rende più difficile (ma forse più interessante) essere unici e influenti. Il percorso verso un self-styling consapevole, simultaneamente preciso e visionario, è molto più arduo da stabilire”.

“Non bisogna aver paura di essere volgari, soltanto di esser noiosi”, in che misura sei d’ accordo con l’affermazione di Diana Vreeland?

“La genialità di Vreeland si è espressa soprattutto attraverso la messa a punto di una grammatica dell’eccesso. La mostra e la pubblicazione del libro – che coincide con la mostra – è da me sempre curata e da Judith Clark e si pongono come obiettivo – certamente difficile – quello di ricostruire questa grammatica visuale e concettuale. La finalità è la messa a punto per la mostra della visione flamboyant della moda di Diana Vreeland, Diana parlava di eccesso, allure, chic, pizazz, tutti termini che sono ormai entrati a far parte del vocabolario della moda. Sicuramente non bisogna aver paura di essere volgari, ma bisogna anche saper dosare gli elementi che innescano l’eccesso. C’è intuito, ma anche un preciso sistema algebrico che si permette (e anzi cerca) l’errore, senza perdere di vista un’equazione di stile che mescola naturalezza e artificio. Un’algebra della moda che mi ricorda moltissimo quella di cui parla Anna Piaggi a proposito delle sue doppie pagine su Vogue Italia”.

Cosa è cambiato nell’ editoria di moda cartacea, cosa resta del passato e cosa lasciamo?

“La rivista resterà sempre. La doppia pagina è un’unità fondamentale per la costruzione di un’ edizione ed è un importante elemento per l’ espressione dei racconti visuali. dedicati alla moda e ai suoi immaginari. Del passato resterà sempre l’ eredità di grandi visionari come Alexey Brodovitch che è stato grafico e art director di Harper’s Bazaar per circa un quarto di secolo, compresi gli anni di Diane Vreeland di “Bazaar”. Costui è colui che ha messo in pagina la mitologica rubrica di Vreeland, “Why don’t you…”.

Qual è la tua opinione sull’approccio seguito da Diana Vreeland nelle vesti di consulente del Costume Institute del Metropolitan Museum of Art di New York (la quale voleva le mostre apparissero come parte del presente invece del passato)?

“È la forza dell’interpretazione, il rischio sempre assunto da un curatore. Si tratta di un atteggiamento che non mette in discussione il lavoro rigoroso e fondamentale del curatore (che ricostruisce la storia di un oggetto, di un abito, descrivendolo nella sua materialità e collocandolo correttamente nel suo periodo di appartenenza), ma che utilizza questi aspetti per innescare riflessioni ulteriori sulla cultura e la storia della moda, con uno sguardo che parte dal passato per costruire nuove storie e intercettare traiettorie non ancora esplorate”.

“Il problema di questo paese è che vogliono dare al pubblico ciò che vuole. Ebbene il pubblico vuole ciò che non può ottenere e spetta al museo per insegnargli ciò che vogliono”, diceva Diana Vreeland, questa affermazione è ancora attuale?

“La risposta è complessa, soprattutto perché richiede di considerare diverse tipologie di musei (arti decorative, arte contemporanea, moda, ecc.). Mi limito semplicemente a sottolineare che in Italia manca ancora un vero e proprio museo della moda, in grado di confrontarsi con i grandi musei ed istituzioni internazionali. Ci sono alcune poche realtà significative, ma ancora manca, per esempio, un funzionale meccanismo di raccordo. Credo che tutto questo abbia a che fare con lo stato ancora arretrato della riflessione italiana sulla cultura della moda. La mostra e il convegno sono anche il tentativo di portare a un livello superiore il dibattito italiano rispetto a questi temi in relazione alla moda italiana. Una questione di grande attualità e urgenza è risolvere questo problema con un museo della moda italiana”.

Considerando l’eclettismo della tua opera qual è il tuo approccio per definire, osservare, far dialogare e promuovere arte, moda, cultura e innovazione?

“Agire come un curatore significa innescare riflessioni rispetto alla cultura visuale contemporanea che racchiude le manifestazioni della moda e quelle dell’arte. Agire come direttore di una scuola di moda, il corso di laurea in Design della moda dell’Università Iuav di Venezia:la mia intenzione è creare un luogo che sia un terreno fertile per la ricerca accademica ed aiuti a formare una nuova generazione di fashion designer”.

Veruschka in Valentino and De Barentzen, photo by Franco Rubartelli. Vogue 1st April 1967

Benedetta Barzini in Grès, photo by Irving Penn and the editorial by Diana Vreeland, Vogue 1st September 1967

Coat by Yves Saint-Laurent ( Fall/Winter 1969 collection) , photo by Duane Michals for Yves Saint Laurent, catalogue of the exhibition curated by della mostra Diana Vreeland (New York, The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 14th December 1983-2nd September 1984), New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1983

Costume worn by Joan Crawford in The Bride Wore Red (1937) made by Adrian, photo by Keith Trumbo featuring in the book by Dale McConathy with Diana Vreeland, Hollywood Costume. Glamour! Glitter! Romance!, New York, Harry N. Abrams, 1976, made after the exhibition Romantic and Glamorous Hollywood Design, curated by Diana Vreeland (New York, The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 21st December 1974-31st August 1975)

"Why don't you", the double pages by Diana Vreeland, Harper's Bazaar, December 1936 issue (first year Diana Vreeland works for “Bazaar”, who started on March 1936)

"Why don't you", the double pages by Diana Vreeland, Harper's Bazaar, May 1941 issue ( last time it appears the editorial)

Dress by Madeleine Vionnet (1925-1926), photo by Irving Penn featuring in Inventive Paris Clothes 1909-1939 (New York, The Viking Press, 1977), book made teaming with Diana Vreeland after the exhibition The 10s, The 20s, The 30s. Inventive Clothes 1909-1939, curated by Diana Vreeland (New York, The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 13th December 1973-3rd September 1974)

www.ashadedviewonfashion.com

www.museiciviciveneziani.it

A Shaded View on Fashion Film Festival, created by the pioneer blogger – and dear friend –  Diane Pernet will feature in the 10th edition of Art Basel/Miami Beach, event ideated in collaboration with ACRIA (AIDS Community Research Initiative of America) and the Morgan Hotel Group which will be held on 1st December 2011 at Delano Hotel, hosting “The Best of” fashion films from the latest edition of ASVOFF. Here it will be screened the Fashion Film Grand Prize Winner “I Want Muscle” by Elisha Smith-Leverock, “The Murder of Jean Seberg” by Joseph Lally, starring Daphne Guinness and Michael Brager, “Onions Don’t Make Me Cry” by Bryan Adams, as well as a selection of three films by celebrated cineaste Mike Figgis that will be diffused in various settings of Delano Hotel. The happening will be celebrated by a private dinner – which will be attended by personalities as Isabel Rattazzi, Stewart Shining, Luis Morais, Pablo and Victor Alfaro, Calvin Klein, Bruce Weber and Nan Bush, Donna Karan, Giorgio Pace, Nadia Swarovski, Sandy Brant and Ingrid Sischy, Francisco Costa, Stefano Tonchi, Serge Azria and Christian Restoin – and a cocktail party, sponsored by Belvedere. A not to be missed happening to enjoy contemporary art, film and fashion.

A SHADED VIEW ON FASHION FILM FESTIVAL AD ART BASEL/MIAMI

A Shaded View on Fashion Film Festival, creato dalla pionieristica blogger – e cara amica –  Diane Pernet  sarà protagonista  della decima edizione di Art Basel/Miami Beach, evento ideato in collaborazione con ACRIA (AIDS Community Research Initiative of America) ed il Gruppo Morgan Hotel che si terrà l’ 1 dicembre 2011 presso il Delano Hotel e ospiterà “The Best of” dei fashion film dell’ ultima edizione di ASVOFF. Ivi sarà proiettati il Fashion Film Vincitore del Gran Premio “I Want Muscle” di Elisha Smith-Leverock, “The Murder of Jean Seberg” di Joseph Lally con Daphne Guinness e Michael Brager, “Onions Don’t Make Me Cry” di Bryan Adams, come anche una selezione di tre pellicole del celebre cineasta Mike Figgis che saranno diffuse in vari ambienti del Delano Hotel. L’ happening sarà celebrato da una cena privata – a cui parteciperanno personalità quali Isabel Rattazzi, Stewart Shining, Luis Morais, Pablo e Victor Alfaro, Calvin Klein, Bruce Weber e Nan Bush, Donna Karan, Giorgio Pace, Nadia Swarovski, Sandy Brant ed Ingrid Sischy, Francisco Costa, Stefano Tonchi, Serge Azria e Christian Restoin – e un cocktail party, sponsorizzato da Belvedere. Un evento imperdibile per apprezzare l ‘ arte, il cinema e la moda comtemporanea.

www.asvoff.com

Maria Luisa Frisa and her latest book “Una nuova moda italiana”

It has presented in Milan at the NHow Lounge Hotel “Una nuova moda italiana”(Pitti Discovery/Marsilio € 34.00), the latest book by the bright Maria Luisa Frisa exploring and defining the Italian contemporary fashion, “a forced exit “ – as the author asserted during the talk featuring Stefano Tonchi, Angelo Flaccavento, Paola Nicolin and Silvia Robertazzi – made by a concept oriented approach, successfully depicting the constellation of contemporary Italian creatives.

“UNA NUOVA MODA ITALIANA”, L’ULTIMO LIBRO DI  MARIA LUISA FRISA

Maria Luisa Frisa and Angelo Flaccavento

È stato presentato a Milano presso il NHow Lounge Hotel “Una nuova moda italiana”(Pitti Discovery/Marsilio € 34.00), l’ultimo libro della brillante Maria Luisa Frisa che esplora e definisce la moda italiana contemporanea, “un’uscita forzata” – come ha affermato l’autrice in occasione del talk con Stefano Tonchi, Angelo Flaccavento, Paola Nicolin e Silvia Robertazzi – realizzata mediante un approccio concept oriented che dipinge felicemente la costellazione dei creativi italiani contemporanei.

 
 
 

Stefano Tonchi and Maria Luisa Frisa

 

me at the entering of the NHow Lounge hotel

 
 
 

Romina Toscano and me

 

Stefano Tonchi

Una nuova moda italiana”(Pitti Discovery/Marsilio € 34.00), magnificent essay on contemporary Italian fashion by the bright Maria Luisa Frisa – celebrated fashion curator and chief of Degree Course in Fashion Design at the University IUAV of Venice – redefining and reinterpreting the Made in Italy and its most emblematic personas which will be presented on 26th Fabruary 2011 from 3:30 to 5:30 in Milan at Nhow Lounge Hotel – event featuring the author along with Stefano Tonchi, Angelo Flaccavento, Paola Nicolin and Silvia Robertazzi and it will be released on 2nd March 2011. The book is a suggestive search, including 814 images and files, documenting the fashion shows and biography of designers – as Albino, Tommaso Aquilano and Roberto Rimondi, Boboutic, Gianluca Capannolo, Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli, Gabriele Colangelo, Carlo Contrada, Vincenzo De Cotiis, Marco De Vincenzo, Roberta Furlanetto, Bianca Maria Gervasio, Frida Giannini, Massimiliano Giornetti, Sara Lanzi, Leitmotiv, Renato Montagner, Rodolfo Paglialunga, Stefano Pilati, Fabio Quaranta, Mariavittoria Sargentini, Alessandro Sartori, Francesco Scognamiglio, Gianni Serra, Riccardo Tisci, Isabella Tonchi, Giambattista Valli, Franco Verzì, Sergio Zambon and Marco Zanini – made by Angelo Flaccavento, tells about the individual creative strategies, the changes in making fashion, exploring the creativity of designers  by a concept oriented approach, often successfully evidencing their eclecticism and multidisciplinarity. A precious source of culture for all the ones – not just fashion industry addicts, critics and enthusiast ones – who want to know, discover, enjoy the Made in Italy and deeply understand the contemporary times.

“UNA NUOVA MODA ITALIANA”, UN LIBRO SULLA MODA ITALIANA CONTEMPORANEA DI MARIA LUISA FRISA

Una nuova moda italiana” (Pitti Discovery/ Marsilio € 34.00), magnifico saggio sulla moda contemporanea italiana della brillante Maria Luisa Frisa – celebre fashion curator e responsabile del Corso di Laurea di Design della Moda presso l’ Università IUAV di Venezia – che ridefinisce e rinterpreta il Made in Italy ed i suoi più emblematici personaggi che sarà presentato il 26febbraio 2011 dalle 15:30 alle 17:30 a Milano presso il Nhow Lounge Hotel – evento di cui sarà protagonista l’autrice unitamente a Stefano Tonchi, Angelo Flaccavento, Paola Nicolin e Silvia Robertazzi e sarà pubblicato il 2 marzo 2011. Il libro è una suggestiva ricerca che include 814 immagini e schede che documentano le sfilate ed anche le biografie dei designer – quali Albino, Tommaso Aquilano e Roberto Rimondi, Boboutic, Gianluca Capannolo, Maria Grazia Chiuri e Pier Paolo Piccioli, Gabriele Colangelo, Carlo Contrada, Vincenzo De Cotiis, Marco De Vincenzo, Roberta Furlanetto, Bianca Maria Gervasio, Frida Giannini, Massimiliano Giornetti, Sara Lanzi, Leitmotiv, Renato Montagner, Rodolfo Paglialunga, Stefano Pilati, Fabio Quaranta, Mariavittoria Sargentini, Alessandro Sartori, Francesco Scognamiglio, Gianni Serra, Riccardo Tisci, Isabella Tonchi, Giambattista Valli, Franco Verzì, Sergio Zambon e Marco Zanini – realizzato da Angelo Flaccavento, racconta le strategie creative individuali, i cambiamenti nel fare moda, esplorando la creatività dei designer mediante un approccio concept oriented che sovente dimostra felicemente il loro eclettismo e la multidisciplinarità. Una preziosa fonte di cultura per tutti coloro – non soltanto gli addetti al settore dell’industria della moda, i critici e gli entusiasti – che vogliono conoscere, scoprire, apprezzare il Made in Italy e comprendere in profondità la contemporaneità.

Aquilano Rimondi Fall/Winter 2008/2009

Marco De Vincenzo Spring/Summer 2011

Gianni Serra Spring/Summer 2010

Giambattista Valli Spring/Summer 2008

Albino Fall/Winter 2009

Gianluca Capannolo Fall/Winter 2009

Colangelo Fall/Winter 2008-2009

Riccardo Tisci

Leitmotiv 2007

Fabio Quaranta Fall/Winter 2006/2007

Rodolfo Paglialunga for Vionnet Spring/Summer 2011

Maria Luisa Frisa